Archive for the ‘Discovery’ Category

Brands Should Be ‘Fearless’ In Sponsorship Marketing

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Brands with smaller budgets need to be “fearless” when it comes to sponsorship marketing, Colin O’Toole, marketing manager for the Cadbury Premier League Partnership, has said.

He added that businesses also need to put their trust in the agencies they work with and make sure they are fully behind the strategy.

O’Toole was speaking on a panel held by MKTG today called The experience economy: driving business value through sponsorship and shared experiences.

He said: “We have a lot of smaller brands and they don’t have the budget that Cadbury has [such as Green & Blacks]. You need to focus on what you are trying to do, so on one metric and [be brilliant on that].

“Be fearless about what you’re trying to do. If you don’t take a risk you’re going to get lost, but there’s a fine line between fearlessness and stupidity. You’ve got to trust agencies that they will do their job and give you the best advice and then you have to back them.”

O’Toole explained that the campaigns that Cadbury’s has been able to deliver successfully are ones that the brand has “pushed the boat out a little” but has remained within its values.

 

Read the rest of the article here

Article written by Gurjit Degun

 

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Written by The Wolf
The Wolf

October 13th, 2017 at 10:42 am

Today’s Trends: Portrait of Millennial Women

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By Ellie Strube, Experience Strategist

Millennial women’s aspirations for their lives are fluid, not black and white; they hope to balance both the traditional and non-traditional. Accordingly, they seek products that respect all of the roles they play.

These women have grown up in an era where gender equality was an assumed reality and positive reinforcement was ubiquitous. They are empowered with choice, but are comfortable making decisions based on what benefits them as individuals – rather than what advances society as a whole.

They prefer to be label-free, unencumbered and personally motivated. Egalitarianism is the new normal and brands need to know this. Blending traditional and non-traditional, choosing to be stay-at-home, part-time or full-time, there isn’t one formula and these women do not appreciate the mommy wars.

Millennial women feel Secret Deodorant is a brand that speaks to them. The campaign addresses how women have different roles – and brands need to know this. Further, Secret believes all people should be able to pursue their goals without fear. Women can be active, get nervous, lift their arms and just live their life without fear or embarrassment.

Sources: Iconoculture; Dig

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Written by The Wolf
The Wolf

February 29th, 2016 at 6:09 pm

EMS 2015 Takeaways

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EMS 15

The Good (But Not Surprising) News

Experiential is bigger than ever and only going to grow in importance. More and more brands are putting experiences at or near the center of their marketing mix. It’s increasingly a driving force, making up much of campaign content. One need look no further than this year’s Grand Ex winner – Bud Light and Mosaic’s Up for Whatever – to appreciate the sheer magnitude of this intensifying shift. Some data for 2015:

– 79% of brands plan to execute more experiential programs

– Budgets are expected to increase by more than 6%

Results. We all know that experiential marketing, done well, works. But there’s rising data to back this up which is partly why so many brands are turning to what we do.

– Over 75% of brands see better than a 2:1 ROI on their investment

– After an event, 74% of participants have a more positive opinion about the company, brand, product or service being promoted

– 87% of respondents say a live event helps them understand products or services better than a TV spot

– Experiential drives consumers to purchase: 98% of people are more inclined to purchase as a result of attending an event

– 71% of participants tell a friend or family member about their experience

northface

Recurring Themes

In examining the vast array of work showcased and dissected at this year’s summit, there were a few marketer behaviors that generated breakthrough experiences:

– They were bold. A no-fear attitude. The thinking is big risk, big reward. Examples: Heineken and KY Jelly (yes, KY Jelly).

– They pulled at heartstrings. Direct quote: “If they’re crying, you’re doing your job.” Examples: Dove, P&G.

– They created user-triggered experiences. See bullet one – this can be dicey – but not knowing what you’re going to get can be the brilliance of it too. Examples: Visa, Old Navy.

