Archive for the ‘Marketing’ tag

New Year. New You. New Apps.

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The beginning of the year starts with the best intentions.  Maybe it’s your New Year’s resolutions to get in shape, start eating right or to run every day. Or it’s just a resolution to be better than you were last year. Whatever your resolution may be, as responsibilities pick up at work and at home, i.e. life happens, they become increasingly more difficult to keep.

The good news? There’s an app for everything! Even your New Year’s Resolution and especially self-care. And we have some tried-and-true recommendations to help with any goal you may have to make 2017 your BEST year yet.

Get In Shape

Nike+ Training

The Nike+ Training App has workouts from beginner to advanced levels.  You can set reminders to workout, start your own workout program, and even download workouts so you can complete them without using your data. The Nike+ Training App rarely requires equipment (though it offers modifications if you’d like to use equipment), which makes it a great tool for anyone who spends a lot of time on the road. Just download the app, pack your training shoes and get a sweat in no matter where you are.

Run Every Day

Nike+ Run Club

The Nike+ Run Club App is the all-in-one tool for beginners to advanced runners alike.  The app tracks your miles, your splits and your progress over time. You can also set up a Nike+ Coach plan to help keep you on track to your goals. Plus, there will always be an elite athlete congratulating you for getting out there…and they can be quite motivating!

Get Involved/Take Action

Countable

Countable is your one-stop-shop for everything US politics.  It notifies you of bills under consideration, explains them in a lay-person’s terms, and gives you the opportunity to vote yea or nay (which is then sent directly to your rep). Countable makes it easy to get involved, no matter your party affiliation.

Change Habits

Fabulous

Fabulous is an app made in partnership with the Duke School of Behavioral Economics to help you build healthy habits. It starts small, like “drink water as soon as you wake up for three days in a row.” And progresses to include tips on eating healthy breakfast and to exercise and even offers tips on mental habits and meditation. It can be a bit overwhelming at first, but at the end of the day, having a lot of small habits adds up to feeling happier, healthier, and more energized.

Unplug

BreakFree

BreakFree is the app we all know we need and only sort-of want. The app works to analyze how addicted you truly are to your smartphone and assist you in cutting down phone-usage. You can set new guard rails for yourself, and the app will notify you in real-time if you aren’t meeting those expectations (i.e. if you’ve been on the phone too long without a break). Users say it’s a hugely humbling experience, and helps get you to think twice before picking up that small block. Maybe the Instagram feed can wait a bit.

Try Meditating

Headspace

Meditation can be an intimidating practice, especially if you’re always on the move, both physically and mentally. Headspace is an app to help reduce stress and anxiety through a series of guided meditation, for beginners to gurus. The free version comes with one level of meditation and you can download the app with a free 10-day trial before committing to a subscription for a large collection of guided meditations. OHMMMMMMMMM……

 

 

 

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Written by Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle
Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle

January 30th, 2017 at 11:38 am

MKTG Welcomes French Sports Marketing Agency Keneo to the Family

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PRESS RELEASE: Dentsu Aegis strengthens sports marketing offering in France with acquisition of Keneo

September 21, 2016: Dentsu Aegis Network today announces the acquisition of Keneo, a leading French sports marketing agency. Keneo will be fully integrated into Dentsu Aegis Network’s lifestyle marketing agency MKTG, further strengthening the brand and the network’s sports consulting and marketing offering.

Founded in 2008 and screen-shot-2016-09-21-at-10-25-34-amheadquartered in Paris, Keneo provides a complete service offering from strategic consulting to execution, both in France and internationally. With a strong team of 30 sports marketing experts, the agency serves a large variety of professional clubs and organising committees, including the French Football Federation, Tokyo 2020, Paris 2024, Paris Saint-Germain and the National Rugby League, among others.

Following the acquisition, Edouard Donnelly, Chairman of Keneo, and Franck Ladouce, CEO of Keneo, will continue to lead their successful team, becoming CEO and Deputy CEO of MKTG France respectively. Both will report to Thierry Jadot, CEO of Dentsu Aegis Network France, Benelux and MENA, and work directly with Charlie Horsey, Global Brand President of MKTG, on integration, collaboration and business development.

