Archive for the ‘Dentsu’ tag

MKTG Canada weighs in on Super Bowl ads and value for Canadian brands

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Matthew Klar, Director of Strategy at recently acquired sports and entertainment sponsorship consultancy S&E Sponsorship shares some fresh insights on Super Bowl ads in the new media context that has seen for the first time U.S. ads broadcast on the American feed in Canada.

Last night’s Super Bowl 51 was a momentous game on many counts. The event saw the first overtime minutes played during a Super Bowl and the New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady coming back in the fourth quarter to earn a record fifth championship ring.

With the dropping of simultaneous substitution, it was also the first night that U.S. ads appeared on the American feed in Canada. The appeal from Bell and NFL Canada against the CRTC’s order is being heard tomorrow, so it remains to be seen if the U.S. commercials will be seen in Canada going forward.

The pundits MiC tapped all chose to watch the U.S. feed. Read on to find out why, as well as their favourite ads and whether they see a value in Canadian brands continuing to buy into the game.

 

Click here to read the rest of the article

This article was originally published in Media in Canada

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Written by Paige McConney
Paige McConney

February 6th, 2017 at 4:08 pm

MKTG CEO Charlie Horsey Summits Mt. Fuji in Japan

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Yesterday, our CEO Charlie Horsey joined a group of executives and new staff from around the globe to partake in an annual climb of Mt. Fuji. Learn more about this tradition at Dentsu Aegis Network from the AdAge article below.

MKTG CEO Charlie Horsey (l), Rob Horler CEO Dentsu Aegis Network USA (center in hood) and other leaders on Mt. Fuji in Japan

MKTG CEO Charlie Horsey (l), Rob Horler CEO Dentsu Aegis Network USA (center in hood) and other leaders on Mt. Fuji in Japan. The ritual started in 1925. Every July, Dentsu’s young hires and newly promoted executives climb Mt. Fuji, elevation 12,388 feet. From afternoon into the night, they navigate volcanic rock and ash to reach the summit for sunrise around 4:30 a.m.

 adageHow Japan’s Dentsu Climbed to the Top of the Agency World

Dentsu Does Things Differently, From Scaling Mountains to Sending a Robot Into Outer Space

By . Published on .

The ritual started in 1925. Every July, Dentsu’s young hires and newly promoted executives climb Mt. Fuji, elevation 12,388 feet. From afternoon into the night, they navigate volcanic rock and ash to reach the summit for sunrise around 4:30 a.m.

Tim Andree, a 6-foot-11 American executive, climbed in 2007, joining a pack of mostly Japanese 20-somethings. The Dentsu Inc. exec VP recalls awaiting dawn with 100 new hires and a few senior employees in a rest hut.

“You’re kind of jam-packed, and there were four executives kind of spooning each other on two tatami mats — it was close quarters,” Mr. Andree said.

Once there, exhausted climbers write postcards to clients and send them from the summit’s post office. Another tradition is prayer: “I prayed in front of the Shinto shrine for the success of my clients and Dentsu,” Mr. Andree recalled.

It’s clear the Japanese agency has taken a very different path to get to its current position: Dentsu Inc. is No. 5 in Advertising Age’s ranking of the largest agency companies. Yet western ad giants don’t ask employees to literally climb mountains and pray for clients’ prosperity.

Read more here

provided by MKTG Global Communication Team

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

July 21st, 2016 at 11:27 am

UK: psLIVE and Denstu Aegis Network Sport and Entertainment (DANSE) Rebrand as MKTG

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Screen Shot 2016-05-26 at 9.59.10 AM

Stephen Whyte, CEO MKTG UK and Posterscope UK

Experiential agency psLIVE and partnership and sponsorship marketing agency Dentsu Aegis Network Sports & Entertainment (DANSE) have united and rebranded as MKTG UK.

This follows the 2014 Dentsu Aegis Network acquisition of US-based lifestyle marketing agency MKTG, which now makes up one of Dentsu Aegis Network’s nine global brands.

MKTG UK combines the expertise of psLIVE and DANSE under the leadership of MKTG UK and Posterscope CEO Stephen Whyte, supported by brand experience managing director Michael Brown and sports & entertainment managing director David Peters.

The rebrand is part of a strategic decision to leverage the capabilities of both agency teams with a global offering, providing creative, technology, data & media capabilities.

MKTG UK CEO Stephen Whyte said: “psLIVE and DANSE provide complementary expertise across activations, events, experiential and sponsorships. Joining both agencies together as MKTG UK will strengthen our ability to deliver best in class, innovative campaigns and projects and enable us to deliver both globally and locally for clients.”

Read more at https://www.sportindustry.biz/news/pslive-and-danse-rebrand-mktg-uk#SBfOSopIPRwkxEvV.99

credit: SportIndustry Group UK

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

May 26th, 2016 at 10:00 am

Dentsu Acquires Olympic Broadcast Rights

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mediapost

 

Dentsu has acquired the Olympic media rights to the 2018, 2020, 2022 and 2024 Olympic Games for 22 Asian countries, the Tokyo-based ad-marketing holding company confirmed this week. The rights acquired cover all media platforms including TV, radio and the Internet.

The countries include Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Afghanistan, Indonesia, Iran, Thailand and others. Earlier, the company acquired similar rights for the same countries to the upcoming Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Typically after acquiring rights, Dentsu resells them to local broadcasters with packages that also include advertising sponsors.

In addition to the Olympics, Dentsu has made other recent forays into the sports arena. In May it agreed to acquire a one-third stake in Laguna Hills, CA-based sports agency Athletes First for $16.5 million.

