Archive for the ‘Digital’ tag

MKTG Insights: WHAT SPONSORS CAN LEARN FROM MODERN ALBUM RELEASES

with one comment

With the overly saturated music industry experiencing ever-changing shifts in music consumption, artists must find unique ways to gain traction within the market in order to create successful campaigns. Technological innovations such as digital streaming provided by service giants such as Spotify and Apple Music are truly shaping the industry. There is now a greater accessibility to music than ever before and artists can easily get lost in the clutter. The days where studios and labels put mass advertising behind the release of an album are gone. This has caused musicians to increasingly think like brands; relying on creativity and innovation to drive interest in their upcoming sales. Sponsors and marketers also live in a similar dynamic realm where there are constant technological changes and never ending clutter of branded content. The following are leading examples from the music industry that provide key learnings for marketers in today’s world.

In June 2017, in advance of the release of her “Witness” album, Katy Perry partnered with YouTube to launch a 96-hour live stream of her living day-to-day in a camera filled “Big Brother” style home. The live stream allowed fans to observe Perry in a range of content from average daily activities to more intense moments such as therapy sessions. The broadcast was supported with celebrity guest appearances who interacted with Katy for interviews, cooking, games, challenges, and conversations. The live stream led to a concert where Katy performed songs from the upcoming album. The Katy Perry Witness World Wide Live Stream reached 190 countries and garnered 49 million views.

Katy Perry provided fans with an opportunity to receive unprecedented access to celebrity. The raw, constant transparency that a live stream provides allows consumers to feel an authentic connection by being able to tune into an “unscripted” experience.

For sponsorship marketers, Perry’s stunt is a reminder of key operating principles when developing strategy and planning brand experiences. Perry understood the power of designing a brand experience that would organically drive social chatter. Rather than rely on media appearances on TV and radio to plug the album release like most artists, Perry’s live stream was designed for the digital age. By choosing the correct platform, in this case, YouTube, users were able to connect at any time (mobile, desktop etc.) for real-time interactions. The tactic of live streaming her activity scaled access to Perry in a way that transcended geographic borders and time constraints; sponsors planning physical branded experiences must also find ways to bring the consumer experience to those unable to engage in the precise time and place of the activation.

Notable hip-hop stars 2 Chainz and Kendrick Lamar are examples of artists who have utilized powerful physical, in-person brand experiences that coincide with particular promotional announcements. 2 Chainz released his fourth studio album titled “Pretty Girls like Trap Music” in June 2017 which was supported by a unique physical activation. Inspired by the emerging genre of Southern “trap music” that has been taking control of mainstream airways, 2 Chainz leverages “trap” roots by replicating a real life “trap house” in the outskirts of Atlanta, Georgia. The album themed, pink home is decked out with urban artwork and was redesigned to coincide with 2 Chainz branding and larger promotional campaign that matches 2 Chainz album art.

The activation’s main purpose was to be used as a space for listening parties. Supplementary, outside of the home, was a strategically place vintage pink Corvette and stove where visitors were encouraged to take photos and share their “trap experience” on social media. The activation was an enormous tourist and fan attraction, covered by major media outlets that accumulated over 300,000 digital tags.

Similarly, Kendrick Lamar kicked off “THE DAMN. TOUR” by launching retail pop-up shops in select cities that coincide with his tour dates. The pop-up shops sell limited-edition Kendrick branded clothing and accessories. Activations amplify traditional marketing efforts by providing a memorable and engaging consumer experience. Consumers are able to interact on a ground-level and share digitally. This activation style allows for ultimate consumer engagement that is enhanced with wide-spread media coverage.

High-touch activations act as a unique tactic to engage consumers by utilizing multiple touchpoints. These activations allow artists to push branded content online while also providing fans with a real and tangible interaction. Aside from relying solely on social media, high-touch activation experiences allow brands stand out amongst the clutter.

One of the most talked about releases in 2016 was Beyoncé’s sixth studio album, Lemonade. The surprise release was supported by a massive amount of content: a one hour HBO film, an eleven chapter visual album, and the launch of the Formation World Tour. Beyoncé leveraged a combination of art, music, poetry, and politics to create one of 2016’s best-selling albums that had a large impact in a variety of markets that surpassed the category of music.

The element of surprise can be one of the strongest marketing techniques. Brands that execute this type of disruptive promotion cause a change consumer behavior and trigger some of the strongest personal and digital dialogues. Due to the unexpected release, consumer behavior is altered and now brand focused. Fans and consumers erupt in a sense of urgency to dive deep into the branded content. This social eruption causes word-of-mouth marketing, which is seen as one of the top forms of influential advertising. Awareness is built exponentially, consumer emotions are supercharged and a passionate brand engagement is created.

With the recent need for artists to stand out with successful campaigns, the market is seeing a shift in promotional techniques from brands within the industry. Traditional efforts must now be altered and amplified with unique activations, disruptive marketing and brand authentication in order to create more of an impact.  By leveraging these case studies and insights, marketers can truly enhance a variety of brand experiences.