Thierry Jadot, CEO of Dentsu Aegis Network France, Benelux and MENA, commented: “Keneo complements and strengthens an area of expertise already present in Dentsu Aegis Network’s DNA. This is a fantastic opportunity to project ourselves with even greater strength and speed into the sports marketing and communication sector with an agency that has become a reference in the field. The addition of Edouard and Franck to the Board of MKTG is an important asset for our network, and together we will be able to deliver a wide range of sport and entertainment campaigns and enable greater collaboration within our regions.”

Charlie Horsey, US CEO and Global Brand President MKTG, said: “Providing innovative, insight-driven sports marketing and consulting services to our clients is a huge priority at MKTG and we are thrilled to welcome the Keneo team in France to the MKTG family. Having the ability to leverage and collaborate with our global network of experts and resources will benefit not only everyone at MKTG, but our clients and our partners across the Dentsu Aegis Network as well. We look forward to working with Edouard and Franck and their entire team to achieve great things across France and around the globe.”

Edouard Donnelly, CEO of MKTG France said: “I am delighted to be joining MKTG and Dentsu Aegis Network. It was an obvious step for us to join an impressive network that shares our values and commitment to being at the forefront of sports marketing and we are delighted to join forces”.

Franck Ladouce, Deputy CEO of MKTG France, added: “We are particularly proud to join a group which is renowned for its innovation and creativity. This partnership represents many new opportunities for our people and our clients, combining the expertise of our teams with the strength and know-how of the group’s international network.”

 

–Contributed by Dentsu Aegis Network and MKTG

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Influencers Are People, Too!

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There have been a lot of articles written lately on Influencer Marketing. The sentiment seems to range from frustration (“Why Brands Fail at Influencer Marketing”) to bitterness (“Is It Time To Call Bullshit on Influencer Marketing?”). As we navigate the ever-changing “new normal” of data driven marketing, distribution platforms, emerging technologies, and media channels, we too often lose the humanity in our craft. Nowhere is this more critical than when we look to embrace those with influence and have them embrace us in return.

To start, let me share one of the lenses I look through on the topic. Nine years ago I met a young hip-hop dancer from Indiana named Will Adams, a great kid with a big smile and even bigger talents. He moved to LA, determined to make a career out of hip hop dance and got on the grind. With endless classes and auditions while doing whatever it took to get by, he was the embodiment of the starving artist.

I started a video production company dedicated to the dance world with my friend and videographer Helton “Brazil” Siqueira. Together we created content – and lots of it – for dancers like Will and dozens of others. We did it out of love for the art form and the artists themselves. Fast forward, “Wildabeast” now has amassed more than 1.6 million YouTube subscribers. One of his class videos has an attention-getting 92 million views and his content is highly anticipated and voraciously consumed.

An influencer in every sense of the word, Willdabeast’s peers, students and fans take cues from him on everything from fashion to food to electronics. As you might imagine, brands and agencies have tried to leverage his influence, sometimes clumsily, sometimes offensively. What should be a match made in heaven looks more like an awkward courtship.

Seemingly requisite in blog posts these days are lists, so here are 4 guideposts to consider when wading into the Influencer Marketing waters:

1. Understand What Type of Influencer You’re Dealing With

Beyond a boatload of eyeballs, it’s important to take a look at how and why these folks are influencers. What are they known for? What cues do people look to them for, and through what lens do people view them? The credibility of any influencer will vary from topic to topic based on their actual experience and role in the space. Brands should understand those nuances when approaching any influencer.

Some influencer profiles might include Practitioner, someone who is hands-on in his/her art form, sport, or discipline. An Analyst, similar perhaps to an academic, may be an individual who is viewed as having credibility in analyzing and critiquing the particular discipline, usually based on an investment of study and learning in the space. A Curator, as many of the new YouTube stars are, has built a following as someone who is agnostic, constantly searching out, assessing and sharing the latest trends and techniques.

