Archive for the ‘Instagram’ tag

PGA Championship 2016: Recap

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Jordan Spieth signing autographs for fans on the last day of practice rounds which also happened to be his 23rd Birthday.

Jordan Spieth signing autographs for fans on the last day of practice rounds, which also happened to be his 23rd Birthday.

From July 25-31, MKTG hosted dozens of our clients and partners at the 2016 PGA Championship in our private VIP hospitality suite within the historic Club House at Baltusrol. Despite the hot and humid forecast, we all had a blast traversing the course catching some world-class golf.

We also all witnessed history as Jimmy Walker took home his first major title finishing -14 and holding on to the lead the entire time. Walker became the first wire-to-wire winner of the PGA Championship since Phil Mickelson, who won at Baltusrol in 2005. In fact, all four majors this year were won by first-timers including Masters champion Danny Willett; Dustin Johnson, who won the United States Open; and Henrik Stenson, the British Open champ. Walker had missed the cut in his last two majors, never finished higher than tied for seventh at any major and was perhaps best known on the PGA Tour for his unusual hobby: astrophotography, according to the New York Times.

In addition to witnessing Walker’s triumph, we saw reigning PGA Champion Jason Day, the world’s top ranked golfer, make the final holes crazy intense on Sunday , and even got up close and personal with stars like Jordan Spieth, Rory McIlroy, Dustin Johnson, John Daly, among others. Check out our snaps below and on Instagram and Snapchat.

 

-Contributed by MKTG New York summer intern Dan Andree

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Super Bowl 50…That’s a Wrap!

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And that’s a wrap!!

Huge shout out to the totally tireless, amazing MKTG and Team Epic team effort out in San Francisco in pulling off no less than dozens of truly awesome activations.

In case you missed it, we’ve kept our social feeds active with content from the week including our very own video content series called “Theo on the Street” that we’ve posted to our brand new YouTube Channel as well as Facebook, Instagram, etc. Check it out below!

 Theo on the Street: Super Bowl City & Levi’s Lot

Theo on the Street: NFL Experience

Be sure to follow all of our social channels below! This was for sure our best Super Bowl yet!
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/MKTG_INC
FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/MKTGINC
INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/mktg_inc/
BLOG: http://blg.mktg.com
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Written by Paige McConney
Paige McConney

February 8th, 2016 at 2:10 pm

3 Key Learnings from Digital Summit Atlanta 2015

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DS2

Digital Summit Atlanta, a gathering of some of the most forward thinkers in digital marketing, took place this week and I was proud to make it my 3rd time in attendance. Each year I have been able to discover new topics and discuss the next trends in digital marketing.

Overall, each year has followed its own theme as digital marketing as a whole evolves so quickly. In 2013, trends in how social media was changing for brands was explored in a lot of sessions. Last year it shifted to a major focus on content marketing and SEO. Now, at #DSUM15, the next stage in UX (User Experience) design seemed to be the key focus.

And with that, here are three key takeaways from the conference as it can relate to what we do in the experiential space…

1. Humanizing UX

Many of the sessions at Digital Summit really focused on UX as we were challenged to think of what was next in the field. For example, how do we run UX more lean and understand better, powered with ‘big data’, how to humanize someone’s digital experience. When we map out the consumer journey – remember that each user is an actual person with problems and needs.

When you look at bring a consumer through a brand experience for experiential this line of thinking makes a lot of sense, right? It is our expertise to bring brands to life in a way that they can interact with consumers as people and not anonymous IP addresses. However many activation designs we see in the field could do a better job from at the ideation stage to keep in mind that once launched, these are people with their own objectives who will walk through our ideas.

So when thinking through your consumer experience idea, map it out. Literally draw out each stage of the activation UX and use this tool to identify where the gaps are or more importantly, where it can be more streamlined.

2. Millennials are mobile-first…and are starting to earn a lot of money

When you hear the word “millennials” – how old of a person pops in your mind? Probably an early-20-something with new student debt maybe? Well consider that millennials are were born starting in 1980 and now are entering their mid-30s. Sure there is probably a healthy amount of debt still lingering – but this generation is now entering over a $Trillion in buying power and loves to spend.

So with all of this data we now have on the ‘Connected Generation’ – what have we learned about marketing to them? It’s a long answer but here are two quick tips from @annieg from StumbleUpon.

First, “6 is the new 60” – as in the 6” phone is more important than the 60” TV. Now that doesn’t mean the generation is consumer less video – in fact it’s more than ever. But reportedly 33% do not watch any broadcast TV.

