Archive for the ‘BizBash’ tag

Tropicana Activation Featured on BizBash

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Post Originally Featured on BizBash:

Tropicana recently brought a bit of sunshine to New York, encouraging people to bring out their best selves. The juice brand hosted its #YourBestYou activation in Times Square from January 14 to 17, bringing to life the brand’s new platform—which is focused on positivity and optimism—as part of its relaunch for its 70th year. The activation offered consumers a variety of interactive experiences inspired by the brand relaunch.

The pop-up event, which was produced by MKTG, invited passersby to go inside of a domed tent that resembled an orange. Inside the tent, interactive experiences included video stations that allowed guests to create custom messages, picking out inspiring messages from an orange tree replica, and a green screen photo station that projected images with animated backgrounds on a Times Square billboard.

Here’s a look at the different ways Tropicana engaged consumers during the four-day event.

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Written by Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle
Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle

January 20th, 2017 at 4:23 pm

BizBash: How AT&T Brought Final Four Fans Inside the Game

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The brand’s immersive experience simulated the atmosphere of shooting a game-winning free throw.

By Mitra Sorrells Posted April 7, 2016, 7:00 AM EDT

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At the N.C.A.A. Final Four Fan Fest, AT&T invited guests to attempt a free throw while surrounded by sights and sounds that simulated the atmosphere of a game. (Credit: Team Epic)

 – March Madness is known for creating heart-stopping, awe-inspiring moments as 68 college basketball teams get whittled down to just one that is crowned the N.C.A.A. men’s basketball champion. For this year’s Final Four in Houston, Texas, N.C.A.A. sponsor AT&T worked with Team Epic and MKTG to create an immersive activation at the Final Four Fan Fest designed to help fans feel connected to the game, which ties to the brand’s marketing campaign.

“Our current campaign is all about the ‘Network of You’—how AT&T’s network is personalized and keeps you connected to the things that are important to you any time and any place,” said Enrique Casanova, vice president of Team Epic. “There is probably no other sporting event in this country that creates the roller coaster of emotions that the N.C.A.A. tournament does. So we wanted to see if there’s a way to capture that emotion in a tangible way and show people what it feels like, to give college basketball fans that very future-forward, connected experience.”

Read more here at BizBash.com

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

April 7th, 2016 at 12:08 pm

Q&A with psLIVE’s Peter Pearce

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Peter PearceFor this month’s Guest Column, we sat down with Peter Pearce, who heads up the Atlanta office for our new sister agency, psLIVE. Hear how he got where he is, where he’s going and why he loves his job.

Tell us about psLIVE – how do you describe the company to strangers?
My elevator pitch usually starts with defining “lifestyle marketing” (sports, entertainment, grassroots, retail) and who our clients are. Then I describe the work we do: Large-scale sponsorship activation, event development, mobile tours, sampling, street teams, staffing. You take it for granted because you live it every day, but the usual reaction is “that sounds like a lot of fun,” and it is!

What differentiates psLIVE from the competition? 
I think it all starts with our values – we live them every day. We are fiercely competitive, and our reputation for “doing it right” has followed us since inception. Secondly, the Dentsu Aegis push to collaborate across agency brands is a huge advantage – shared insights, tools and resources are a great business driver. Finally, we’re not just a creative, client-service and production agency. We are vertically integrated, with assets and services inhouse that many agencies outsource. This allows us to achieve budget efficiencies and get to market quickly.

What three words would you use to describe your staff?
Best. In. Class.

How did you get into this industry?
It’s sobering to realize I’ve been in the business for 18 years! I finished school and worked for the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games after school, then I began in the agency world at what is now CSE (formerly Career Sports Entertainment). After five years, I helped open the Atlanta office of Strategic Sports Group, where I spent another five years building that business. I’ve now been with psLIVE (formerly Vivid and Team Epic) for eight years, and it has been a great ride so far.

Looking back at 2014, do you have a few favorite programs or campaigns your teams managed?
That’s hard because we emotionally invest so much in all our clients, but a few programs stand out. Our work on ESPN’s Heisman House is remarkable because of sheer scale, complexity and inherent logistical challenges. Our USTA work, which showcased the US Open of Tomorrow exhibit, really pushed the design envelope. And our work for AT&T is constantly evolving to keep pace with technology and continue to integrate into the consumer experience.

How has technology changed the way you approach the business? 
The smart phone has dramatically changed the event landscape, and we’ve leveraged technology in creative and compelling ways. We strive to design a pre/during/post-event engagement via mobile and social channels because mobile technology shortens the time between brand engagement and purchase. I see a bright future for two-screen interactive experiences at events, where you use your personal device to play on larger screens, or to create physical action onsite. You’ll also see more photo opportunities designed for selfies, and a decline in green screen/photo booths. Finally, I think beacons, NFC and other pushes to mobile engagements will become more prevalent in 2015.