Think of the differences between how people view influencers within the context of the influencer’s experience and role. In fashion for example, these nuances become apparent when looking at designer Christian Soriano, fashion blogger Sylvia Haghjoo, and Valerie Steele, fashion historian, curator, and director of the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York. All are highly credible in the fashion space, but come from three distinct perspectives.

It is important to understand how the influenced view the influencer. This relationship provides a critical foundational underpinning to an influencer strategy.

2. Understand How They Relate to Your Brand

Similarly, it is critical to understand how the influencer relates to your brand. And this is often a challenge for marketers as we may view our brands through rose-colored glasses, or perhaps more relevant, a sepia tone Instagram filter. Don’t try to force your brand into a role that is inauthentic.

Work hard to take an objective view on this topic. Is the influencer a functional user, where the product is essential to the creation of their art and the development of their discipline? Are they an ancillary user where the product might play a supporting role, or perhaps a lifestyle user where the product has no direct line-of-sight to the discipline but is connected to the influencer’s personal identity and preferences.

Especially for products where competitive parity is the norm, it is often what your brand stands for that makes the difference. And that stance in today’s connected world is shown and proven by actions, not messaging.

In short, don’t try to convince people that Willdabeast uses your candy bar to fuel up for a class. Perhaps instead, simply show the community that you value his art form and are a company that is committing resources to make sure he is able to create more of it. Will’s loyal followers will love you – and your candy bar – for it.

3. Come to Know Them as People, Not Just Eyeballs

When you meet Willdabeast, you will find someone with a huge heart, a big smile and sharp wit who has achieved a level of celebrity few have within the dance world, evidenced by direct outreach to him from music icons like Diddy and Usher. You will hear people on the streets of LA calling out his name in passing cars and sharing their personal stories of how he inspires them, even having “saved their lives” through dance.

What you will likely not gather in a cursory discussion is his personal path, the decade of grinding it out in North Hollywood, 8 – 10 hours a day between dancing, teaching classes, auditions and working on his choreography chops. Nor will you understand his vision for the future. Is there a “Super Bowl” or an “Oscar” in their discipline the influencer is trying to achieve? Or perhaps they, like Willdabeast, have a bigger vision, a life’s mission to expand their art form, build a global culture of inclusion and provide a platform and path for young aspiring artists.

What you also might miss is that sometimes these influencers have been knocking on your door and have been rebuffed. It’s kinda like the not-so-popular kid in school that you ignored and now they have become quite attractive. A delicate dance to be sure.

Invest time in understanding their personal story, what they stand for and what are their ambitions. Come to know their craft. Get out there in the midst of it and understand their community. If you spent half a day at “BuildaBeast2016” and sat in the room where 1,500 amazingly talented dancers practiced their craft with Wildabeast and the industry’s best, you would be stunned at the talent, diversity and spirit of this massive, global subculture, and your brand’s place at the party might come more clearly into focus.

4. Establish a Relationship With Them

When the appropriate investment has been made and time spent with your influencer and his/her community, a relationship can develop. You will begin to understand each other’s needs and goals and you will collaborate enthusiastically, with each looking for ways to add value to the other. You will understand and think of creative ways that can the brand support the influencers’ vision & goals…and it may not be all about money.

You want to build a relationship, not execute a contract.

Another friend and influencer in the dance world (with nearly 2M YouTube subscribers) was approached by one of the largest beverage brands in the world (with about 900k YouTube subscribers). They waved their logo and history in front of him and essentially wanted to rent his eyeballs. CPM calculations were done and a fee was set as the cornerstone of the relationship.

This influencer quickly understood that the brand didn’t know, or probably care much about him as a person or an artist. Also, he’s no dummy. They entered into a contract where every tweet, like, mention and post had a hard line item cost to it. It was strictly business. He lived up to his contractual obligations and gladly took their money. There was no sincerity, no joy and little passion for the brand. It was a transaction. He and his followers knew it was such and they said “good on you for getting a piece of the action”. By the way, he was a hardcore consumer of that brands’ main competitor and when the cameras were off, he carried that competitor brand everywhere he went. Which brand do you think his followers went out and bought?

