Archive for the ‘#mymktg’ Category

2017 TopSpin Charity Event

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For the eighth year in a row, MKTG was proud to produce another successful TopSpin Charity ping pong event last night at NY’s Metropolitan Pavilion. TopSpin raises awareness and provides funds for exceptional nonprofits that provide educational opportunities for under-served youth.

This was by far our most attended event with attendees spanning across brands, properties, media, leagues and agents. This year, 13 of some of NYC’s top restaurants provided amazing samples from their menus. Similar to recent years, bars were fully stocked with themed cocktails and this year’s silent auction brought some amazing sports memorabilia, including Shaq’s size 23 sneaker. Take a look below for photos from last night’s event!

Photos by Mitch Plaise @sh0tbyp

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Written by Paige McConney
Paige McConney

December 7th, 2017 at 12:42 pm

A Day In The Life of…Guinness Ambassador Ryan Wagner

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It’s that time again! Time to get to know another one of our amazing #HumansofMKTG.  To finish off the year, we’re taking a look at a day in the life of Ryan Wagner, our Baltimore-based Guinness Brewery Ambassador.

What exactly does it mean to be a Guinness Brewery Ambassador?

Well, there’s a team of nine of us around the country, we divide up the country evenly. My territory is Maryland, DC, Virginia, North and South Carolina, Georgia and Tennessee. It’s our job to kind of spread the gospel of Guinness in any way that we can. So it’s mainly focused on education, and whether that’s getting in front of the sales team at a distributer, or getting in front of the bartending staff at an on-premise account and making sure that they’re up to date on Guinness’s quality standards and pouring techniques and all those things. Then it’s also designing consumer-facing events. I’m working with the Maryland Zoo for instance, in creating a program surrounding live zoo animals and the animals that are on the Gilroy posters from Guinness. So I do whatever I can to increase awareness of the things that we’re doing and making sure that everyone is as educated as possible about the world of beer. Not just the world of Guinness, because if people are smarter drinkers, then we hope that’ll lead them to Guinness anyway. And then also because I’m based in Baltimore and our new brewery is being built here, I’ve been spending a lot of time helping everybody get up to speed at the brewery and in the taproom as well.

The cat that’s “probably screaming”

Would you tell us a little bit about your morning routine?

Because I work primarily with staff at bars and restaurants and things like that, I tend to use my mornings to get caught up on admin work, whether that’s responding to emails or dealing with expenses. So I usually take my time in the mornings because, more often than not, I know it’s going to be a later evening. I’ll spend the earlier part of the day working on the busy work.

 

What about first thing when you wake up in the morning? The before work stuff…

Oh my goodness. I hit the snooze button like 17 times. I deal with the cat that’s probably screaming at me. If it’s the day my fiancé doesn’t open the gym where she works, then I’ll get up and make breakfast for us. If she’s already gone and it’s just me then breakfast is something really simple like cereal. Then I sit down and turn the TV to CNN or ESPN and get caught up on what’s going on in the world. Finally, I open the computer and get to work.

 

Are you a big podcast listener?

Occasionally I’ll listen to a couple of the beer podcasts. Some of the stuff that the guys at Beervana do or Good Beer Hunting to, again, keep up with what’s going on in the market.

 

Do you have any go-to lunch spots?

Yeah, Smoothie King! When you work in beer, and you know you’re going to be drinking a lot of it, you know a lot of your calories for the day are going to be coming from beer. So you have to try to keep it light for lunch. It’s not always easy, but if there’s a Smoothie King around I try to have that for lunch.

 

What about an after work activity? Do you have a favorite?

Spending time with my fiancé. We both work a lot. Depending on the time of year I work three or four jobs and she’s busy as well. She’s a group fitness director for a regional chain of athletic clubs so my favorite activity is literally something as simple as an SVU marathon and laying on the couch and just being around each other.

So you said you’re typically working 3-4 jobs at a time, can you tell us a little more about what those are?

