Archive for July, 2016

Sign the Petition today!

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Captain Morgan: Let Millennials Run For President


Maybe the country wouldn’t be stuck with deciding between Clinton or Trump if those younger than 35 were eligible to run for office. Now, Captain Morgan is petitioning the U.S. government to allow those under 35 to become president as part of its new campaign.captmorgan

There are multiple agency partners working on the #Under35POTUS campaign, among them: Taylor Strategy serves as lead creative agency, MKTG for experiential, VaynerMedia for social strategy, Carat for media and Starpower for influencer engagement.

The project centers around the Under35Potus.com website where those over age 21 are encouraged to sign the petition to change Article II, Section I of the United States Constitution, which restricts those under the age of 35 from becoming president. If 100,000 signatures have been acquired by August 17, 2016, the White House will review the petition, distribute it to appropriate policy officials and issue a response. They have a long way to go. As of press time, only 464 signatures have been submitted.

To help raise awareness, Captain Morgan is introducing a campaign video featuring influential and notable Under 35s who are making an impact and changing the world in their own right – including Mogul’s Tiffany Pham, JASH’s Mickey Meyer, Thrillist’s Ben Lerer and Thinkful’s Dan Friedman. Their achievements are shown during the uplifting song “We Are Young” by Fun.

Captain Morgan also penned an open letter that appeared in the New York Times on July 19 calling on everyone to join the cause and sign the petition.

From now through November 8th, the #Under35Potus movement will also be supported by digital, social, PR/Influencer and experiential marketing efforts as well as a robust media buy across platforms like You Tube, Tinder, Buzzfeed, Snapchat, and ESPN.com.

“It’s no secret that Millennials have gradually been disengaging from the political process.  The fact that there are very few elected Under 35s on Capitol Hill is symbolic of this disengagement, and bringing more young adults into the democratic system can only make our nation better,” stated Adrienne Cuschieri Grooms, senior brand manager, Captain Morgan.  “It’s not like we’re trying to create change for the sake of change.  This is a very real and important issue.  Millennials make up some of the most progressive, innovative, intelligent, and successful people in our country – why shouldn’t they be able to be President of the United States?”

More than half (52%) of 21-34 year olds say lowering the presidential age requirement would be beneficial for the country, and a clear majority of those polled – 56% – say they would be willing to act on this idea by supporting an amendment to lower the age requirement.

provided by MKTG New York

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

July 21st, 2016 at 2:09 pm

MKTG CEO Charlie Horsey Summits Mt. Fuji in Japan

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Yesterday, our CEO Charlie Horsey joined a group of executives and new staff from around the globe to partake in an annual climb of Mt. Fuji. Learn more about this tradition at Dentsu Aegis Network from the AdAge article below.

MKTG CEO Charlie Horsey (l), Rob Horler CEO Dentsu Aegis Network USA (center in hood) and other leaders on Mt. Fuji in Japan

MKTG CEO Charlie Horsey (l), Rob Horler CEO Dentsu Aegis Network USA (center in hood) and other leaders on Mt. Fuji in Japan. The ritual started in 1925. Every July, Dentsu’s young hires and newly promoted executives climb Mt. Fuji, elevation 12,388 feet. From afternoon into the night, they navigate volcanic rock and ash to reach the summit for sunrise around 4:30 a.m.

 adageHow Japan’s Dentsu Climbed to the Top of the Agency World

Dentsu Does Things Differently, From Scaling Mountains to Sending a Robot Into Outer Space

By . Published on .

The ritual started in 1925. Every July, Dentsu’s young hires and newly promoted executives climb Mt. Fuji, elevation 12,388 feet. From afternoon into the night, they navigate volcanic rock and ash to reach the summit for sunrise around 4:30 a.m.

Tim Andree, a 6-foot-11 American executive, climbed in 2007, joining a pack of mostly Japanese 20-somethings. The Dentsu Inc. exec VP recalls awaiting dawn with 100 new hires and a few senior employees in a rest hut.

“You’re kind of jam-packed, and there were four executives kind of spooning each other on two tatami mats — it was close quarters,” Mr. Andree said.

Once there, exhausted climbers write postcards to clients and send them from the summit’s post office. Another tradition is prayer: “I prayed in front of the Shinto shrine for the success of my clients and Dentsu,” Mr. Andree recalled.

It’s clear the Japanese agency has taken a very different path to get to its current position: Dentsu Inc. is No. 5 in Advertising Age’s ranking of the largest agency companies. Yet western ad giants don’t ask employees to literally climb mountains and pray for clients’ prosperity.

Read more here

provided by MKTG Global Communication Team

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

July 21st, 2016 at 11:27 am