Bottom line? Be real. Care. Be open to new possibilities and relationships. People are smart and they can smell marketing bullshit a mile away. They tend to operate in closed communities, requiring and invitation and an escort. Invest in a relationship where you come to know your influencers. When you care about these people as, well, people, things start to align and the natural harmony of the relationship can blossom. Remember you are not simply making a media buy; you are engaging a person in an age-old relationship, as vocal brand ambassadors, but with bigger amplifiers.

When you take the time and get it right, the true power of Influencer Marketing is unleashed: joyful, effusive and sincere ambassadorship of your brand that is undeniably authentic.

And by the way, if anyone is interested in engaging with this massive, diverse and global community that lives in the center of pop culture, at the intersection of music, sports and fashion, hit me up. I’ll be happy to escort you in…as long as you promise to behave.

Contributed by Paul Fitzpatrick, MKTG Chicago 

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Written by Andrea D'Alessandro
Andrea D'Alessandro

August 10th, 2016 at 5:33 pm

MKTG New Zealand has a new chief!

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NZ trade M-AD-logo-FA

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Marketing and Advertising News Daily | Arrivals & Departures: MKTG taps Kathy Gieck

 

 

Dentsu Aegis Network has appointed Kathy Gieck as Managing Director of MKTG to lead its lifestyle marketing agency in New Zealand.

Gieck joins MKTG from Mango, where she held the role of general manager for over two years. Her 20-year career spans New Zealand PR & activation agencies Acumen, Spark PR & Activate and Ogilvy, as well as directing her own agencies in both New Zealand and Canada.

MKTG launched in New Zealand in May 2016, with specialist activations agencies, Synergy and ApolloNation, and PR agency Haystac merging to form Dentsu Aegis Network’s newest lifestyle marketing offer.

Speaking of the MD appointment, Dentsu Aegis Network NZ ceo Rob Harvey said: “I am thrilled we have been able to attract someone of Kathy’s calibre to lead MKTG in New Zealand. MKTG is an agency with very authentic and human values at its core and Kathy is the perfect embodiment of those. We have big ambitions for MKTG to redefine the lifestyle marketing space and I have every confidence that Kathy’s drive and experience will lead MKTG to great success.

Read more here

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

June 13th, 2016 at 3:33 pm

Marriott Intl. Thinks Global, Acts Global As New Official NBA Worldwide Partner

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July 30, 2015: Marriott International has destinations worldwide, and now can put them into play for theNBA.

Marriott has signed a deal making it the official hotel partner of the NBA, specifically for several jewel events, beginning with this weekend’s NBA Africa Game and also including the NBA Global Games 2015-16 and NBA Canada Series 2015.

The NBA said that Marriott would be the first company to align with the NBA across international games on five different continents.

Marriott International said it has more than 4,200 properties in 80 countries and territories. The company reported revenues of nearly $14 billion in fiscal year 2014.

“Basketball is one of the most popular sports in the world, and our partnership with the NBA gives us an opportunity to tap into a passionate fan base and communicate the breadth and depth of our portfolio,” Karin Timpone, global marketing officer for Marriott International, said in a statement. “Similar to what we are doing with music and entertainment, our NBA partnership helps us create memorable experiences for our Rewards members and amplify the benefits of the program for both new and loyal guests.”

Bethesda, MD.-based Marriott International plans to support the union with multi-platform activations, including a sweepstakes for Marriott Rewards members in the U.S. offering the opportunity to win a trip and tickets to an upcoming NBA global event.

Marriott Rewards will host a series of private meet-and-greets with NBA legends and players for its Elite members and invite fans to take a virtual trip via an #AroundTheWorld photo and social sharing experience. That will begin with the inaugural NBA Africa Game on Aug. 1 in Johannesburg, South Africa.
Other marketing partners involved with the NBA Africa Game include Nike, Ford, South African Airways and telecom company Econet Global.

Marriott International said it would then offer Marriott Rewards members exclusive access to NBA games and events in  11 other cities across Brazil, Canada, China, Italy, Mexico, Spain and the U.K.