Second, it seems obvious that millennials are connected to their mobile devices, sure, but how many experiences are being built mobile-first? When we consider social, if you stop to think why they are so effective with the connected generation it’s not just because they are social – but because the most popular experiences are mobile-first. Snapchat, Instagram, Vine…some of the most powerful platforms for the younger Millennials have excelled by being native to the 6” screen. So consider mobile-first experiences to connect and make an engagement that this group wants to use. After all, it is why the younger Millennials are now being known as Social Natives.

3. The Entrepreneur Wants to Solve a Problem

I heard a great line this year and it came during a keynote speaker Chris Brogan, whose content I highly recommend. To summarize:

Stop chasing innovation, which aims to just do something.

Be an entrepreneur, which aims to solve someone’s problem.

While this is absolutely a trap in creating the latest in digital experiences, it is also a trap in experiential marketing. Brands and agencies alike all want to innovate and create and truly great new things are activated in our space every year. But when coming up the ideas for the experience on the front end, don’t just try to chase an innovation for the sake of doing it. Instead, identify an audience’s problem and solve it. That is where the entrepreneurship mindset excels and where experiential marketing can truly make an in-person impact on someone.

If you are ever free in May, I highly recommend Digital Summit. This is only a small snipet of content from the 2-day conference. I still have to go through pages upon pages of notes but in the meantime, enjoy the learnings and feel free to find me @BradMEpstein if you want to go through my timeline where I shared some more real-time leanrings!

Bonus! PowerPoint is where data goes to die!

If you work with data (you should!) treat it as a living, breathing source. PowerPoint it becomes static and if 2015 taught me anything – is that static is kryptonite for the modern marketer. So learn new tools that keep you agile and keep your brand’s marketing velocity as fast as possible.

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Q&A with psLIVE’s Peter Pearce

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Peter PearceFor this month’s Guest Column, we sat down with Peter Pearce, who heads up the Atlanta office for our new sister agency, psLIVE. Hear how he got where he is, where he’s going and why he loves his job.

Tell us about psLIVE – how do you describe the company to strangers?
My elevator pitch usually starts with defining “lifestyle marketing” (sports, entertainment, grassroots, retail) and who our clients are. Then I describe the work we do: Large-scale sponsorship activation, event development, mobile tours, sampling, street teams, staffing. You take it for granted because you live it every day, but the usual reaction is “that sounds like a lot of fun,” and it is!

What differentiates psLIVE from the competition? 
I think it all starts with our values – we live them every day. We are fiercely competitive, and our reputation for “doing it right” has followed us since inception. Secondly, the Dentsu Aegis push to collaborate across agency brands is a huge advantage – shared insights, tools and resources are a great business driver. Finally, we’re not just a creative, client-service and production agency. We are vertically integrated, with assets and services inhouse that many agencies outsource. This allows us to achieve budget efficiencies and get to market quickly.

What three words would you use to describe your staff?
Best. In. Class.

How did you get into this industry?
It’s sobering to realize I’ve been in the business for 18 years! I finished school and worked for the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games after school, then I began in the agency world at what is now CSE (formerly Career Sports Entertainment). After five years, I helped open the Atlanta office of Strategic Sports Group, where I spent another five years building that business. I’ve now been with psLIVE (formerly Vivid and Team Epic) for eight years, and it has been a great ride so far.

Looking back at 2014, do you have a few favorite programs or campaigns your teams managed?
That’s hard because we emotionally invest so much in all our clients, but a few programs stand out. Our work on ESPN’s Heisman House is remarkable because of sheer scale, complexity and inherent logistical challenges. Our USTA work, which showcased the US Open of Tomorrow exhibit, really pushed the design envelope. And our work for AT&T is constantly evolving to keep pace with technology and continue to integrate into the consumer experience.

How has technology changed the way you approach the business? 
The smart phone has dramatically changed the event landscape, and we’ve leveraged technology in creative and compelling ways. We strive to design a pre/during/post-event engagement via mobile and social channels because mobile technology shortens the time between brand engagement and purchase. I see a bright future for two-screen interactive experiences at events, where you use your personal device to play on larger screens, or to create physical action onsite. You’ll also see more photo opportunities designed for selfies, and a decline in green screen/photo booths. Finally, I think beacons, NFC and other pushes to mobile engagements will become more prevalent in 2015.

What publications/website do you find most relevant?
I always try to stay current with AdWeek, MediaPost, BrandWeek, etc. to understand the broader media world. I also read traditional Lifestyle Marketing media like Event Marketer, Sports Business Journal and BizBash. However, I think the single most relevant website I visit frequently is Reddit – it’s truly the “front page of the Internet.” Although it’s not always totally PC, no other website captures the current cultural zeitgeist like Reddit.

What are your favorite apps?
The ones I use routinely are pretty limited, but my essentials are Uber, Spotify, Delta Airlines, Waze (traffic in ATL sucks), Open Table, GolfNow and Instagram.

