Archive for the ‘Adweek’ tag

Adweek Features Gatorade Combine in SXSW Ultimate Roundup of Experiential Activations

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We are so honored to share that for the second year running*, the activation we produced with Gatorade was featured as one of the best at SXSW. This year, in Adweek’s Ultimate Roundup. The activation, which we produced featuring Gatorade’s tech partners Kitman, STRIVR, and Sparta Science showcased a future Combine imagined by Gatorade and validated by Sports Illustrated. See what Adweek had to say about the Gatorade Combine:

“Gatorade’s Combine showed off the ‘future of athlete evaluation’ by partnering with three leading sports tech companies currently being used by collegiate and professional sports teams to evaluate player potential, increase efficiency and identify and minimize athletes’ exposure to injury.

Gatorade brought interactive exhibits from three sports tech brands to its downtown Austin corner. Kitman Labs uses a Microsoft Kinect to ‘analyze movement function and biomechanics for potential injury risk.’ STRIVR showed off what is essentially a very detailed virtual reality game used for situational training in football. The simulation puts you in the shoes of a quarterback and asks you to decide how to run a certain play based on what the defense is doing.”

Read the rest on Adweek

 

CNBC named us one of the best in 2016!

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Written by Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle
Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle

March 16th, 2017 at 11:10 am

Posted in Experience

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Lessons From a Veteran Super Bowl Marketer

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Our very own Mike Reisman, President of Sports & Entertainment at MKTG, offers his take on Super Bowl marketing for AdWeek:

 

By way of introduction, I’m a crusty old veteran of the sports marketing business—old enough to remember when my dad brought home our first color TV set to watch our beloved Jets win Super Bowl III (little did I know I’d be waiting 38 years and more for the next one). Along the way, I’ve been fortunate enough to attend a ton of football’s “world championships.”

You probably don’t care about my Super Bowl life story—I wouldn’t if I were you. But I wanted to provide context about the evolution of Super Bowl marketing in this digital/social/live video era—coming from someone who began watching Super Bowls when analog ruled. For what it’s worth, the most stirring Super Bowl emotion I’ve experienced were the pre-game ceremonies expertly staged by the NFL at the height of the Gulf War in 1991 in Tampa. Whitney Houston sang an absolutely exhilarating version of the National Anthem followed by a bone-rattling flyover by five Air Force fighter jets. The patriotic fervor during Desert Storm was palpable. The game was also pretty damn good—the Giants defeating the Bills when Scott Norwood’s 47-yard field goal attempt went wide right as time expired…

Read the rest on AdWeek

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Written by Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle
Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle

February 14th, 2017 at 12:51 pm

Advertising Week New York: Girls Rule

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Kim Kardashian, The Girls Lounge founder Shelley Zalis, Linda Yaccarino from NBC Universal and Andy Cohen, host of Bravo’s “Watch What Happens Live” at the Chelsea Piers Gala


Now that Advertising Week in New York City has wrapped, I felt compelled to pen a short piece about my impressions of the monstrous confab that takes over The Big Apple each year.

For the last 13 years, Matt Scheckner and his team at Stillwell Partners who founded Advertising Week in New York as a B2B event, have evolved it to be THE must attend advertising, marketing and media industry summit. It’s also grown beyond NYC to London and Tokyo and they’re hosting a smaller gathering later this year in Cuba. Yes, Cuba.

Once again, they somehow seamlessly pulled off over 280 seminars and workshops, breakfasts, concerts, comedy shows, breakfasts, dinners across 30 venues in NYC. For those who couldn’t be in two places at one time, they also streamed every single session online. In all honesty, I was unable to head uptown on the Wednesday but streamed the sessions, sometimes two at once, and watched on my laptop and monitor from my desk.

No surprise, as it is technically an “advertising” conference, the hot topics once again of the week were digital and the hyper growth of programmatic and of course content marketing. But, another major underlying theme of the week was WOMEN – not only how brands are marketing to (and sometimes objectifying) women, but also deep discussion on the disparity of women in senior leadership roles in our industry.

One of the most popular satellite events and my absolute favorite outgrowth of the ad/marketing conference circuit is The Girls Lounge. Founded by Shelley Zalis, The Girls Lounge is my “go to” destination from Cannes to AdWeek to CES. Shelley founded The Girls Lounge to create a place for women, and men, to connect, collaborate and empower each other. A place to check in, unplug (or charge your device) and take a break from the grind.

Each Girls Lounge is different per the conference, but every day is programmed with casual panels and keynotes featuring powerhouse women not only from advertising and marketing but entertainment, sports, and even finance. In addition to the panels each evening, they host networking events and parties that often go into the wee hours.

While at Cannes Lions they set up shop in huge penthouse suite at the Martinez overlooking the Croisette, at Adweek they tricked out a double decker bus and parked it right in front of the Times Center, the hub of the conference. The downstairs area of the bus was the primping area with experts there doing hair blow-outs and make-up touch ups – because power women have no bones about looking polished – and upstairs they set up couches and directors chairs for the talks. They also transformed a large suite within the New York Times building where they hosted talks and lunches. Another space, a pop up gallery called #SeeHer displayed empowering images from the past and present in partnership with the ANA’s Alliance for Family Entertainment (AFE). The Gallery’s aim was to end gender bias against women in ads by 2020 by bringing attention to the issue – a formal initiative from the ANA AFE.