All but two of the games are part of the NBA’s pre-season exhibition schedule. The two games that are part of the 2015-16 regular season are Boston Celtics vs. Sacramento Kings in Mexico City Arena (Dec. 3) and Orlando Magic vs. Toronto Raptors in London’s The O2 (Jan. 14).

According to Emilio Collins, NBA evp-global marketing partnerships, “For our fans around the world, there is no opportunity more exciting than when live NBA games are played in their home countries. Marriott International is a renowned brand with extensive global operations, and is the ideal partner to help broaden the reach of our games and engage more fans.”

Marriott International operates and franchises hotels and licenses vacation ownership resorts under 19 brands, including: Marriott Hotels, The Ritz-Carlton, JW Marriott, Moxy Hotels, Courtyard and Residence Inn.

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NBA Global Event Schedule

Source: NY Sports  Journalism

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EMS 2015 Takeaways

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The Good (But Not Surprising) News

Experiential is bigger than ever and only going to grow in importance. More and more brands are putting experiences at or near the center of their marketing mix. It’s increasingly a driving force, making up much of campaign content. One need look no further than this year’s Grand Ex winner – Bud Light and Mosaic’s Up for Whatever – to appreciate the sheer magnitude of this intensifying shift. Some data for 2015:

– 79% of brands plan to execute more experiential programs

– Budgets are expected to increase by more than 6%

Results. We all know that experiential marketing, done well, works. But there’s rising data to back this up which is partly why so many brands are turning to what we do.

– Over 75% of brands see better than a 2:1 ROI on their investment

– After an event, 74% of participants have a more positive opinion about the company, brand, product or service being promoted

– 87% of respondents say a live event helps them understand products or services better than a TV spot

– Experiential drives consumers to purchase: 98% of people are more inclined to purchase as a result of attending an event

– 71% of participants tell a friend or family member about their experience

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Recurring Themes

In examining the vast array of work showcased and dissected at this year’s summit, there were a few marketer behaviors that generated breakthrough experiences:

– They were bold. A no-fear attitude. The thinking is big risk, big reward. Examples: Heineken and KY Jelly (yes, KY Jelly).

– They pulled at heartstrings. Direct quote: “If they’re crying, you’re doing your job.” Examples: Dove, P&G.

– They created user-triggered experiences. See bullet one – this can be dicey – but not knowing what you’re going to get can be the brilliance of it too. Examples: Visa, Old Navy.

– They used experiences to do what nothing else ever could. This sounds obvious but when you watch the floor drop away at a North Face store in South Korea, you’ll get my meaning. Examples: The North Face, Samsung

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3 Key Learnings from Digital Summit Atlanta 2015

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Digital Summit Atlanta, a gathering of some of the most forward thinkers in digital marketing, took place this week and I was proud to make it my 3rd time in attendance. Each year I have been able to discover new topics and discuss the next trends in digital marketing.

Overall, each year has followed its own theme as digital marketing as a whole evolves so quickly. In 2013, trends in how social media was changing for brands was explored in a lot of sessions. Last year it shifted to a major focus on content marketing and SEO. Now, at #DSUM15, the next stage in UX (User Experience) design seemed to be the key focus.

And with that, here are three key takeaways from the conference as it can relate to what we do in the experiential space…

1. Humanizing UX

Many of the sessions at Digital Summit really focused on UX as we were challenged to think of what was next in the field. For example, how do we run UX more lean and understand better, powered with ‘big data’, how to humanize someone’s digital experience. When we map out the consumer journey – remember that each user is an actual person with problems and needs.

When you look at bring a consumer through a brand experience for experiential this line of thinking makes a lot of sense, right? It is our expertise to bring brands to life in a way that they can interact with consumers as people and not anonymous IP addresses. However many activation designs we see in the field could do a better job from at the ideation stage to keep in mind that once launched, these are people with their own objectives who will walk through our ideas.

So when thinking through your consumer experience idea, map it out. Literally draw out each stage of the activation UX and use this tool to identify where the gaps are or more importantly, where it can be more streamlined.