What excites you about psLIVE’s integration with MKTG INC?
I’m most excited about the combined potential of two agencies coming together. The whole is definitely greater than the sum of its parts, and I’m looking forward to what 2015 holds. We’re so culturally similar: the type of work we do, how we do it, and everyone I’ve met along the way has been great!

What do you do to relax?
With this job, and two active kids under 10 at home, relaxation comes in small doses. I’m a formerly avid golfer, fisherman, skier and sailor, so I try to vacation where I can combine at least a few of these. Also, cocktails.

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#DONJULIOSUMMER: The Airstream Hits the Mainstream

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DJAirstream

“Alright, alright, alright. Come on back to the Airstream after. I make the best margaritas this side of the R-I-O Grande,” said actor Woody Harrelson, mocking Matthew McConaughey at this year’s Emmy Awards. I must have received a dozen messages that night wondering if he was referring to Tequila Don Julio’s Airstream Speakeasy. My response: “I mean maaaaaybe … you never know!” We activated 34 events in 14 different cities and served margaritas and specialty cocktails to over 25,000 people this summer … everyone has been talking about our Don Julio silver bullet lately, so why not Woody, too?!

Airstreams are huge right now — NPR even did a piece on how mobile campers are making a big comeback. Their sleek aluminum design is a fast-growing hot commodity. But that created a challenge for us — how do you create one that stands out? For starters, our Airstream Speakeasy is not just any Airstream: It’s a state-of-the-art cocktail bar on wheels that has all the features of your favorite mixology-centric watering hole. It comes equipped with a “Craft-on-Draft” (cocktails on tap) system, glassware chillers, top-of-the-line refrigeration and even plush leather seating. The Airstream Speakeasy is like sitting on a cloud.

The story behind the Speakeasy’s creation is reminiscent of Don Julio González’ endeavor to change the game in tequila decades ago. It began backstage at Bonnaroo, when bartender Marshall Altier was making drinks on a folding table with packaged mixers. He decided he needed to step up the cocktail experience at festivals by wheeling in his own custom mobile bar.

He called friend and fellow bartender Ben Scorah to explain the concept, without any idea of how to bring the idea to life. Ben introduced Marshall to his childhood friend Mark Wiseberg, a former Aston Martin engineer. Together, the trio created the Airstream Speakeasy — the perfect fit for Don Julio, which supports those who work to follow their passion.

The cross-country tour kicked off on Cinco de Mayo in Brooklyn and wrapped up on Mexican Independence Day (Sept 16) in Austin. Trip highlights included the Food & Wine Classic, a San Francisco Giants game at AT&T Park and the Governor’s Ball in NYC. Some of the most cherished moments were at the intimate Farm to Shaker events, where 30 to 40 local bartenders were invited to local farms to learn about organic farming practices similar to Don Julio’s agave-growing methods. There they had the chance to pick fresh ingredients and create their own bespoke cocktails aboard the Speakeasy.

The summer road trip was so successful that Don Julio will be continuing stops at culturally relevant festivals in the future. So, if you haven’t yet had a chance to see the Airstream Speakeasy, alright, alright, alright, do as Woody says and come on back for a visit.

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Strategy Field Trip! Learnings from Iconosphere

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Last month, our Strategy and Planning team took a trip to Chicago to attend Iconosphere 2014. Consumer insights, research and cultural trends were shared — below are 3 things we learned at #Iconosphere à la Instagram. #tbt #doitforthegram

Iconosphere 1

Iconosphere2

Iconosphere3

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Brands and the Audience Evolution

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Screen Shot 2014-04-30 at 2.42.30 PM

Frank Bruni wrote an interesting piece in the New York Times about what Princeton prof. Daniel Rodgers calls the “Age of Fracture.

The idea is, as our knowledge has gotten more specialized, there is less common ground that draws us together. Everyone is taking in content with their own customized feeds. Even at Princeton, in a room full of geniuses, the average teacher struggles to find common cultural references.

In the mid-70’s, America’s top rated show, All in the Family, drew 23% of all Americans. That means that almost 1 in 4 Americans were reacting to the same thing at the exact same time. Today, America’s top-rated show, NCIS, draws 1/16th of all Americans (7%), including those who DVR it.

Sure, there are a few cultural events (like the Super Bowl) that draw up to 35% of us, but on a regular basis, there is no MASS AUDIENCE anymore. Everything is going niche and finding a very specific following. Some of us are watching HBO and Netflix Original Series, some are watching cable and network series, and some of us simply watch videos through our social feeds.

The same is true of social networks.

Parents and brands joined Facebook, so influencers switched to Instagram. Then they moved to Instagram, so influencers migrated to Snapchat. Fred Wilson, the legendary investor who wisely invested in Twitter, Tumblr, Zynga, Etsy & Kickstarter, recently commented on this on a fascinating profile in Business Insider.