– They used experiences to do what nothing else ever could. This sounds obvious but when you watch the floor drop away at a North Face store in South Korea, you’ll get my meaning. Examples: The North Face, Samsung

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Using RFID to Improve the Customer Experience

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Photo courtesy of Tomorrowland.com

Today, RFID technology is so much more than an IPass or a race-timer. The technology has changed the way big corporations such as Wal-Mart handle their supply chain management, the way retail stores prevent shoplifting, and the way experiential marketers make use of their spaces. Here are a few ways events are utilizing RFID technology to improve experiences:

Tomorrowland Music Festival:
This Belgium music festival took to the wristband trend over the traditional admission ticket. When guests received their wristbands in the mail they could register their band to connect with their Facebook page. During the course of the two-weekend event, if any two guests pressed the button on their wristband at the same time while they were close to one another, the other person’s Facebook info would be shared via email. Every day that the guest attended the festival, they received an email of all the people they met that day.

Photo courtesy of TasteofToronto.com

Photo courtesy of TasteofToronto.com

Taste of Toronto:
The Taste of Toronto used RFID a little differently than just an admission ticket. They said goodbye to the dated ticket method for paying for food and drinks and instead provided each attendee with an RFID card. The guests could load money on the card and use it to pay for all food and drinks at the event. At the end of the day, if there was money left over on the card it was donated to Second Harvest Food Rescue.

C2MTL:
C2MTL, the Commerce and Creativity conference in Montreal, used UHF tags (similar to RFID but functions from as far away as 30 feet) to help staff the event. The tags were on each badge of the guests and the chandeliers were UHF-enabled to receive information from the guests’ badges. Producers knew when people entered the building and passed security successfully, and they also knew when to add extra staff to popular food stations.

Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival:
Bonnaroo draws thousands of guests to Tennessee each June. Guests registered their RFID wristbands online before attending the event, and in Bonnaroo’s partnering with Microsoft, linked them with a Microsoft OneDrive account. Every time the guest visited a photobooth or viewed a performance, they could scan their RFID band and have photos sent and saved to their account.

Checkout more smart uses of RFID in the BizBash article “6 Events Using R.F.I.D. Technology to Improve the Guest Experience.”

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Jay-Z, Samsung and the Art of Commerce

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jay-z-GO-HOME-TEEPhoto credit: TheSource.com

It used to be that there was no greater crime for an artist than to associate with a brand. It used to be called “selling out.”

But recently that’s changed. Now the high visibility of musicians in popular culture have mixed art and the cult of luxury. Hip-hop, that uniquely American sound of poetry and upward mobility, is a great example of this cultural phenomenon. And if any artist’s career mirrors the co-mingling of music and money, it’s Jay-Z, the artist formerly of the Marcy Projects and now of the 1.2 million Samsung Galaxy app downloads.

In a deal rumored at around $20 million, Samsung bought a million digital copies of Jay-Z’s latest album Magna Carta Holy Grail and made it available five days early to Samsung Galaxy owners through a unique app. Though there have been complaints from various news outlets, including the New York Times, that the app is a front for an elaborate data-mining operation for Samsung, the move earned Jay-Z a million-plus-selling album with less than three weeks of marketing behind it. In an era of intense struggling for record companies, the Samsung/Jay-Z alliance stands out as an unequivocal success.

Surprisingly, what has not been a major topic of discussion is the association with Samsung. And this is mainly to do with the power balance that has shifted in favor of musical artists in the past 40 years. Through the Internet, musical artists have been able to find their audiences without the extensive web of middlemen, resources and contracts that come with recording companies, allowing them a direct line of access to their fans and larger profit margins. This is common for both small and large artists now – Jay-Z left Roc-A-Fella, the label he started under Def Jam, years ago when it became too constricting. He now operates without a traditional label, and is able to pick and choose the partnerships that will give him the most creative freedom while remaining extremely lucrative. Major corporations, such as Samsung or Live Nation (another entertainment conglomerate that holds a multimillion-dollar contract with Jay-Z), are willing to invest in an artist that has a big following, all in the hope of a big payoff.