Yeah it’s quite a few things! My background is really varied. Obviously, Guinness is my fulltime job and where I spend the majority of my time. In addition to the experience I have working with beer, I have a couple other part-time gigs that are a lot of fun that I like to do whenever I have the opportunity to. One of them is teaching a class called Body Pump, which is a group fitness weight-training class. So I’ll typically do that once or twice a week it’s usually early in the morning where I’ll go to the gym and teach a class. And then I also work for the local CBS radio affiliate in Baltimore doing sports talk radio. So I’ll do that a few times a month, where I’ll pick up a few hours and go in and talk sports. Then I also work for the Orioles when they’re in season. I am the announcer at the ballpark at Oriole Park at Camden Yards, so I’m the public address announcer at the stadium.

 

So let’s say the Orioles are in season, what does your workweek look like?

I mean it depends. So they’re home 81 times a year typically for anywhere from 3-10 days in a row at a time so it really just varies from week to week. But if I’m working all of my jobs simultaneously, which doesn’t happen terribly often, I might wake up at 5am to go teach a 6am class. I’d get back to the house at 7:30, have breakfast, and work on some admin stuff until it’s time to go on the road and go do my Guinness day. I’d visit a couple of accounts, do a staff training, work with bartenders on Perfect Pour, meet with a distributor. I’d meet with my distributor manager, see what’s going on for the week with him. Then I would be at the ballpark by 5 or 5:30. The game would start at 7. I’m there until 10. Then there are days where I go right from the ballpark to the radio station to do 10:30 until midnight on the radio. Again, it doesn’t happen often but if I’m doing all four in one day that’s what it’d look like.

It was a pleasure speaking with Ryan about life as a Guinness Brewery Ambassador, sports announcer, group-fitness instructor, and radio host.  You can keep up with Ryan on Instagram and Twitter @rwags614 or just catch him at the Orioles home games next season.  

Now that we’re wrapping-up 2017 A Day In The Life pieces, I highly recommend closing your year by sitting down with a colleague you don’t know so well and getting to know them better. It’s a privilege to hear the stories of the people we surround ourselves with every day. One thing’s for sure, MKTG is full of some pretty amazing humans. – MaryKate

 

 

 

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Written by Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle
Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle

November 30th, 2017 at 2:28 pm

Discussing EventTech with Gavin Blawie

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We asked MKTG SVP Gavin Blawie some questions about his EventTech talk: IBM Sports & Entertainment Partnerships: Rules for a Wired World.

 

You spoke about our work with IBM at the recent EventTech conference in Las Vegas a couple of weeks ago. Can you share a few things to help those of us that couldn’t attend get a feel for your talk and also some key take aways from EventTech in general?

MKTG was at EventTech to share our integrated activation framework for IBM, and how over the last 3 years we have helped raise their social game through influencers and content made to share to better amplify tentpole partner events like the US Open, the Tony Awards and Pebble Beach, which are used by the client to demonstrate their technology expertise and build relationships with clients and prospects.

Overall it was a privilege to share MKTG’s success with IBM to a larger audience, and our approach to earned media is both a differentiator and a proven model that unlocks significant incremental value and amplification, and which is now applied across their partner portfolio.

How long was your presentation and were you solo?

I had planned on attending this session with our IBM client, but she was unable to travel at the last minute so I handled our presentation solo.

At EventTech we shared our philosophy of leveraging not just official partner content and feeds from IBM’s marquee sponsorships, but the idea that we enlist credible 3rd party influencers and their social graphs and feeds to personalize their sponsorships, and earn the partnerships exponentially more conversations and sharing.  Now, if you plan and execute events with a social mindset, you can unlock thousands of pieces of user generated content and tens of millions of incremental media impressions.

What major subjects did you cover? Did you get any great questions from the audience?

Best part of our presentation was our strategic framework to the larger event model, whereas most of the audience was focused on the physical, live aspects of wiring events to capture content and share, our approach stood out as a pre/during/approach social mindset to events as much as model to harness conversation and sharing.  Truth is brands always have tons of incremental content and conversations earned which flow out of and around events, the trick is typically that value dissapates like so much heat and light.  Now, it’s incumbent on MKTG as an agency partner to wire events to be shared to benefit the brand, using unified hashtags like #WatchPartyIBM and incenting people to share and spread the word at scale, it’s the difference between a great one off event for a small handfull, vs social conversations that travel across hundreds of personal feeds.