On Instagram, he says:

“A lot of the stuff that was on Instagram has now moved to Snapchat. It doesn’t mean that people are not using Instagram, but if I go back and look at my Instagram feed a year ago versus today, there’s a lot of people who were in my Instagram feed a year ago who aren’t there today. They’ve been replaced by brands.

So now my Instagram feed is full of things like the New York Knicks and restaurants posting amazing photos of food. The young Facebook user base who left Facebook to go to Instagram has now seemingly moved mostly to Snapchat and my generation (baby boomers) plus brands are what’s on Instagram now.”

So…what is the NEXT BIG Social network once all the brands and parents get to Snapchat? Maybe nothing! In an era of niches, there’s no next big network that has attained critical mass. Instead, there are a bunch of small communities forming that cater to specific interests with very devout followings. Here are a few of the communities that are developing:

There are communities for Musicians:  40 million musicians share their music with 200,000 listeners;

Communities for Students: a network of 34.2 MM students and teachers around the world that is dedicated to helping everyone become more educated;

…and even communities for Storytellers: 25 million people around the world writing and reading 40 million stories.

The landscape has changed, but there are still a lot of great ways to reach an audience. In fact, brands may have an easier job targeting their core consumers because these communities have done such a good job of singling out very specific demographics.

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You’re So Vain

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Selfie

You probably think this post is about you, don’t you? Let’s admit it—you’ve taken at least one #selfie. Selfies entered our social vocabulary around the early 2000s, the MySpace (remember Tom?) era, and included awful glares from the bathroom mirror. But thanks to front-facing camera and filters (thanks, Instagram!), selfies have been looking a lot better, with people from around the world posing, pouting and tilting their heads in front of a camera and sharing it online.

Selfies have become a sociological phenomenon — so much so that research projects have sprouted up around the topic. Selfiecity is one such project, analyzing over 120,000 selfies online from New York, Sao Paulo, Berlin, Bangkok and Moscow. The project investigated the style of selfies and other demographic differences.

Selfiecity’s findings reveal that people take less selfies than assumed; only about 3-5% of the images Selfiecity analyzed were considered selfies. Women share more selfies than men; and particularly stronger in Moscow than in any other cities covered by the project. However, selfies from Moscow feature fewer smiling faces than those from Bangkok (what’s up with that?).

With life-logging easier than ever, the selfie phenomenon will not likely fade anytime soon. So, take one today—you won’t be the only one!

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Written by Alayne Luistro
Alayne Luistro

February 27th, 2014 at 3:14 pm

Bonfyre Ignites St. Louis Cardinals “Winter Warm-Up” Fan Fest

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BF4

Our friends at Bonfyre teamed up with the St. Louis Cardinals for their 2014 Cardinals CARE Winter Warm-Up. The three-day fan-centric event provided fun photo opportunities and introduced a new way for fans to connect with Cardinals players, coaches and media.

“We’re thrilled to be working with the St. Louis Cardinals to enhance the fan experience around such an amazing community event like the Winter Warm-Up,” said Mark Sawyier, CEO of Bonfyre. Fans had access to exclusive, behind-the-scenes photos, fun contests and more.

Our St. Louis-based technology partner complemented the Cardinals’ complete social media coverage of the three-day long event on official club platforms like Twitter (@Cardinals), Facebook (Facebook.com/Cardinals) and Instagram (@Cardinals). The experienced-based social platform allowed fans to share content while automatically creating a digital memory of the experience.

Read the original press release here: http://goo.gl/YadYxG

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How Brands Are Taking a Bite Out of Content

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TheQueen

We all know content is king, but these days the platform used to share that content has become just as important as the content itself. Consumers’ content consumption has changed. With busy, hectic lives, today’s consumers seek content that can be easily accessed and quickly grasped. Various platforms such as Instagram, Twitter or Vine have its own point of difference.

SocialMedia

Bite-sized content, often visually based (images or videos), have made it easy for consumers to digest information and cull what’s really relevant.

supply&demand

And in a world full of noise and diminishing attention spans (roughly 2.8 seconds), brands now have to be more creative than ever to grab consumers’ attention—let alone engage with them.

attention

Take Vine, for instance. Lowe’s leveraged Vine’s 6-second and looping feature to share fun, very short, yet informational life-hack videos. Another example is Airbnb leveraged Vine’s 6-second feature to develop a crowd-sourced short film, culled from over 750 submissions, called Hollywood & Vines.

Bite-sized content allows people to consume content on the fly—whenever they want, on whatever device they choose. It provides people with enough information to know about a topic and enough of a teaser so they can seek out more they’re hungry for it. It is a very effective method for building awareness, providing variety and promoting social sharing.

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