The crowing jewel of Girl Lounge’s presence at Adweek was a gala event sponsored by NBCUniversal and held in the main ballroom at Chelsea Piers’ Pier 60 overlooking the Hudson River and Statue of Liberty. NBC reached into its arsenal of powerful talent and Linda Yaccarino, Chairman, Advertising Sales and Client Partnerships, NBCUniversal and Zalis interviewed Broadway and television starlet Kirstin Chenoweth. They were immediately followed by the uber-popular Bravo Network star Andy Cohen, who interviewed the one, and only, Kim Kardashian. The crowd of over 800, mostly women, hung on Kardashian’s every word as she talked about stereotypes and her personal focus to empower women, especially young women, to stand up for themselves and embrace their power and femininity. All in all, it was a hugely powerful night, not only due to the A-list talent on stage but the room of incredible women and the overall message permeating through the crowd.

In closing, Advertising Week in New York was a huge success and the programming was more diverse than ever. But for me, what came through loud and clear was that marketing to women and girls, as well as collectively supporting other women in business, is not a conversation that is going away. Men and women are talking about it openly and with platforms like The Girls Lounge being present at our industry’s main conferences, it’s only going to get louder!

–Contributed by Stephanie Rudnick, SVP Communications, MKTG USA | Global Brand Communications Director MKTG twitter and insta: @stephrudnick

 

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MKTG INC @ Cannes Lions 2015

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A team from MKTG INC recently traveled to the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. The festival is the annual mecca for the global marketing communications industry, with the most powerful brands, media outlets, agencies of all kinds (advertising, PR, experiential, digital, technology, data, social, mobile, creative, and many many others) – approximately 15,000 people, flocking to Cannes to network, to visit brand experiences, to close major deals, to learn, to meet a lot of people, and in many cases take home some hardware.

Sure, the setting is seriously glorious, but it is honestly a beast of a week. Think Sundance or CES…at the beach…in the South of France, in the summer. You are running, watching a panel on a rooftop in 85 degree heat, then running into a freezing cold conference room and back again, and grabbing food along the way, usually until sundown when things slow up a bit.

Luckily, my friend Julie Thompson, a 16-year Cannes Lions veteran, wrote this hugely insightful article for Adweek, that I used as gospel to make sure I made the most of my four days in Cannes. Even with Julie’s help, I still overbooked myself, but not complaining.

Between the client and press meetings at our home base, the Dentsu Aegis Beach House, panels, Q&As, creative showcases, press sit-downs, more panels from Adweek, Medialink, digiday, LinkedIn and visits to Google Beach, Facebook’s Hacker Square, and my favorite stop, The Girls Lounge, I averaged 22,000 steps a day according to my trusty companion, my FitBit.

Anyway, rather than yarn on, I figured I’d share with you some photos I snapped along the way:

 

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New Faces: COO Peter Office

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FullSizeRender[2]For this month’s Guest Column, we sat down with Peter Office, who has joined MKTG INC as Chief Operating Officer. A 25-year industry veteran, Peter shares his thoughts on experiential marketing, MKTG and the best advice he’s ever received.

Welcome to MKTG INC! Tell us a little about yourself.
I’ve been in the experiential marketing industry for a long time, watching the industry go from unsophisticated one-off programs to fully integrated experiences. I started my career in brand management at Pepsi and then moved into the experiential space working for several agencies… from producing B2B meetings to building and managing hospitality villages at Super Bowls, PGA Championships, Ryder Cups and U.S. Open events. I moved to the B2C side by producing marketing and entertainment tours, pop-up retail, location-based experiences and promotional events around the world.

I spent 10 years at Momentum leading the Live Events teams and had a stint as Chief People Officer. Most recently, I have been consulting for a variety of marketing agencies.

What will your role be here at MKTG INC?
As Chief Operations Officer, I will be working with all departments to figure out methods to streamline operations and become more efficient so our teams can spend more time focusing on providing great marketing solutions for our clients while improving margins.

As an industry veteran, how would you say MKTG stands out in the marketplace?
MKTG has the nimble approach of a small boutique with the resources of a large agency. The size of the agency makes it feel personal. The energy and enthusiasm of so many smart people working together is a great environment.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?
Two pieces of advice stand out: (1) “Make every decision as if you owned the business.” If you think like an owner, you are always working to do the right thing. (2) “Always hire people smarter than you are.” Smart people make you and the company better – never be scared to have them around.

MKTG was recently acquired by Dentsu Aegis. What does this mean for MKTG staff and clients?
Being part of a global agency provides opportunity. Opportunity for us to provide smarter integrated solutions for our clients. And personal opportunity for individuals to learn new disciplines and to develop new expertise.

