Archive for November, 2014

MOXY Gives Artists a Blank Canvas

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MKTG INC London recently traveled to Milan, Italy, for the opening of the first ever Moxy Hotel – a new lifestyle, design-led economy hotel brand from the Marriott group.

The launch event marked the crescendo of ‘Blank Canvas‘ – a six-month campaign designed and produced by MKTG INC that positioned the brand as a supporter of young mural artists to help it engage with its target millennial audience.

Over the past six months, more than 300 mural artists globally entered works of art inspired by Moxy. Three finalists were chosen by a panel of judges, including the editors of our media partners Street Art News and Global Street Art.

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More than 150 travel media, bloggers and influencers from across Europe attended the event, which was hosted by MTV presenter and top model Laura Hayden and Redbull DJ Stefy Oyadi. The launch climaxed with the Blank Canvas contest finale, in which the artists created a live piece of artwork in just 60 minutes in front of the party crowd.

The winner, Nune Kerobyan, won €3,000 and the opportunity to contribute to the design of future Moxy locations throughout Europe.

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Getting Down to BIZBASH with David Adler (Part 2)

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Photo Courtesy of BizBashIn Part 2 of our Q&A with BizBash founder David Adler, we talk about the future of event marketing and he identifies 2014’s biggest industry innovations.

What are the 3 most innovative events you’ve seen this year?
The most impressive thing I’ve seen this year was the coat check line at the opening media party for the Super Bowl. It was a freezing cold night and thousands of execs were gathered at Chelsea Piers. The company coatchex.com used texting and QR codes as coat-check tickets — you took a picture of your code, then your phone number became your ticket number; this made the experience of retrieving your coat actually fun. As I was going to get my jacket, I got a text saying that my coat would be ready for me. It was one of those new ideas that gave me goosebumps.

I also liked the Summit Series, a conference started by a group of innovators who bought a mountaintop resort, turning it into a $100 million real estate deal. The event itself was a gateway into relationships that changed the world. Attendees interacted with everyone from astronauts to politicians to Internet billionaires. They also created the world’s largest collaborative dinner by hiking people into the mountains and creating a table for 1,000 people.

C2 Montreal has also been a game-changer. People who attend feel like they’re entering a whole new role of collaboration that invigorates, inspires and creates lasting relationships.

Some brands that we think are really capturing the power of the event are outlined in our Top 10 Innovative Brands of 2014 story.

How has the growth of mobile technology affected your business?
Mobile has been one of the most important developments in events. That, along with responsive design, has changed the game. Event professionals want to hold the world in their pocket, and the concept of photo sharing has changed events—because ROI can now be judged not by the people in the room, but by the application of those people.

I’m reminded of the book The Mobile Wave, which talks about going up to a tombstone, holding up your phone, and having augmented reality show every video and article about that person. Imagine doing that in a live room just by wearing Google Glass or another device.

What do you envision to be the next trend or industry shift?
An empowered attendee is the next big thing. With new technology, we are seeing more power in the hands of the attendee. Now, the attendee needs to know how to be a great guest, and use it. They need to interact with other people to get the most out of the event, and they really have to want to be there.

Previously, I was the VP of corporate communications for major companies and spent hours preparing CEOs for events. We would collect guest bios and provide strategies on how to get what we wanted from them. Now with the advent of things like event apps, attendees have more power than ever, and can use the tools created by organizers to enhance their experience.

Youve said that one of your interests is using events as a philanthropic tool. What does that mean to you?
I believe in the concept of managed serendipity. Get the right people in the room, inspire them, show them how other people are using collaboration, and people will get on board to help your cause. There’s nothing like face-to-face events to motivate people. In Simon Sinek’s TED-talk, he says great leaders don’t have plans, they have dreams. He also says that people don’t buy what you do, they buy why you are doing it. Events are a natural gathering place for people who want to follow their hearts, rub elbows and share experiences.

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