Share Button

Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

July 31st, 2017 at 12:58 pm

MKTG4GOOD: MKTG San Francisco | Adopt a Family

with one comment

v3_adoptafamilybanner_2_afb-01

For the past month, the San Francisco office has been working with Adopt a Family as part of our annual winter corporate social responsibility event. Adopt a Family is a non-profit organization that pairs families in need with donors (like us!) and the donors  follow a wishlist and shop for holiday gifts for the families. 

We received two families to support so we split the West Coast team (this included everyone in LA and our gals currently working in NY) up. We arranged as a little friendly competition and the teams signed up for items and shopped. Earlier this week, we gathered all of the gifts in San Fran and spent much of the day gift wrapping and getting everything ready to hand over to these amazing families. Take a look! 

Share Button

Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

December 7th, 2016 at 1:44 pm

Pokémon Go & All That: Is Your Live Event Digitally Optimized?

with one comment

screen-shot-2016-09-12-at-4-50-55-pm

Photo courtesy of Event Magazine

MKTG UK Managing Director Michael Brown pens his views on the Pokémon Go craze and digitally optimized live events.  He explores what a new experiential agency should look like if it set up business right now.

Head to Event Magazine for the article here

 

Article by: Michael Brown for Event Magazine

Share Button

Written by Andrea D'Alessandro
Andrea D'Alessandro

September 12th, 2016 at 4:54 pm

If You’re Not A Start-Up, You’re A Turnaround

with one comment

forbeslogo

This article is by Nigel Morris, CEO of Dentsu Aegis Network Americas & EMEA.

This summer something profound is happening in the economy, with around $30 billion of media and marketing services in review simultaneously from many of the world’s biggest companies. This is because soon we will look back on 2014 as the year the digital economy became dominant.

Where previously digital businesses had to fit into an analog economy defined by the dynamics of the 20th Century, established businesses must now fit into a digital one.

This has accelerated the pace of start-up entrants in almost every sector. They are leveraging the digital economy’s dynamics and lack of legacy in the old model, and threaten to take down some of the world’s strongest global companies. Near-perfect competition is creating huge opportunities and disrupting almost every business sector – as well as society and culture.

How fundamentally different is this digital economy?

Consider that in January a San Francisco-based grocery delivery startup, Instacart, raised $220 million with a pitch to investors that was, in short: We have nothing. Instacart CEO Apoorva Mehta told The New York Times, “We don’t hold inventory, we don’t own warehouses, we don’t own trucks. The changes we make are software changes.”

Meanwhile, last summer, 600,000 football fans traveled to Brazil for the World Cup and about 120,000 of them stayed in accommodation through the Airbnb network. A seven-year-old company that doesn’t own any inventory is now one of the biggest challenges facing hospitality brands that have been around for decades. It has no rooms, it buys no soap, it launders no towels.

But companies such as these do have something very valuable: people.

The reason startups such as Airbnb and Uber have become so disruptive so rapidly without traditional sources of competitive advantage is that they’re designed to take advantage of the connected infrastructure of the digital economy.

They don’t just have a base of customers or consumers that can be defined by a share of market; they have scaled networks of connected people. These networks match demand and supply, an important step toward perfect competition and a big reason the digital economy is so different and disruptive.

Another important way of thinking about this is that they are “Audience Businesses;” only the audiences are dynamic, rapidly growing and the source of the asset values of everyone from Facebook to Nextdoor. And with every action their customers take, they learn more about them and what they need or want.

In a digital economy, value is created through networks of connected people. They form with or without a company’s involvement, primarily through social channels and digital media, where the vast majority of contact between companies and their customers is migrating. Already these networks have changed the relationship between consumers and brands. The opportunity now they need to be activated at scale by established organizations and become core to the way they operate. Primarily through their brands, they must become “audience”—a core business discipline treated now as a passive group of people to market to, but an organic asset to be nurtured, activated and monetized.

Data management and marketing are key to driving this transformation as digital media not only delivers information or messages but also sells and even generates products as brand engagement and business transaction converge. And it generates data. Every action creates a data point and behind every data point is a person.

As digital media and data grow more important, marketing is also transformed to become the sensor of the organization and critical to the success of the whole business.

As the regional president of a Fortune 100 company said at one of our recent Innovation Summits: “Marketing is way too important to just leave to the marketing team.”

Smart businesses will move away from existing marketing and research methodologies and instead listen to the data, which powers the sensor and enables the organization to respond. Companies will be able to deliver products, services and communication that people want, not simply sell them what has been produced, enabling them to be much more resource-efficient, which is not only good for the bottom line but for society as a whole. This is a real potential benefit of the digital economy and a fresh narrative on the issue of data.

Click here to read the rest of the story!

