Archive for the ‘Advertising’ tag

Navigating Olympic Advertising- Rule 40

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The Olympics have been setting social media into a frenzied spin, yet your brands probably won’t be able to talk about it! Here at MKTG we have great experience in rights holder restrictions and helping brands navigate them to gain traction with creative ideas. We’ve been inundated by brands and network agencies asking us what can and can’t be done with advertising around the Olympics.

The phrase ‘Rule 40′ sends shudders down most marketers’ spines but what does it actually mean and how can you navigate your brands around these murky, hazardous waters?

In theory, Rule 40 stops the over-commercialisation of the Olympics but practically, it simply gives the IOC a way to prevent non-sponsors, athletes and your local bakery from hijacking the Olympics’ valuable brand terms and logos.

Generally speaking Rule 40 has actually been relaxed – contrary to many scare mongering reports. As of this year, the IOC now allow generic non-Olympic sponsor advertising during the period of the Games, provided it had been approved before March 2016 and is clearly part of a longer term marketing campaign (i.e. not just for the two weeks of the Games).

But what does that mean if your brand didn’t apply for these sanctions?  If you’re not an official sponsor like P&G, Coca-Cola or Visa, even posting about the Olympics on social media during the official blackout period — which started last Wednesday and ends on 24th August — can be like doing the 100-yard dash down Oxford Street trying to catch the rarest of Pokemon (if you didn’t get that analogy; it’s a minefield!).

Even, words such as ‘2016’, ‘effort’ and ‘Olympian’ cannot be used by non-approved sponsors in any sort of advertising.

Here’s a guide to the restrictions against business activity during the games:

    You can’t use hashtags that include Olympics trademarks such as #TeamGB or #Rio2016.
    You cannot use any official Olympics logos.
    You cannot post any photos taken at the Olympics.
    You can’t feature Olympic athletes in your social posts.
    You can’t even wish them luck.
    Don’t post any Olympics results.
    You can’t share anything from official Olympics social media accounts. Even retweets are prohibited.
    You cannot create your own version of Olympic symbols, “whether made from your own logo, triangles, hexagons, soda bottle tops, onion rings, car tires, drink coasters, basketballs, etc.”
    Do not host an Olympic- or Paralympic-themed contest or team-building event for employees.

These are just the top line restrictions, there are further phrases and terminology that brands are restricted from using.

In summary, the IOC are trying to protect the investment of their partners and prevent competitor brands from jumping on the positive sentiment of the Olympics.

What are the penalties?  Well, if you break these rules, you will first likely be sent a cease and desist letter, demanding that you remove the content.  The next step would be for the local Olympic Committee taking legal action against your business.  As such, the policing of this will be dependent on the strength and commitment of the local Olympic Committee – here in GB and also in USA, they are pretty hot on it, as you’d expect.

But non-sponsor brands can still participate in the Olympics conversation by creatively latching onto specific moments during the games, as Oreo did with its on-the-fly “you can still dunk in the dark” tweet during the Super Bowl blackout. This means establishing a war-room type strategy, when something uplifting or nerve-wracking happens. Other brands are using individual influencers (such as former Olympians) to help get their messages out during the Games. So, with the right message and the right brand, there will be opportunities to talk about it.  Remember to also run any campaign ideas for the Olympics past your local Legal team.

Ultimately, we have to think a little bit differently – don’t think of it as, “How are we going to get around the rule?'” but more, “How are we going to work within the rule, and what’s our tone of voice?”

 

–Contributed by Charlie Powell, MKTG UK 

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Written by Andrea D'Alessandro
Andrea D'Alessandro

August 9th, 2016 at 3:34 pm

MKTG INC @ Cannes Lions 2015

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A team from MKTG INC recently traveled to the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. The festival is the annual mecca for the global marketing communications industry, with the most powerful brands, media outlets, agencies of all kinds (advertising, PR, experiential, digital, technology, data, social, mobile, creative, and many many others) – approximately 15,000 people, flocking to Cannes to network, to visit brand experiences, to close major deals, to learn, to meet a lot of people, and in many cases take home some hardware.

Sure, the setting is seriously glorious, but it is honestly a beast of a week. Think Sundance or CES…at the beach…in the South of France, in the summer. You are running, watching a panel on a rooftop in 85 degree heat, then running into a freezing cold conference room and back again, and grabbing food along the way, usually until sundown when things slow up a bit.

Luckily, my friend Julie Thompson, a 16-year Cannes Lions veteran, wrote this hugely insightful article for Adweek, that I used as gospel to make sure I made the most of my four days in Cannes. Even with Julie’s help, I still overbooked myself, but not complaining.

Between the client and press meetings at our home base, the Dentsu Aegis Beach House, panels, Q&As, creative showcases, press sit-downs, more panels from Adweek, Medialink, digiday, LinkedIn and visits to Google Beach, Facebook’s Hacker Square, and my favorite stop, The Girls Lounge, I averaged 22,000 steps a day according to my trusty companion, my FitBit.