What were three key things you learned from the show floor? What was hot, and what was less impressive?

Augmented reality was everywhere, especially with the new AR kit in the latest Apple OS, and supporting tech to facilitate onsite sharing via hotspots and beacons, but still felt more like it was all a great tech coming than stuff which is actually here yet.  Lots of innovative camera rigs and technology to seamlessly stitch together 360 content, as fostering greater ways of personal, camera first storytelling from multiple POVs becomes the new model.

Overall, what were your impressions of the event? 

Event Tech Live was overall a very well run event, 3 full days of content, tech and partner overviews, as everyone in the space (client and agency) navigates the ongoing revolution.  Definitely much smaller an event than CES, but a great vibe and positive forum, and great reception to our thinking and approach to maximizing event impact through digital and social, as we were all from the same dedicated audience of experts in live & experiential meets tech – the show itself was probably attended by over 500, with a large standing exhibition space and 5 separate break out stages, which was larger than I had expected.

 

 

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Written by Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle
Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle

November 28th, 2017 at 10:23 am

Posted in #mymktg,Events

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MKTG Stands With DAN to support GLAAD On Spirit Day

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On October 19th, MKTG teams across the US sported their favorite purple to show support of GLAAD’s Spirit Day to show support for LGBTQ youth and take a stand against bullying.  For every photo tagged #DanSpiritDay and #spiritday DAN donated $5 to @glaad, and the team knew they had to get on board.

Shout out to the Westport team for the amazing turnout for such a great cause.

 

 

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Written by Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle
Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle

October 20th, 2017 at 2:14 pm

Posted in #mymktg

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MKTG Charlotte – Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund Fundraiser

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In September, MKTG Charlotte partnered with a local restaurant in Uptown Charlotte, 204 North, to host a fundraiser for the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund. They chose a day and time frame where 15% of all food and beverage sales were donated to the fund. They pushed the fundraiser in many ways to raise the most money possible, including creating a graphic to distribute, spreading the word on social and inviting family and friends to attend! In total, the MKTG efforts resulted in $200 raised for Hurricane Harvey relief!

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Written by Paige McConney
Paige McConney

October 18th, 2017 at 9:12 am

Who is Your Favorite Past Celebrity Endorser?

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MKTG members Kyle Goncalves, Geoff Biss, Marlie McLaughlin and Katherine Allen get together and discuss their favorite past sponsorship deals, why it appeals to them and how it has made an impact within the industry.

“Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater video game series was a trailblazer in bringing skateboarding into mainstream and sponsorship culture.” — Kyle

KYLE:

Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater shaped the world of skateboarding – it was more than just a video game. This popular series was one of the first and leading platforms, catapulting the sport into mainstream culture. To some, skateboarding was seen as a rebellious activity, but I believe that has shifted due to the work and talent of Tony Hawk as the series brand ambassador. In the late 90s and early 2000s, Activision (video game publisher) leveraged one of the best skaters of all time (Tony Hawk), and created a sense of credibility on a fun platform that allowed room for consumers to truly engage in skateboarding culture. The series and work of Tony allowed the industry to embrace the sport which created a new world for a variety of sponsors to dive into.

Whether you skateboarded or not – you knew the name and importance of Tony Hawk. Tony Hawk as a face for the series was a perfect choice due to his high performance and demeanor. He elevated the sport which opened the door for sponsors to consider skateboarders as marketable athletes – he definitely paved the way.

KATHERINE:

“Peyton Manning’s persona is strategically highlighted in MasterCard’s Priceless campaign” — Geoff

 

To read the rest of the article, click here 

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Written by Paige McConney
Paige McConney

October 9th, 2017 at 6:47 pm

Think Pink | MKTG Westport Raises Awareness for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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MKTG Westport rocking that pink!

October means a lot of things: Halloween, MLB Playoffs… and of course, Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  On Friday, Oct 6, MKTG Westport dedicated their day to raise awareness for the cause.