What publications/website do you find most relevant?
I always try to stay current with AdWeek, MediaPost, BrandWeek, etc. to understand the broader media world. I also read traditional Lifestyle Marketing media like Event Marketer, Sports Business Journal and BizBash. However, I think the single most relevant website I visit frequently is Reddit – it’s truly the “front page of the Internet.” Although it’s not always totally PC, no other website captures the current cultural zeitgeist like Reddit.

What are your favorite apps?
The ones I use routinely are pretty limited, but my essentials are Uber, Spotify, Delta Airlines, Waze (traffic in ATL sucks), Open Table, GolfNow and Instagram.

What excites you about psLIVE’s integration with MKTG INC?
I’m most excited about the combined potential of two agencies coming together. The whole is definitely greater than the sum of its parts, and I’m looking forward to what 2015 holds. We’re so culturally similar: the type of work we do, how we do it, and everyone I’ve met along the way has been great!

What do you do to relax?
With this job, and two active kids under 10 at home, relaxation comes in small doses. I’m a formerly avid golfer, fisherman, skier and sailor, so I try to vacation where I can combine at least a few of these. Also, cocktails.

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Getting Down to BIZBASH with David Adler (Part 2)

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Photo Courtesy of BizBashIn Part 2 of our Q&A with BizBash founder David Adler, we talk about the future of event marketing and he identifies 2014’s biggest industry innovations.

What are the 3 most innovative events you’ve seen this year?
The most impressive thing I’ve seen this year was the coat check line at the opening media party for the Super Bowl. It was a freezing cold night and thousands of execs were gathered at Chelsea Piers. The company coatchex.com used texting and QR codes as coat-check tickets — you took a picture of your code, then your phone number became your ticket number; this made the experience of retrieving your coat actually fun. As I was going to get my jacket, I got a text saying that my coat would be ready for me. It was one of those new ideas that gave me goosebumps.

I also liked the Summit Series, a conference started by a group of innovators who bought a mountaintop resort, turning it into a $100 million real estate deal. The event itself was a gateway into relationships that changed the world. Attendees interacted with everyone from astronauts to politicians to Internet billionaires. They also created the world’s largest collaborative dinner by hiking people into the mountains and creating a table for 1,000 people.

C2 Montreal has also been a game-changer. People who attend feel like they’re entering a whole new role of collaboration that invigorates, inspires and creates lasting relationships.

Some brands that we think are really capturing the power of the event are outlined in our Top 10 Innovative Brands of 2014 story.

How has the growth of mobile technology affected your business?
Mobile has been one of the most important developments in events. That, along with responsive design, has changed the game. Event professionals want to hold the world in their pocket, and the concept of photo sharing has changed events—because ROI can now be judged not by the people in the room, but by the application of those people.

I’m reminded of the book The Mobile Wave, which talks about going up to a tombstone, holding up your phone, and having augmented reality show every video and article about that person. Imagine doing that in a live room just by wearing Google Glass or another device.

What do you envision to be the next trend or industry shift?
An empowered attendee is the next big thing. With new technology, we are seeing more power in the hands of the attendee. Now, the attendee needs to know how to be a great guest, and use it. They need to interact with other people to get the most out of the event, and they really have to want to be there.

Previously, I was the VP of corporate communications for major companies and spent hours preparing CEOs for events. We would collect guest bios and provide strategies on how to get what we wanted from them. Now with the advent of things like event apps, attendees have more power than ever, and can use the tools created by organizers to enhance their experience.

Youve said that one of your interests is using events as a philanthropic tool. What does that mean to you?
I believe in the concept of managed serendipity. Get the right people in the room, inspire them, show them how other people are using collaboration, and people will get on board to help your cause. There’s nothing like face-to-face events to motivate people. In Simon Sinek’s TED-talk, he says great leaders don’t have plans, they have dreams. He also says that people don’t buy what you do, they buy why you are doing it. Events are a natural gathering place for people who want to follow their hearts, rub elbows and share experiences.

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Using RFID to Improve the Customer Experience

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Photo courtesy of Tomorrowland.com

Today, RFID technology is so much more than an IPass or a race-timer. The technology has changed the way big corporations such as Wal-Mart handle their supply chain management, the way retail stores prevent shoplifting, and the way experiential marketers make use of their spaces. Here are a few ways events are utilizing RFID technology to improve experiences:

Tomorrowland Music Festival:
This Belgium music festival took to the wristband trend over the traditional admission ticket. When guests received their wristbands in the mail they could register their band to connect with their Facebook page. During the course of the two-weekend event, if any two guests pressed the button on their wristband at the same time while they were close to one another, the other person’s Facebook info would be shared via email. Every day that the guest attended the festival, they received an email of all the people they met that day.