Anyway, rather than yarn on, I figured I’d share with you some photos I snapped along the way:

 

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JCPenney Reimagines Department Store Shopping

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LevisDenimBar

It was only a year ago that Apple Retail Chief, Ron Johnson, was announced as the new CEO of JCPenney.  A year has passed and Johnson’s vision for  the fledgling department store has come under fire, specifically from its pricing structure and the removal of the word “sale” from its vocabulary.

The company’s next initiative is to create smaller shops within the store. In time for back to school season, Levi’s, Arizona and Buffalo are the first concept shops to go live.

Levi’s shops will be in all JCPenney stores by the end of the year. Shops will include mobile checkout, a denim bar, and iPads to be used as another resource for shopper and staff including additional fits and product videos.

JCPenney plans for more store-within-store concepts for brands including Izod and Liz Claiborne. The retailer will also look into creating lifestyle shops (i.e. active sports).

Can JC Penney reimagine the department store?

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July 24th, 2012 at 8:37 pm

Yahoo! Fights Back With A Googler As CEO

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Marissa-MayerPhoto Credit: Fast Company

Many of us have forgotten about Yahoo! as the company has struggled to innovate. The fiasco with the last CEO Scott Thompson having fake credentials wasn’t a confidence boost for the public either.
Possible replacements were being thrown around and it was speculated that the interim CEO, Ross Levinsohn,  was expected to be announced any day. Hulu CEO publicly came out and said he was not interested in the position.
Monday came and out of nowhere, Marissa Mayer of Google was announced as new CEO. She was an early Googler (#20) and has been involved in many of Google’s hit products. Marissa was responsible for keeping the Google.com homepage simple and easy to use.
Big things are expected of her as she is seen as a product visionary. Some are hoping she can pull a “Steve Jobs” turnaround for the company.
Did I mention she is also expecting a baby. Congrats Marissa!

Many of us have forgotten about Yahoo! as the company has struggled to innovate. The fiasco with the last CEO Scott Thompson having fake credentials wasn’t a confidence boost for the public either.

Possible replacements were being thrown around and it was speculated that the interim CEO, Ross Levinsohn,  was expected to be announced any day. Hulu CEO publicly came out and said he was not interested in the position.

Monday came and out of nowhere, Marissa Mayer of Google was announced as new CEO. She was an early Googler (#20) and has been involved in many of Google’s hit products. Marissa was responsible for keeping the Google.com homepage simple and easy to use.

Big things are expected of her as she is seen as a product visionary. Some are hoping she can pull a “Steve Jobs” turnaround for the company.

Did I mention she is also expecting a baby. Congrats Marissa!

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July 18th, 2012 at 4:06 am

Lower Energy Bills = Happy Homes

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1280-Nest-happy-homePhoto Credit: FastCompany.com

Apple advertising usually makes the top of most lists for great advertising. We wouldn’t expect anything less especially from companies that have Apple veterans running them.

Nest, a smart thermostat company, was founded by Tony Faddell, the father of the iPod. The company has partnered with Goodby Silverstein & Partners for a new Happy Home campaign that includes TV spots showing homes that are happy from the outside due to the energy savings going on inside.

The campaign is also promoting the campaign on Pinterest where the company is holding a contest for followers to post pictures of “Happy” homes. What a good use of Pinterest!

If you haven’t had a chance to check out what Nest is doing, check out their website and the TV spot.

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July 11th, 2012 at 5:22 am

Gary DeJesus Shares His Expert Perspective On Online Communities

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DeJesusPhoto Credit: Ryan Beickert

Gary DeJesus, MKTG INC’s Senior VP of Corporate Development, advises how to make your online communities more effective in Word of Mouth Marketing Association’s blog, All Things WOM.

Exactly how do you do it? Click here to get his advice, tips, and more!

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

July 6th, 2012 at 5:54 pm

MKTG INC’s Intern Max Krauss Shares Experience in AgencySpy

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MAKE THE RULESPhoto Credit: Rob Lotzko

On June 23, MKTG INC’s own summer intern, Max Krauss, attended NIKE’s “Celebration of Sport” at Pier 46 in NYC for the 40th Anniversary of Title IX.  AgencySpy picked up on this and featured Max as their very first blogger for their new column titled “A Day in the Life of a Summer Intern.”  Be sure to read all about his experience and find out the lessons learned when going behind-the-scenes of an event here.

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

July 6th, 2012 at 5:09 pm

Will Mobile Ads Compromise the User Experience?

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Mobile AdPhoto Credit: William Hook

Mobile phone use has become pervasive in our lives – there are now 5.3 billion mobile subscribers worldwide, with a recent study showing that 3 out of 5 U.S. smartphone users do not go longer than one hour without using their phones. So, it only makes sense that advertisers are taking note and looking to connect with consumers in the places they spend the most time.

With that in mind, all of the major players are taking steps to beef up their offerings in hopes of cracking the promising mobile market. Both Facebook and Twitter have seen their mobile ad revenue surpass their web offerings. Following suit, LinkedIn recently announced that it too will soon begin to offer more mobile advertising opportunities.