For smaller brands and artists, the main benefit is an increase in brand equity. An example is the partnership between fashion label Saint Laurent (formerly Yves Saint Laurent) and Zachary Cole Smith, the frontman of the band DIIV (pronounced “dive”). The luxury fashion house is luxury but in need of a fresh update, as evidenced by its new creative director, the young and arty Hedi Slimane. Slimane’s selection of Smith, whose shoe-gaze revivalist band’s debut album has sold barely 50,000 copies, is a clear indicator of the future of the brand: young, fresh, art-rock. By partnering, Saint Laurents gets endorsement from a highly respected niche artist, and Smith gets exposure and elevation from a top French fashion label.

So it looks like these kinds of unconventional partnerships are anything but – rather than unconventional they are becoming the norm. Very few artists will elect to go it alone, since there’s no such thing anymore of “selling out.”

Written by: Caitlin Buggy

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Houston, We Have Mach Speed

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RedBull1Photo Credit: Chris Liao

What does it take to make a leap from the edge of space?

One might say courage, or bravery, in the ceaseless pursuit to push the edges of science. And another might say that quintessential human drive to forge a legacy—to leave your mark on the sands of time.

Irrespective of the reason, those edges were pushed on October 14, 2012 when Felix Baumgartner became the first person to break the sound barrier in free fall—without the protection or propulsion of a vehicle. Sustaining supersonic velocity for 30 seconds of his four minute free fall, Baumgartner and the entire Stratos team worked tirelessly for five years to surpass this significant scientific milestone.

To commemorate the historic event, MKTG INC concepted and produced a traveling museum exhibit for the Red Bull Stratos Project. Visitors were able to learn about the history of the Stratos project, the team members, and the key scientific discoveries gleaned from Felix Baumgartner’s record-breaking fall 38,969.4 miles up in the stratosphere. Interactive slideshows, video, as well as the actual capsule and spacesuit used in the project kicked off on May 2, 2013 in Houston, TX at the Space Center Houston.

The exhibit will tour around the country into 2014.

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Got Case?

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CESImage Credit: Tia Farnetti & google.com

What did the MKTG INC team learn from the 2013 International Consumer Electronics Showcase (CES) this year?  Your phone, tablet and laptop will never be naked again. Bombarded with an endless variety of cases, it was hard not to think that 2013 could be the “Year of the Case.”  Thankfully, this was not the case (no pun intended).

Walking through 37 football fields worth of space and encountering 3,000 exhibitors, our team got to see what brands had in store for the world of electronics. Rather than “case” – this was definitely the year of “more.” More pixels (Ultra HD TVs), more connections (connected homes, cars, people), more apps (all your apps, everywhere, and all your devices), more inches (displays), more sensors (self-organizing robots), more me (customizable everything).

Product favorites:

Parrot AR Drones – A four-prop remote-controlled drone with an HD camera and a wide-angle lens

Hapilabs HapiForkSmart silverware dedicated to help people lose weight by vibrating when they are eating too fast

FitBit Flex BraceletA water-resistant activity tracker that rivals Nike’s FuelBand by syncing with the iPhone

Best exhibit: Hands-down choice was Samsung’s choreographed TV garden display of jaw-dropping, impressive imagery that left our team in awe.

Now that the MKTG INC team has the intel on all the latest and greatest to be found in the world of electronics, it might be time for the company to make its mark with its first product — maybe an MKTG INC case? Hey, if Snooki can do it with her couture headphones, so can we.

Written by: Tia Farnetti

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Space Marketing & Cookie Butter

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screenshot0280Photo Credit: mashable.com

Trying to wrap up 2012 into a single best thing is incredibly overwhelming. Was it the GIF?1 Was it Fab.com?2 Was it Trader Joe’s Cookie Butter?3 Well, these are some of my favorite things of the year. But, I should probably write about something that has affected everyone and makes some sort of sense for the MKTG INC BLG.

Well, space marketing it is.

This year, Red Bull sponsored a special undertaking by their team called the Red Bull Stratos. It was a skydiving mission in which a human in a new spacesuit leaped from a helium balloon over 120,000 feet above earth’s surface. The jumper broke the sound barrier with his face. Yes, the sound barrier. With his face.