Employees were asked to wear pink to the office, and with an enthusiasm they obliged.  The pink didn’t stop there, as the team updated the Lego board, and Westport trainees decorated the office beer cart for a special run.  Even the beverages offered were pink-themed – Rosé, Zinfandel, beer in pink cans, and Mike’s Hard Pink Lemonade.

 

While the trainees made their rounds with the beer cart, they included a “tip jar” in which employees were encouraged, but not required, to toss in any pocket change they had laying around.  The office pulled together, and raised about $100 to donate to Breast Cancer Awareness & Research organizations.

Every little bit helps, and we’re proud of the Westport team for coming together for such a great cause!

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Written by Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle
Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle

October 9th, 2017 at 3:38 pm

Posted in #mymktg,MKTG 4 Good

MKTG Westport: Toiletries for Troops Initiative

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All year long the MKTGers of Westport, CT collect toiletries from our business trips, homes, and dollar stores to donate to A Project from the Heart, a local organization in Fairfield, CT that sends packages to our troops overseas. Our troops are always in need of these small items while living away from home. We feel it is important to give back to the troops to say thank you for all they do. Below are letters that A Project from the Heart has received from troops expressing their gratitude for the packages. This definitely makes us smile!


 

 

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Written by Paige McConney
Paige McConney

October 9th, 2017 at 10:59 am

A Day In The Life : Alex Torrey

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Alex celebrating his first week in the MKTG Chicago Office

This month we are featuring A Day In The Life of Alex Torrey. Alex sits in the VP of Strategy and based in Chicago. He joined the team this summer and his main responsibility is simply making sure the team brings their best, smartest thinking to the table in everything they do. Sounds easy right?

Alex moved to Chicago from Athens, GA after working for the CIA (yes, really) and for himself as Co-Founder of Umano, a socially-conscious clothing brand. Read on and learn about his experience at the CIA, as an entrepreneur, and what ‘decision fatigue’ is, in our interview with Alex.

•••

MK: What time do you wake up in the morning on a typical workday?

Alex: I wake up early. I wake up at 5:30. I’m a morning runner, I go for a short little jog. Chicago is a beautiful place for morning jogs.

 

Do you run on the lake?

I do, I run on the lake or the river. I don’t have a route. I’m very spontaneous, I don’t have a plan, so depending on how I’m feeling I either say Is today a lake day? or Is today a river day? and then I go from there.

 

What’s the first thing you do when you wake up?

My alarm clock is NPR, so I’ll usually lay there for a minute or two listening to NPR. Then I have a glass of water and I pee. Not always in that order.

 

So you use an actual alarm clock?

I use an old-time analog radio with the little scrolly-wheel thing. If I ever bump my alarm clock it’s all messed up and I have to find the right radio station again. Yeah, like an actual alarm clock.

 

Is there a reason for that?

That’s a good question. I don’t know. There’s something very comforting about the alarm clock, like the snooze slap. You actually hit something bigger than your phone. Then literally the first thing you touch is not your phone, which is also nice. The last thing I touch is, well, I double-check my alarm. So the last thing and the first thing that I touch in a day is not my phone.

 

That is really nice. What would you say you can’t properly start your day without?

Run.

 

Even on the weekends?

[hesitates] This is like literally the first thing? Because I also have to have a cup of coffee. Without NPR, running, and coffee, and I sound like an 80-year-old man. But NPR, running, and coffee are the three constants for a weekday/weekend that I couldn’t start my day without.

 

So how do you commute to work, do you enjoy your commute?

I do. And I am embarrassed to say that my commute is a four-minute walk. I live 3-4 blocks from the office so it’s quite lovely, quite quick. Sometimes it takes longer to wait for the elevator than to actually make the walk.

 

When you’re at work do you wear your headphones at your desk?

No.

 

Do you listen to anything at work?

No, that’s why I sometimes do the office DJ thing. Because I like having ambient noise, so when my office door is open I can hear the music outside and I open my window and hear the street, hear the train go by.

 

I totally agree, the train sound is great. Though, I wouldn’t want to be any closer to it. So, what’s your go-to jam right now?