It also controls both MKTG and Team Epic (via Dentsu Aegis Network), which specialize in sports sponsorships and event marketing for clients including Nike, IBM and FedEx.

Earlier this year, Dentsu was selected as the agency of record for the Tokyo Summer Olympics (2020) and Paralympic Games.

The 2018 Winter Games are set for PyeongChang, Republic of Korea. Sites for the 2022 Winter Games and 2024 Summer Olympics are yet to be determined. Earlier this week the city of Boston withdrew its bid for the 2024 games after organizers determined that a majority of residents were not willing to support the effort.

by Steve McClellan @mp_mcclellan, July 39, 3:47 PM

 

 

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

July 31st, 2015 at 10:57 am

If You’re Not A Start-Up, You’re A Turnaround

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This article is by Nigel Morris, CEO of Dentsu Aegis Network Americas & EMEA.

This summer something profound is happening in the economy, with around $30 billion of media and marketing services in review simultaneously from many of the world’s biggest companies. This is because soon we will look back on 2014 as the year the digital economy became dominant.

Where previously digital businesses had to fit into an analog economy defined by the dynamics of the 20th Century, established businesses must now fit into a digital one.

This has accelerated the pace of start-up entrants in almost every sector. They are leveraging the digital economy’s dynamics and lack of legacy in the old model, and threaten to take down some of the world’s strongest global companies. Near-perfect competition is creating huge opportunities and disrupting almost every business sector – as well as society and culture.

How fundamentally different is this digital economy?

Consider that in January a San Francisco-based grocery delivery startup, Instacart, raised $220 million with a pitch to investors that was, in short: We have nothing. Instacart CEO Apoorva Mehta told The New York Times, “We don’t hold inventory, we don’t own warehouses, we don’t own trucks. The changes we make are software changes.”

Meanwhile, last summer, 600,000 football fans traveled to Brazil for the World Cup and about 120,000 of them stayed in accommodation through the Airbnb network. A seven-year-old company that doesn’t own any inventory is now one of the biggest challenges facing hospitality brands that have been around for decades. It has no rooms, it buys no soap, it launders no towels.

But companies such as these do have something very valuable: people.

The reason startups such as Airbnb and Uber have become so disruptive so rapidly without traditional sources of competitive advantage is that they’re designed to take advantage of the connected infrastructure of the digital economy.

They don’t just have a base of customers or consumers that can be defined by a share of market; they have scaled networks of connected people. These networks match demand and supply, an important step toward perfect competition and a big reason the digital economy is so different and disruptive.

Another important way of thinking about this is that they are “Audience Businesses;” only the audiences are dynamic, rapidly growing and the source of the asset values of everyone from Facebook to Nextdoor. And with every action their customers take, they learn more about them and what they need or want.

In a digital economy, value is created through networks of connected people. They form with or without a company’s involvement, primarily through social channels and digital media, where the vast majority of contact between companies and their customers is migrating. Already these networks have changed the relationship between consumers and brands. The opportunity now they need to be activated at scale by established organizations and become core to the way they operate. Primarily through their brands, they must become “audience”—a core business discipline treated now as a passive group of people to market to, but an organic asset to be nurtured, activated and monetized.

Data management and marketing are key to driving this transformation as digital media not only delivers information or messages but also sells and even generates products as brand engagement and business transaction converge. And it generates data. Every action creates a data point and behind every data point is a person.

As digital media and data grow more important, marketing is also transformed to become the sensor of the organization and critical to the success of the whole business.

As the regional president of a Fortune 100 company said at one of our recent Innovation Summits: “Marketing is way too important to just leave to the marketing team.”

Smart businesses will move away from existing marketing and research methodologies and instead listen to the data, which powers the sensor and enables the organization to respond. Companies will be able to deliver products, services and communication that people want, not simply sell them what has been produced, enabling them to be much more resource-efficient, which is not only good for the bottom line but for society as a whole. This is a real potential benefit of the digital economy and a fresh narrative on the issue of data.

Click here to read the rest of the story!

 

*Article originally posted by www.forbes.com 

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

July 20th, 2015 at 2:30 pm

MKTG INC @ Cannes Lions 2015

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A team from MKTG INC recently traveled to the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity. The festival is the annual mecca for the global marketing communications industry, with the most powerful brands, media outlets, agencies of all kinds (advertising, PR, experiential, digital, technology, data, social, mobile, creative, and many many others) – approximately 15,000 people, flocking to Cannes to network, to visit brand experiences, to close major deals, to learn, to meet a lot of people, and in many cases take home some hardware.

Sure, the setting is seriously glorious, but it is honestly a beast of a week. Think Sundance or CES…at the beach…in the South of France, in the summer. You are running, watching a panel on a rooftop in 85 degree heat, then running into a freezing cold conference room and back again, and grabbing food along the way, usually until sundown when things slow up a bit.

Luckily, my friend Julie Thompson, a 16-year Cannes Lions veteran, wrote this hugely insightful article for Adweek, that I used as gospel to make sure I made the most of my four days in Cannes. Even with Julie’s help, I still overbooked myself, but not complaining.

Between the client and press meetings at our home base, the Dentsu Aegis Beach House, panels, Q&As, creative showcases, press sit-downs, more panels from Adweek, Medialink, digiday, LinkedIn and visits to Google Beach, Facebook’s Hacker Square, and my favorite stop, The Girls Lounge, I averaged 22,000 steps a day according to my trusty companion, my FitBit.

Anyway, rather than yarn on, I figured I’d share with you some photos I snapped along the way:

 

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