What are your predictions for the event marketing industry in 2015?
A continued blurring of the lines between social and experiential. The creation of content for social amplification will require live experience as more people look for authenticity. The importance of the human connection will continue to grow as consumers tire of the always-connected world. The tangible experience our industry provides will be welcome as people want to touch, taste and feel brands. Live interaction will be appreciated as a “tech timeout.”

Technology will continue to play a greater role in events but content and the experience will be personalized. Personalization, tailored conversations and immersive experiences will make each interaction unique.

Experiential marketing will continue to evolve from tactical/executional projects to larger strategic platforms. We will continue to see greater integration and closer working relationships with other marketing disciplines as experiential provides the platform for sponsorships, PR and digital.

What publications/websites do you find most relevant to your career?

I start the day with the NY Times and then run through a variety of news, blogs and RSS feeds (Trend Hunter, Springwise, PSFK, Mashable, Seth Goodin, HBR.org, Wired and others) using the Feedly reader. I keep up with the industry news reading Crains, Advertising Age, MediaPost, Adweek and Event Marketer. LinkedIn is my go-to site for gathering intelligence about people and companies and finding networking contacts.

What are your favorite apps?
I use many apps regularly but a few daily use apps include: Keeper, Evernote, ScannerPro, IFly Pro, HopStop, Uber, The Weather Channel, Urbanspoon and BizXpense Trkr.

As a frequent flyer, what are three things you always pack?

A water bottle, granola bars and a phone charger.

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Q&A with psLIVE’s Peter Pearce

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Peter PearceFor this month’s Guest Column, we sat down with Peter Pearce, who heads up the Atlanta office for our new sister agency, psLIVE. Hear how he got where he is, where he’s going and why he loves his job.

Tell us about psLIVE – how do you describe the company to strangers?
My elevator pitch usually starts with defining “lifestyle marketing” (sports, entertainment, grassroots, retail) and who our clients are. Then I describe the work we do: Large-scale sponsorship activation, event development, mobile tours, sampling, street teams, staffing. You take it for granted because you live it every day, but the usual reaction is “that sounds like a lot of fun,” and it is!

What differentiates psLIVE from the competition? 
I think it all starts with our values – we live them every day. We are fiercely competitive, and our reputation for “doing it right” has followed us since inception. Secondly, the Dentsu Aegis push to collaborate across agency brands is a huge advantage – shared insights, tools and resources are a great business driver. Finally, we’re not just a creative, client-service and production agency. We are vertically integrated, with assets and services inhouse that many agencies outsource. This allows us to achieve budget efficiencies and get to market quickly.

What three words would you use to describe your staff?
Best. In. Class.

How did you get into this industry?
It’s sobering to realize I’ve been in the business for 18 years! I finished school and worked for the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games after school, then I began in the agency world at what is now CSE (formerly Career Sports Entertainment). After five years, I helped open the Atlanta office of Strategic Sports Group, where I spent another five years building that business. I’ve now been with psLIVE (formerly Vivid and Team Epic) for eight years, and it has been a great ride so far.

Looking back at 2014, do you have a few favorite programs or campaigns your teams managed?
That’s hard because we emotionally invest so much in all our clients, but a few programs stand out. Our work on ESPN’s Heisman House is remarkable because of sheer scale, complexity and inherent logistical challenges. Our USTA work, which showcased the US Open of Tomorrow exhibit, really pushed the design envelope. And our work for AT&T is constantly evolving to keep pace with technology and continue to integrate into the consumer experience.

How has technology changed the way you approach the business? 
The smart phone has dramatically changed the event landscape, and we’ve leveraged technology in creative and compelling ways. We strive to design a pre/during/post-event engagement via mobile and social channels because mobile technology shortens the time between brand engagement and purchase. I see a bright future for two-screen interactive experiences at events, where you use your personal device to play on larger screens, or to create physical action onsite. You’ll also see more photo opportunities designed for selfies, and a decline in green screen/photo booths. Finally, I think beacons, NFC and other pushes to mobile engagements will become more prevalent in 2015.

What publications/website do you find most relevant?
I always try to stay current with AdWeek, MediaPost, BrandWeek, etc. to understand the broader media world. I also read traditional Lifestyle Marketing media like Event Marketer, Sports Business Journal and BizBash. However, I think the single most relevant website I visit frequently is Reddit – it’s truly the “front page of the Internet.” Although it’s not always totally PC, no other website captures the current cultural zeitgeist like Reddit.

What are your favorite apps?
The ones I use routinely are pretty limited, but my essentials are Uber, Spotify, Delta Airlines, Waze (traffic in ATL sucks), Open Table, GolfNow and Instagram.

What excites you about psLIVE’s integration with MKTG INC?
I’m most excited about the combined potential of two agencies coming together. The whole is definitely greater than the sum of its parts, and I’m looking forward to what 2015 holds. We’re so culturally similar: the type of work we do, how we do it, and everyone I’ve met along the way has been great!

What do you do to relax?
With this job, and two active kids under 10 at home, relaxation comes in small doses. I’m a formerly avid golfer, fisherman, skier and sailor, so I try to vacation where I can combine at least a few of these. Also, cocktails.

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