This jump is interesting enough itself from a daredevil perspective, but it started a larger conversation. It wasn’t only about breaking records, sound barriers, or 12.6 million people watching the jump live on a Sunday afternoon. Red Bull, an energy drink company, did more for air and space travel this year than NASA could. This directly affects us an experiential agency because the space jump was an event. Not held in Times Square or the Mag Mile, but in the stratosphere and globally on YouTube along with a few cable networks. It pushed the limits on what companies can do to promote themselves. It took the idea of an event, so much bigger. Red Bull showed us that it’s worth the leap of faith to spend millions of dollars on balloons and a bunch of scientists to make a human free fall to earth for 10 minutes.

I’m more of a coffee drinker, but that afternoon I bought a Red Bull. I wanted to do my part in supporting this kind of fearless thinking. Whether it was for science, or to prove their slogan that Red Bull gives you wings, doesn’t matter—people were watching, and now everything’s changed.

1. GIF: The most expressive file extension, ever. Check out SoYeahDuh.com and ThisAdvertisingLife.Tumblr.com for instant smiles.
2. It’s basically Etsy meets E-bay, but for design snobs like me.
3. Yes, it’s a butter-like spread, made out of crushed cookies. I was carrying around a jar of it in my purse for a few days until I realized how weird that was.

Written by: Katie Davis

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Written by Admin
Admin

December 14th, 2012 at 7:15 pm

Does This Phone Make My Butt Look Big?

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old-cell-phonesPhoto Credit: www.cycledcells.com

Recently turning 42 made me do some thinking. Not about being a better person or climbing Mt. Everest. No, something hit me. The extremism that populated my youth seems to have evaporated. Back then, a few years time would drastically change the pop culture landscape. Think about it – disco, then new wave, followed by hair metal, indie, grunge and all of this was surrounded by equally absurd fashion trends. If one joined the Peace Corps and went off the grid for a couple of years, they would return to find a superficially very different country from the one they left behind.

But then, at some point in the late-90s, extremism seemed to fade out. Take a look at the cast of a pop culture phenomenon, like Friends, in 2000, and you’re probably not going to find anything particularly laughter-inducing about their appearance. Sure we’ve progressed, but that was 12 years ago. Just imagine people in 2000 sporting 1988 looks and listening to crap hair metal with crunch perms and fringed acid washed denim jackets – they would have been laughed out of the room.

I somehow picked up on this trend of non-trends through the last decade and complacently updated my clothes and haircuts only when absolutely necessary. No one seemed to particularly care or notice. That was until several years ago when I was at a meeting and working for a former employer. The iPhone had recently come out and, always the practical one, I felt that my old Samsung phone still worked just fine. It was a FLIP PHONE after all. I was sitting in a client meeting flanked by my two superiors and threw my phone on the table to make sure I didn’t miss anything important. The shock in the room was palpable and my boss hissed at me to hide it. He actually physically removed the phone from the table and threw it back into my backpack. After the meeting, he curtly explained that my phone was, quite simply, an embarrassment to the company and “did I not realize that I was eligible for a company iPhone?” That’s when it dawned on me – outdated technology is the new mullet.

Don’t believe me? Next time you go to a meeting and ESPECIALLY a meeting with new clients or potential agency partners, watch how fast everyone is to flaunt their phones, iPads, iPad Minis, Macbooks, and whatever the hell else they pull from their Jack Spade bags. They can walk in looking like hobos but their technology gives them an instant pass to legitimacy.

But then again, I can’t help but wonder – maybe I’m just old?

Written by: Greg Williams

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Written by Admin
Admin

November 20th, 2012 at 5:23 pm

Learn How To Speak American

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USA speech bubbleMKTG INC strategic partner and heartland consumer expert, Paul Jankowski helps brands effectively engage the most influential yet often ignored population—The New Heartland.  In his recent Forbes article, he encourages you to “clear your schedule for a couple of days, put on comfortable clothes and get to know your consumer’s culture.  Consider yourself invited to Nashville.”

He’ll be happy to show you around…

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

August 6th, 2012 at 8:52 pm