At the end of the day, advertisers and Web giants alike recognize the need to sell more targeted and effective ads, and mobile is a prime opportunity to do just that. But, since mobile displays offer such a limited amount of space, the challenge becomes integrating ads in a way that doesn’t compromise the user experience.

A great example of this is Twitter’s “Quick Bar,” launched last year, which hovered at the top of screens to prominently display sponsored placements. However, after strong user complaints, this feature was quickly removed. This March, Twitter announced it would again enable mobile Promoted Tweets, but these would remain in feed and only where relevant, an obvious move to compromise with users. In a similar stroke, Facebook is now offering Sponsored Stories for mobile, which enables advertisers to place content in users’ news feeds. The social network will have to walk a fine line between inundating users and creating ROI for advertisers.

As the pressure to monetize mobile apps increases, it will be interesting to see how platforms maintain a quality experience lest they begin to lose users by cluttering interfaces.

Written by: Kristen Winzent, MKTG INC

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June 26th, 2012 at 12:56 pm

Build Your Brand By Not Talking About It… huh?

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londol-olympics-coca-colaPhoto Credit: FastCompany.com

We sometimes talk about brands as though their brand equity can be bought and sold. Recently WPP valued Apple at $183 billion where as Omnicom Interbrand valued the company at $33 billion. McDonalds placed second in one and first in the other. Let’s agree on one thing – these reports do nothing for how a consumer perceives a brand or have the brand does overall in building a strong following.

In a recent Fast Company article by Brian Millar, a strategy director at Sense Worldwide, he gave brands some unusual advice. When building your brand, stop talking about your brand!

For example, when was the last time Apple did a pure brand ad? 15 years ago? Instead the company positions the products as the heroes.

On the flip side, Coca-Cola, after years of focusing on brand building, the company lost touch with what consumers were actually drinking. The company has refocused their effort on design and increased their value.

Millar dares brands to stop talking about themselves for a month. Is this silent treatment a good idea? Check out the full article here.

I encourage you to check out the full article here. We sometimes talk about brands as though their value can be bought and sold. Recently WPP valued Apple at $183 billion where Omnicom Interbrand valued the company at $33 billion. If anything constructive comes out of these reports, one thing is that these valuations mean nothing to how well the brand is perceived by consumers.
An interesting Fast Company article by Brian Millar, a strategy director at Sense Worldwide, gave brands some good advice. When building your brand, stop talking about your brand!
For example, when was the last time Apple did a pure brand ad? 15 years ago? The company began positioning products as the heroes.
Or look at Coca-Cola, after years of focusing on brand building, the company lost touch with what consumers were actually drinking. The company has refocused that effort and increased their value.
I encourage you to check out the full article here.
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June 19th, 2012 at 7:00 pm

15 Seconds of Fame

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Screen Shot 2012-06-14 at 9.11.17 AMPhoto Credit: Viddy.com

Marketers continue to discover how consumer social media sites and services benefit brand communication and amplification. It is almost impossible to think about not “Liking” your favorite brand on Facebook or following a celebrity on Twitter.  While Facebook and Twitter are staples in the digital marketer’s toolkit, additional apps and networks are emerging as contenders. One of these is Instagram, which, in less than two years, has added more than 40 million users worldwide with 58 photos uploaded every second.

What makes apps like Instagram so popular is the ability to engage with the photos either through commenting or liking. In fact, every second users perform 575 likes and 81 comments. The increased engagement factor has made brands take notice and develop their own Instagram strategy. Photos and video are an easy way to share snapshots of a brands culture and livelihood. For example, Tiffany & Co. is giving fans a behind scenes look at how their jewelry is made including the tools, techniques, and people involved. Inside access is key for encouraging fans to come back, week after week.

While online photo sharing isn’t new, the elements of mobile and social are reintroducing photo and video services as hot new brand tactics. It is natural that video is the next to get a makeover…

Viddy, the Instagram of video is considered to be the next breakout star. With over 27 million unique users and Mark Zuckerberg as a registered user, the app is making video fun and social. Users capture video and add one-click filters and effects before sharing with friends through Facebook, Twitter, Foursquare and YouTube. The app lets users discover content by including a view of trending, popular and new videos.

Much like Instagram, Viddy currently has a library of effects, which it calls Production Packs, and includes music that is automatically added to the video during the upload process. Future enhancements include the opportunity for celebrities, movie studios and music artists to create premium production packs for consumers to purchase.

What makes the app creative is the 15-second limit. By forcing users to select only the best 15 seconds, you don’t have to worry about sitting through a five-minute video on your mobile device. Brands have an opportunity to create informal videos that can tease a new product or event and share among their loyal social media followers.

Whether it is a behind-the-scene video or a short customer testimonial, video is engaging and traditionally has a higher click-through rate. The sky is the limit in how brands can leverage their original mobile videos, in addition to encouraging their customers create their own.

One piece of advice for brands exploring photo and video strategies is – remember that consumers want an inside scoop. They feel a sense of brand pride when they receive a video walkthrough of a new office or the first glimpse of new product packaging.

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June 14th, 2012 at 4:14 pm