I don’t know if my day has a playlist. Because I don’t think my day follows one story arc. So, sometimes the suspense is right off the bat or whatever that big climax is, the conflict and climax. Sometimes it’s later in the day. I’m really digging the new Foster the People album; it’s surprisingly good. It’s been out for a little bit but I just never got around to it. I love Discover Weekly. Discovery Weekly is a big thing. It’s not a daily thing, but it’s a Monday thing. I have to check out my Discovery Weekly and see what’s on there. Then they do that other curated thing…

 

The Daily Mixes! Those are my favorite!

Yes, the Daily Mixes are great. And, one of my daily mixes, I don’t know why, is this super hard hip-hop, just aggressive rap. I don’t know why, I guess I listen to it more than I think I do or their algorithm is a little wonky. But it’s good if you’re in that mood.

…..

What are your favorite podcasts?

This is not a podcast, but what I just watched a series recently and feel like I need to include it here. I just watched The Defiant Ones, the HBO series. I don’t usually do ‘series’ of things. I’m not a Netflixer or a Huluer. So it was a really big thing for me that I actually watched the whole four episodes. I was like Wow! I actually watched four episodes of something.

In terms of podcasts, I love Ted Talks. The Ted radio hour on NPR as well. There’s just something about them. That little sound effect at the beginning of Ted Talks, you know that psychology experiment where they rang the bell and fed the dogs, I’m pretty sure I salivate when I hear that Ted Talk sound. Because I’m so conditioned to think Ooh, something really great is about to happen and I’m about to learn something!

Then it’s about discovering. I’m not a loyal listener, I don’t have a podcast that I listen to religiously. I love searching random things like Hey! I want to learn more about why people love the food they love. And lo and behold, there’s a podcast about people loving food!

 

I think it’s funny that you say you’re not a loyal podcast listener, but you wear all black every day! I was meaning to ask you about this before.

What about wearing all black every day means I would listen to the same podcasts? [he kids]

 

Well, to me, the uniform suggests being a creature of habit!

Can I talk to you for a minute about decision fatigue?

 

Yeah [I eagerly respond]

Decision fatigue is a real thing. The human brain can only make a certain number of decisions and then it’s done. Then you go to sleep, reset, and get your decisions again. So what really important people do, and I just simply try to copy cat and emulate…

 

Like Steve Jobs!

Yes, like Steve Jobs, very much so. Also like former President Barack Obama. There was a great article on Fast Company about Barack Obama talking about how he tries to conserve his decisions. He doesn’t pick-out his wardrobe, he doesn’t pick-out any meal, he doesn’t pick-out any workouts. Obviously, he’s the President of the United States, so he has people to do that for him and I do not. Therefore, to simplify and save my decision making, so I can bring my best brainpower to work every day, I don’t pick anything. I hang my t-shirts. Clean shirts go on the right, the next shirt I wear goes on the left and I literally reach in every morning to the left side and grab whatever the next shirt is, next black t-shirt. Doesn’t matter! It’s beautiful. You don’t have to think about it. I use the same cycle for pants. New clean pants go on the right, the next pair I wear goes on the left. I actually don’t have a cycle for shoes, I actually have to look down and grab whatever pair is closest to me usually. So yeah, it’s all about decision fatigue. I can be really indecisive in general. So, for little things, I’m the worst. Like if I’m going to dinner with a friend, I am the worst human on the face of planet because they ask, “Where do you want to go?” I say “ Doesn’t matter”. It’s genuine, like I really don’t care. If I have preference, or something I don’t like I will voice it like a normal human. But genuinely it doesn’t matter.

 

Have you always dressed in all black? Or is this new?

Well, running a t-shirt company gets you a lot of t-shirts in your wardrobe. So all of a sudden, I had a lot of t-shirts that I really liked. So, because of Umano I started wearing only t-shirts, mainly t-shirts. And at Umano, the last couple years, we only did white, black and gray. So between the white, black, and gray I started getting more and more black tees. The next thing I know my closet’s full of black tees. The all-black thing has been going on for a couple years, but not very long.

 

Oh my god. I have to rethink everything.

[we talk for a minute about how grateful we are that we don’t have to wear suits to work]

So anyways, all black, it works!

 

I’m freaking out.