2. Millennials are mobile-first…and are starting to earn a lot of money

When you hear the word “millennials” – how old of a person pops in your mind? Probably an early-20-something with new student debt maybe? Well consider that millennials are were born starting in 1980 and now are entering their mid-30s. Sure there is probably a healthy amount of debt still lingering – but this generation is now entering over a $Trillion in buying power and loves to spend.

So with all of this data we now have on the ‘Connected Generation’ – what have we learned about marketing to them? It’s a long answer but here are two quick tips from @annieg from StumbleUpon.

First, “6 is the new 60” – as in the 6” phone is more important than the 60” TV. Now that doesn’t mean the generation is consumer less video – in fact it’s more than ever. But reportedly 33% do not watch any broadcast TV.

Second, it seems obvious that millennials are connected to their mobile devices, sure, but how many experiences are being built mobile-first? When we consider social, if you stop to think why they are so effective with the connected generation it’s not just because they are social – but because the most popular experiences are mobile-first. Snapchat, Instagram, Vine…some of the most powerful platforms for the younger Millennials have excelled by being native to the 6” screen. So consider mobile-first experiences to connect and make an engagement that this group wants to use. After all, it is why the younger Millennials are now being known as Social Natives.

3. The Entrepreneur Wants to Solve a Problem

I heard a great line this year and it came during a keynote speaker Chris Brogan, whose content I highly recommend. To summarize:

Stop chasing innovation, which aims to just do something.

Be an entrepreneur, which aims to solve someone’s problem.

While this is absolutely a trap in creating the latest in digital experiences, it is also a trap in experiential marketing. Brands and agencies alike all want to innovate and create and truly great new things are activated in our space every year. But when coming up the ideas for the experience on the front end, don’t just try to chase an innovation for the sake of doing it. Instead, identify an audience’s problem and solve it. That is where the entrepreneurship mindset excels and where experiential marketing can truly make an in-person impact on someone.

If you are ever free in May, I highly recommend Digital Summit. This is only a small snipet of content from the 2-day conference. I still have to go through pages upon pages of notes but in the meantime, enjoy the learnings and feel free to find me @BradMEpstein if you want to go through my timeline where I shared some more real-time leanrings!

Bonus! PowerPoint is where data goes to die!

If you work with data (you should!) treat it as a living, breathing source. PowerPoint it becomes static and if 2015 taught me anything – is that static is kryptonite for the modern marketer. So learn new tools that keep you agile and keep your brand’s marketing velocity as fast as possible.

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DICK’S Sporting Goods Taps MKTG INC as Agency-of-Record

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DICK’S Sporting Goods, the largest U.S.-based sporting goods retailer with more than 600 locations has chosen MKTG INC as its Event, Community and Experiential Agency-of-Record. We are tasked with providing strategy, planning, account management, as well as sponsorship activation of the 2015 DICK’S Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon, line-of-business expansion development and ongoing integration and positioning of community marketing managers.

“We have been working with MKTG for well over a year on several projects and have been so impressed with how, from strategy through to execution, they consistently over-deliver,” said Mark Rooks, DICK’S Sporting Goods Vice President of Sports and Community Marketing. “This is a really exciting time at DICK’S as we roll out several sponsorships and consumer and business-facing programs that MKTG will help us bring to market. We could not be more thrilled with our selection.”

“We are so proud of our great success and influence within the retail, sports, entertainment and community-building space over the years and have truly enjoyed working with DICK’S in helping them think differently about their sponsorship and engagement executions,” said Charlie Horsey, CEO, MKTG INC. “DICK’S Sporting Goods is loved by people of all ages, which makes developing strategies, to engage consumers and the DICK’S community so exciting by leveraging both digital tools and live activations that resonate.”

The account will lead by Kevin Collins, GM of MKTG’s Chicago office and the core team will include members form across the agency’s US footprint.

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Guest Q&A: Stephanie Rudnick

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For this month’s Guest Column, we sat down with Stephanie Rudnick, MKTG INC’s new SVP, Marketing Communications. An almost 20-year industry veteran, Stephanie shares her thoughts and expertise on the world of PR and experiential marketing, MKTG and the best advice she’s ever received.