Photo courtesy of TasteofToronto.com

Photo courtesy of TasteofToronto.com

Taste of Toronto:
The Taste of Toronto used RFID a little differently than just an admission ticket. They said goodbye to the dated ticket method for paying for food and drinks and instead provided each attendee with an RFID card. The guests could load money on the card and use it to pay for all food and drinks at the event. At the end of the day, if there was money left over on the card it was donated to Second Harvest Food Rescue.

C2MTL:
C2MTL, the Commerce and Creativity conference in Montreal, used UHF tags (similar to RFID but functions from as far away as 30 feet) to help staff the event. The tags were on each badge of the guests and the chandeliers were UHF-enabled to receive information from the guests’ badges. Producers knew when people entered the building and passed security successfully, and they also knew when to add extra staff to popular food stations.

Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival:
Bonnaroo draws thousands of guests to Tennessee each June. Guests registered their RFID wristbands online before attending the event, and in Bonnaroo’s partnering with Microsoft, linked them with a Microsoft OneDrive account. Every time the guest visited a photobooth or viewed a performance, they could scan their RFID band and have photos sent and saved to their account.

Checkout more smart uses of RFID in the BizBash article “6 Events Using R.F.I.D. Technology to Improve the Guest Experience.”

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Getting Down to BizBash with David Adler

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David_Adler.jpgFounded in 2000, BizBash is the leading trade media for the event industry. BizBash publishes magazines and e-newsletters, hosts websites, and produces trade shows and award shows for event professionals. In this two-part Q&A, we sat down with its founder and CEO, David Adler, to discuss tips, trends and his favorite events of 2014.

You are 100% engrossed in events. What attracted you to the business?
In the late ‘70s I started a society magazine called Washington Dossier in Washington, D.C. It was so fascinating to go to events with politicians, White House officials and Washingtonians who were more interested in events than they were in their day jobs. I learned that political organizers are really event organizers. They loved getting people in a room and using every trick in the book to persuade them to their point of view. It was the intersection of public relations and face-to-face events; I saw that people listen when they’re not distracted, and at events you’re forced to listen to the person standing face-to-face with you.

What do you think is the one essential element of every really great event?
Every event detail is designed to make people remember where they were, what they did, who they talked to, and what they gained. BizBash president Richard Aaron feels that all event organizers should be “memorologists,” creating moments that people actually remember.

One essential element for event organizers is to understand the neuroscience of events. They need to know what colors create an impact on the mind, how music changes the way we think, how scent affects how we feel. The science of events studies how the mind works and how people interact.

What to you are the most important objectives of any good event?
The goal is to get the right people to your event; getting to that point is harder than it looks. You need great audience generation, a reason for them to stay, and something that stimulates conversation and creates a shareable, indelible impression. In the old days, that was done through word-of-mouth conversations; today we have social media to help amplify our message.

Most events want to accomplish three basic things:

1. To sell things to others (ideas, products, or concepts)
2. To motivate people to sell things to desired audiences
3. To create networks of people who are motivated around a concept so the word can be spread

Even the most fun event has some sort of agenda. Understanding your agenda is now part of the strategy for event organizing and event marketing.

How has the industry changed in the last 10 years?
The most important thing is that the event industry is now really being taken seriously. I used to say that people in the event industry always had to sit at the children’s table. Now, 25% of marketing budgets are allocated for events—we are beginning to really understand the science of how people interact and the power of that interaction.

Really brilliant planners are studying everything from registration and ticketing, to the experience of being at an event, to the post-event ROI. Marketers are using innovations and activations to create conversations. People like Alex Pentland, who wrote the book Social Physics: How Good Ideas Spread, are reinventing the power of interactions and conversations, as they have the power to change the world. It’s important to note that we are no longer hosting events for the people in the room, but rather for their social networks. Social media has been the ultimate game-changer.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to get into this business?
I’d say that understanding neuroscience is one of the key learnings to being an amazing event organizer. I call event organizers “programmers of human interaction;” having the skills of understanding human behavior and putting those practices into action for events. I find that people involved in their school and college activities naturally seem to gravitate towards events. They understand the importance of human interaction.

It’s also important to be a bit of an extrovert, being able to effortlessly talk to people. It’s a lost art, and the most impressive people are the impresarios who know how to connect people. Connectors are natural event organizers.

Another great attribute for somebody who wants to get into the business is to be an expert on the concept of “surprise and delight.” Understanding strategy and being able to be creative, as well as organized, is a very important skill.

Stay tuned for Part 2!

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Charlie Horsey’s Been BIZZY

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img-6612Photo Credit: BizBash.com

MKTG INC Chairman & CEO Charlie Horsey recently sat down with BizBash to discuss Super Fans and the steps companies are taking to embrace them. What’s a Super Fan and why should you care about them?

Read more here: “Why Event Marketers Are Focusing on Super Fans” & “8 Tips for Creating Events for Super Fans

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

September 19th, 2013 at 3:48 pm