You should try it! And if you want to get really nerdy and geek out for a second about the human brain. There’s a game, surprise element of my system. To see what shirt am I going to get today, and I’m like, Oh, I got a plain one! or I got one with a design! Or I got a crew neck. Those are really the only options, plain, design, crew neck, v-neck, pocket, no pocket. They’re all black, but those are the only options. And I don’t know what I’m going to get, it’s actually a little endorphin rush. That’s a crazy thing about people. I don’t know what shirt’s coming and I grab it and I’m surprised.

 

What are the top five apps that you can’t live without on your phone?

Well, I’m not technologically inclined. I’d say Nike+ because I run with that. But I can live without it. I did for many years. So actually I would say these are the 5 apps that I would miss the most or that I use the most, but I really believe that I could live without them. I’d have to say, Text message or iMessage, Nike+, Medium, Business Insider, and probably Instagram.

 

Are there any restaurants or spots near your office that make your day?

I do like the after-work beer at Green Door. It’s cool to be so close to such a great drinking institution of America. It’s cool to swing by Green Door to grab a beer, and it’s literally next-door. It’s also great to bring lunch but go eat it by the park.

 

What after-work activity seals off your day?

Drinking that beer, usually. I’m not good at working out in the evenings. That’s part of why I’m a morning runner. There usually is a good little post-work beer, making dinner or meeting friends for dinner. And then I chill. I’m trying to read more physical books, so I read.

 

I’m inclined to ask about being on Shark Tank, because my last A Day In The Life subject, Drew, was also on Shark Tank! But I also kind of want you to talk about the CIA. Are you allowed to talk about the CIA?

I can, a little bit. All the un-classified things.

 

Anything is good. In my made-up version of your life, the all-black clothes thing was part of you having worked for the CIA.

Those were the suit days!

 

Yeah, as soon as you mentioned suits I realized you wouldn’t probably wear a t-shirt, jeans and sneakers to work at the CIA, haha. When you talk about not being technologically inclined, is that a result of working for the CIA?

Well, I guess I would say I’m not gadget inclined if that makes sense. I do like technology, but I’m definitely not gadget inclined. Which completely de-funks any idea you had about a secret agent or spy with all his gizmos and gadgets because I’m not a gadget guy, never have been, even in the CIA. I did, no joke, get to use a pen with a secret camera on it. I got to use it once, and that’s the only gadget I ever used.

 

I’ve seen that gadget before, I’m pretty sure it was in Spy Kids or an episode of Alias!

So I worked for the CIA, and did that for about four years. Spent a year in Afghanistan, got to do some really cool things like fly under the cover of darkness of the Afghan desert in a helicopter while bad guys shot rockets at us. It was a very cool experience and I have a tremendous amount of pride in that. I also have a huge, huge amount of appreciation for people who still do that stuff being, out in that type of environment, in a war zone. It was really cool. I got to brief the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Defense. I was involved in the POTUS visit, when President Obama visited Afghanistan. It was a surprise visit, for security reasons, but his advanced team was at station so we got to participate in that and get front row seats to the logistics of bringing the President of the United States to a war zone.

Then I quit that to go home, screen print t-shirts out of my parent’s garage and then sell the t-shirts. People didn’t believe me, they thought it was a cover story, that I was going deeper undercover because it was crazy. But I wasn’t, it was true. I legitimately quit. Long story short, CIA is an amazing place, a phenomenal experience, I describe it as 99% perfect. Not even 99% good, 99% perfect. The only thing that could have pulled me away was that I was a 25-year-old punk-ass and I wanted to find what was 100% perfect. Which is crazy, because when you have 99% why would you be so focused on that last percent? I thought the only way I would get the last percentage point was to start my own thing. For me, in particular, it was social entrepreneurship.

I started this company with my brother, called Umano, Italian for ‘mankind’. The concept was to showcase a kid’s drawing as a work of art. So the clothing was the canvas and wanted to connect the consumer to the story behind the art and really get to show a kid’s drawing as a work of art. There’s a raw confidence in a kid’s drawing, and we wanted to use our brand to showcase that. With every product purchased we would donate a backpack filled with art supplies. We would go on “giving trips” to give the backpacks and that’s where we would get the drawings, through our giving partners. So the team, going boots-on-the-ground, to give the backpacks on giving trips, gather the drawings, the virtuous cycle would restart. Really it was about that story of the giving trip and connecting the consumer to that story.