What will your role be here at MKTG INC?
I’ll be developing and managing all aspects of the company’s communication strategy and practice, including media and industry relations, external communications and brand management.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?
“Carpe diem” –  Live each day as if it were your last. It’s something I’ve lived by since learning about it in elementary school from my favorite English teacher.

How did you get into PR?
When I decided on my major, it was WAY before PR was as widely understood as it is today. I spent a lot of time working with non-profits in high school in Chicago and loved when the media would come to our events and publicize our causes. When I learned that I could study journalism with a PR focus, it just felt right. I went to college at USC in Los Angeles because I wanted to study in a major city where my teachers were working professionals in my field, but also because the location would offer me access to a wide array of internships. I was lucky enough to have internships every semester – from beauty to music to technology to entertainment and celebrity publicity – which helped expose me to how different PR can be depending on the client. Since then, I’ve done pretty much every kind of PR across a ton of verticals, both agency and in-house. Now that I’m older, one of my favorite things is to mentor young people who are interested learning how to navigate the business and continue to help them along throughout their careers.

What publications or websites do you find most relevant to your career?
It’s part of my job to read, read, read and do my best to stay on top of what’s going on in our industry and in general. So, I start my day with a scan of Twitter, which helps me get a handle quickly on the news of the day. Then, first thing at work, I go old-school and get my hands dirty tearing through the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal.  I also read the hard copy of the Sports Business Journal and the SBJ’s three daily e-newsletters, as well as MediaPost, EM, Adweek and AdAge. The list goes on and on.

What are some of your favorite work experiences?
I’m so grateful that my job has afforded me so many amazing experiences. I’ve been able to travel around the globe, working, and experiencing working in other cultures. One of the craziest experiences was in Beijing, when just hours before a press conference I was organizing, a friend tipped me off that if I wanted the media to actually publish/broadcast something, I had to give them a gift and CASH. For real. That was fun to have to explain to finance why the company owed me thousands of CNYs in cash and for T-shirts from the hotel gift shop! I also have to share that one of my all-time favorite nights at work was in 2012 at the NFL Draft when my client, Andrew Luck, was drafted first. It was so crazy and exciting and anxiety-inducing being backstage with Andrew and his family and all of the other draftees and their families, waiting for “the call” from the teams. Not sure that will ever happen again, unless my son decides that’s the route he wants to take…urgh.

Who have been your favorite clients?
That’s a hard one but I would say that working with the totally courageous and amazing NBA center Jason Collins was a highlight of my career.

What are your favorite apps?
Amazon, Uber, Starbucks, SportsCenter, Swarm, American Airlines, Diapers.com, Fitbit, WeatherBug, WhatsApp, FlightTracker, OpenTable, Seamless, Timehop and Tile.

What are three things you can’t travel without?
Earplugs, a flat-iron and my Philips Sonicare toothbrush

When not at the office, where are we most likely to find you? (Not that we’ll be looking, of course.)
At home in Battery Park or running around downtown Manhattan with my husband Duncan, and kids Charlie (2 1/2) and Matilda (5 months). And probably reading.

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What’s in Your Wallet, Deb?

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Have you looked at your business card recently? If not you should. MKTG INC’s cards are known for their unique perspective and purpose (the latter being expressly to embarrass their bearer, natch). This column takes a look at the business cards of our coworkers and hears the stories behind them. Here’s the story behind the business card of Deb Friar, SVP, Business Development in MKTG INC’s Cincinnati office.

You won’t meet many people who love both technology AND being a beachcomber, but Deb is not known as a person who typically takes the traditional route.
From retail management (Target) to brand marketing (Pepsi) to technology marketing services biz dev (Catalina) and from Minnesota (the tundra) to Florida (the beach!) – my path has been anything but traditional.

That trait is especially clear in how she helps her clients see beyond traditional marketing to adopt bolder, community-driven programming.
Clients take the safe route by doing what they’ve done before. It’s the role of biz dev to remove the risk associated with trying something new. It takes patience and perseverance to build trust with prospective clients. I’m fortunate to work with the best and brightest in the world of marketing!

Just don’t ever try to bury her in the sand.
I’m like other biz dev folks – we rise to the challenge!

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