 

*Article originally posted by www.forbes.com 

Share Button

Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

July 20th, 2015 at 2:30 pm

3 Key Learnings from Digital Summit Atlanta 2015

without comments

DS2

Digital Summit Atlanta, a gathering of some of the most forward thinkers in digital marketing, took place this week and I was proud to make it my 3rd time in attendance. Each year I have been able to discover new topics and discuss the next trends in digital marketing.

Overall, each year has followed its own theme as digital marketing as a whole evolves so quickly. In 2013, trends in how social media was changing for brands was explored in a lot of sessions. Last year it shifted to a major focus on content marketing and SEO. Now, at #DSUM15, the next stage in UX (User Experience) design seemed to be the key focus.

And with that, here are three key takeaways from the conference as it can relate to what we do in the experiential space…

1. Humanizing UX

Many of the sessions at Digital Summit really focused on UX as we were challenged to think of what was next in the field. For example, how do we run UX more lean and understand better, powered with ‘big data’, how to humanize someone’s digital experience. When we map out the consumer journey – remember that each user is an actual person with problems and needs.

When you look at bring a consumer through a brand experience for experiential this line of thinking makes a lot of sense, right? It is our expertise to bring brands to life in a way that they can interact with consumers as people and not anonymous IP addresses. However many activation designs we see in the field could do a better job from at the ideation stage to keep in mind that once launched, these are people with their own objectives who will walk through our ideas.

So when thinking through your consumer experience idea, map it out. Literally draw out each stage of the activation UX and use this tool to identify where the gaps are or more importantly, where it can be more streamlined.

2. Millennials are mobile-first…and are starting to earn a lot of money

When you hear the word “millennials” – how old of a person pops in your mind? Probably an early-20-something with new student debt maybe? Well consider that millennials are were born starting in 1980 and now are entering their mid-30s. Sure there is probably a healthy amount of debt still lingering – but this generation is now entering over a $Trillion in buying power and loves to spend.

So with all of this data we now have on the ‘Connected Generation’ – what have we learned about marketing to them? It’s a long answer but here are two quick tips from @annieg from StumbleUpon.

First, “6 is the new 60” – as in the 6” phone is more important than the 60” TV. Now that doesn’t mean the generation is consumer less video – in fact it’s more than ever. But reportedly 33% do not watch any broadcast TV.

Second, it seems obvious that millennials are connected to their mobile devices, sure, but how many experiences are being built mobile-first? When we consider social, if you stop to think why they are so effective with the connected generation it’s not just because they are social – but because the most popular experiences are mobile-first. Snapchat, Instagram, Vine…some of the most powerful platforms for the younger Millennials have excelled by being native to the 6” screen. So consider mobile-first experiences to connect and make an engagement that this group wants to use. After all, it is why the younger Millennials are now being known as Social Natives.

3. The Entrepreneur Wants to Solve a Problem

I heard a great line this year and it came during a keynote speaker Chris Brogan, whose content I highly recommend. To summarize:

Stop chasing innovation, which aims to just do something.

Be an entrepreneur, which aims to solve someone’s problem.

While this is absolutely a trap in creating the latest in digital experiences, it is also a trap in experiential marketing. Brands and agencies alike all want to innovate and create and truly great new things are activated in our space every year. But when coming up the ideas for the experience on the front end, don’t just try to chase an innovation for the sake of doing it. Instead, identify an audience’s problem and solve it. That is where the entrepreneurship mindset excels and where experiential marketing can truly make an in-person impact on someone.

If you are ever free in May, I highly recommend Digital Summit. This is only a small snipet of content from the 2-day conference. I still have to go through pages upon pages of notes but in the meantime, enjoy the learnings and feel free to find me @BradMEpstein if you want to go through my timeline where I shared some more real-time leanrings!

Bonus! PowerPoint is where data goes to die!

If you work with data (you should!) treat it as a living, breathing source. PowerPoint it becomes static and if 2015 taught me anything – is that static is kryptonite for the modern marketer. So learn new tools that keep you agile and keep your brand’s marketing velocity as fast as possible.

Share Button

Take Your Best Shot, At Best Buy

with 2 comments

Al Diaz Best Buy Photoworkshop[1]
With today’s digital trends being what they are, a picture is probably worth far more than just a thousand words, right?

That’s what Best Buy thinks, anyway. So in select US stores, Best Buy has expanded its photography offerings into the DSLR category. But buying a DSLR camera can be intimidating, so the company teamed up with MKTG INC to offer complimentary DSLR photography workshops every Sunday morning in January, at 15 Best Buy locations nationwide.

The workshops featured top-tier professional instructors, including the Salt Lake City Tribune’s chief photographer as well as Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston’s wedding photographer. Despite the high level of instruction, the workshops targeted every level of photographer, from beginner to devoted hobbyist, by offering personalized, hands-on instruction on everything from portraiture to action shots, low-light situations and close-ups. Attendees learned how to set up their cameras for each type of shot, and they got bonus tips from the experts on how to ensure a picture-perfect photograph every time.

Share Button