 

It was awesome, we did it for about 4-5 years. We were on Shark Tank. Mark Cuban is super tall, with a super long face. John Kerry too. Super tall men with super long faces. The camera does not do the lengths of their faces justice. Anyways, we were on Shark Tank, we got a deal from Mark Cuban and Lori Greiner. It was an awesome experience. They’re actually very nice, even Mr. Wonderful. The whole process, as you can imagine, is a massive production.

It was great, we did a couple other pitch competitions. We’d raised a seed fund from other venture capitalists and we were sold in Bloomingdales. It was great!

Social entrepreneurship is about making the greatest impact possible. True social entrepreneurship is when the cause is the reason you exist, it’s in your DNA, it’s why you’re there. So you attach a business engine to a cause and it’s powerful. I set out for  explosive growth. I wanted to be venture funded, with that hockey stick growth, and be the next Warby Parker kind of thing. But it was clear that we weren’t going to hit the high of explosive growth, and I decided to say, Well, that’s what I was looking to do. I am not looking for a four-day work week or to start a lifestyle business or play golf. I don’t play golf. So I went to look for what else was out there. Then, MKTG Chicago came along.

•••

If you can’t tell, it’s hard to talk to Alex for an hour, because you leave with about three more hours worth of questions. It’s okay though, I’ve been busy thinking about decision fatigue and all of the other ways I can cut small decisions from my daily life. Anyone else?

You can follow Alex on Instagram @alexxtorrey

 

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Written by Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle
Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle

October 2nd, 2017 at 4:28 pm

3 Key Trends in NBA Jersey Patch Sponsorship

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The NBA has become the first North American major professional sports league to allow ads on jerseys. During the 2017-2018 season, players in the NBA will sport corporate logos on their team uniforms. The ad space will be sold as part of a three-year pilot program where each team will have the right to sell its own ad space to sponsors. In consideration of the foregoing, MKTG has outlined the state of jersey sponsorship in the NBA, common activation strategies around the patch and potential implications for the league.

JERSEY PATCH SPONSORS STEM FROM CONSISTENT SOURCES; TECHNOLOGY BRANDS, FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND LOCAL EMPLOYERS

There are clear commonalities in the roster of sponsors who have invested in the NBA jersey patch. Firstly, technology brands are leveraging their patch sponsorship to drive mass awareness for their digital initiatives such as Sharecare and the Atlanta Hawks that are teaming up to improve healthcare for Georgia. Secondly, F.I.’s like Flagstar Bank (Pistons) and Western Union (Nuggets) are mass brands that historically have greater permission to invest in signature branding assets that reach mass audiences. Finally, employers with a large presence in the region of their local NBA team (Goodyear in Cleveland, Harley Davidson in Milwaukee) have invested back into properties that can be positioned as supporting local passion points, be a source of pride for employees, and block competitors from gaining traction in an HQ market.

BRANDS OUTLINE THEIR SUPPORTING ACTIVATION PROGRAMS TO COMPLEMENT JERSEY SPONSORSHIPS

In the majority of jersey sponsorships announced to date, brands are clear in their messaging; jersey patches are part of a broader commitment to the property. Brands are showcasing videos that highlight the brand synergies, collaborative tactics and creative activation strategies for teams and sponsor. Both Sharecare and Fitbit are leveraging their partnership to tackle health and wellness through their digital platforms. Sharecare is activating around their jersey sponsorship with their Sharecare Movement in collaboration with the Atlanta Hawks. In contrast, FitBit and the Minnesota Timberwolves are exploring ways to leverage and integrate their technology to improve player’s performance, and assist fans in making healthier choices during games. Jersey patch sponsorship is isolation can be perceived as an awareness-driving media buy. By complementing the asset with an integrated activation, sponsors will resonate deeper with fans.

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Written by Paige McConney
Paige McConney

September 25th, 2017 at 11:33 am