Social Media: What Moves Your Audience

Spaceballs_combFigure 1: Combing the desert in “Spaceballs”

There comes a time where photos of pancakes during Saturday brunch, random selfies in the park or outrageous political rants become too much handle on your social networks. It’s part of the reason why you un-friend someone on Facebook (in many instances on their birthdays), unfollow them on Twitter or block them on Snapchat. Simply put, it’s noisy and irrelevant.

Though we all crave constant interpersonal connectivity, many find that connection-based social networks and apps leave with you a tremendous rolodex of contacts and robust streams of content, but have shortcomings when trying to share with the people you really care about.

Matthew Bryan Beck, a NYC-based journalist and advertising strategist, exposes a timely topic of what he thinks is the future of social media: mobile tribes.

Just as tribes define membership by ‘different groups, movements, cultures or ideologies,’ we “band together in subpopulations of shared interests, tastes, demographics and marketplaces.” We, along with traditional tribes, then mobilize by choosing and controlling with whom we connect, communicate and share on a regular basis.

Brands and corporations – like consumers – seek to remain in control of how they engage their audiences. Where a Facebook ad spend or a Twitter buy may fall short in breaking through the noise, marketers invest in new platforms to camp out where their mobile consumer tribes roam. Though that’s much easier said than done. Beck asserts, “the age of the mega platform is over.” Consumers have become nomadic in their social-media sharing, app usage and content consumption, leveraging multiple platforms and devices simultaneously to tap into each of their disparate ecosystems.

At Bonfyre, we believe we align well with this trend. Each “bonfyre” is like it’s own ecosystem – an exclusive social network enabling brands to better engage their audiences with targeted, real-time consumer engagement around events and groups of people. The level of control is two-fold: participants “opt in” to the bonfyre – typically through a link, QR code or location-based invites – while the brand decides who’s invited, the content participants can receive and the manner in which they can share (“read-only” chat, moderation, etc.).

Ultimately, marketers should deploy an arsenal of apps, social media sites and experiences to better reach their tribes. There’s always a good story to tell, sometimes it’s just about camping out and listening in.

Seeking a mobile solution for your brand, client or organization? Contact us to learn more.

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