Archive for the ‘mktg’ tag

2017 NHL Centennial Fan Arena

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The NHL Centennial Fan Arena opened over the New Year in Toronto, Canada to celebrate a century of hockey thrills. The Fan Arena features several interactive activities, open to all ages, and will be traveling throughout Canada and the US throughout the duration of 2017 so all fans can get in on the fun.

 The Museum Truck

The 53-foot Museum Truck features interactive digital displays, original video content, historical memorabilia, and several photo moments throughout including a customizable Locker Room photo op. Wayne Gretzky stopped by the Museum Truck in Toronto to experience the interactives and sign the Centennial Anniversary logo.

There’s also a second truck which hosts a giant video screen for team trivia and highlights, as well as a pop-up stage for special appearances. Living legend, Wayne Gretzky, stopped by in Toronto.

The Rink

A pop-up ball hockey rink with programmed clinics and games will be open for youth players.

Stanley Cup

Need we say more? The coveted Stanley Cup, the oldest trophy in professional sports, will be present in each market.

Clear The Ice Zamboni® VR Experience

Fans take a seat in a Mini-Zamboni® complete with cool air on their face and a rumbling seat, to compete to resurface the ice. The goal is to create the perfect sheet in the fastest time. All rides will be timed and featured on a leaderboard.

Recycle the Game

Fans have the opportunity to bring their used hockey gear, including shin pads, helmets, shoulder pads, elbow pads, hockey pants, gloves, skates, sticks, goalie pads and goalie blockers/gloves to be donated to under-served community hockey programs. Not only that, but the first 200 donors will receive a shop.nhl.com discount card!

 

Calendar

Check out the upcoming events, and check back to the NHL website for additional markets in the coming weeks!

Jan 7-8: Arizona (Tempe Marketplace)

Jan 12-14: Dallas

Jan 18-19: San Jose

Jan 21-23: Anaheim

Jan 26-29: Los Angeles (2017 NHL Fan Fair, Tickets Required)

Feb 3-5: St. Louis

Feb 11-12: Nashville

Feb 24-25: Pittsburgh

Also, check out a few photo selects below!

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MKTG4GOOD: MKTG San Francisco | Adopt a Family

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For the past month, the San Francisco office has been working with Adopt a Family as part of our annual winter corporate social responsibility event. Adopt a Family is a non-profit organization that pairs families in need with donors (like us!) and the donors  follow a wishlist and shop for holiday gifts for the families. 

We received two families to support so we split the West Coast team (this included everyone in LA and our gals currently working in NY) up. We arranged as a little friendly competition and the teams signed up for items and shopped. Earlier this week, we gathered all of the gifts in San Fran and spent much of the day gift wrapping and getting everything ready to hand over to these amazing families. Take a look! 

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

December 7th, 2016 at 1:44 pm

Canon Celebrates New Camera with Surprise Gallery Event at The Whitney

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Reposted (and a bit revised) from our partner agency 360i’s blog. We were honored to help them fully produce this powerful experience. 

To launch the highly-anticipated EOS 5D Mark IV, Canon and 360i gave four photographers an impossible challenge: only 24 hours after receiving the camera, they would have to display the images they captured at a full-fledged pop-up exhibit, produced by MKTG, at the white hot Whitney Museum in New York City’s Meatpacking district.

Just hours before the event, neither Canon nor 360i nor MKTG knew what images provided by Roberto Valenzuela, Jendra Jarnagin, Alex Strohl and Sue Bryce would look like. But confident in the camera’s abilities, they welcomed 130 prominent members of the media, influencers and New York’s photography community to watch as they were unveiled for the first time around the gallery. As guests arrived, every frame in the gallery was still empty. Then, while the audience watched, the photos were printed with Canon printers and mounted on the walls of the gallery over the course of the evening.

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With over 8.2 million impressions, the campaign and gallery event was a successful celebration of Canon’s passion for imaging, and confidence in their flagship camera.

 

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DENTSU AEGIS NETWORK TAKES TIME OUT WITH…MARLENA EDWARDS, VP of MKTG HR

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Our partners at Dentsu Aegis Network (DAN) recently launched a series spotlighting leaders throughout our network called Time Out with…, and their first profile features MKTG’s very own Marlena Edwards, VP of HR. DAN North America Comms leaders Belle Lenz and Megan Madaris chat with Marlena, delving into her 11-year career with MKTG, from starting off in an entry-level role to leading her department. It’s a fascinating conversation that you should add to your reading list  and will be a recurring series moving forward, found on Medium.com.


DAN: So let’s set the stage here. Tell us a little bit about where you’re from and how this all started.

ME: I’m from Rochester, NY, upstate. I’ve been in New York City since 2002 and can’t see myself living anywhere else. I live in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn. It’s one of those areas that’s just on the cusp of being gentrified, but you still get all of your services and it’s still pretty cool and edgy. I love it.

DAN: You run HR for MKTG. How did you find your way into it?

ME: That’s an interesting story. It’s really about being prepared for opportunity more than anything else. I didn’t go to school for it. Never imagined a career in HR. From the time I was eight I always thought I was going to be a lawyer. I got a scholarship to law school, but by the time I finished my first year I was questioning what I signed up for. It became really apparent that it just wasn’t that kind of idealized Law & Order kind of lawyer vs. the real life monotony of being in a court room and arguing the same thing every day. So I took some time off law school and I got a job to support myself and after a few years I needed to figure out what I wanted my career to be. I talked to a recruiter and at the time I was working in operations, but my manager had me involved in a lot of employee relations, doing some payroll, etc.

The recruiter asked me if I’d ever thought about HR and as opportunity would have it I was working in more of an operations role at MKTG. I submitted my letter of resignation to take another position more in line with what I was going for with HR in the non-profit sector. An HR employee at MKTG told me that they knew I wanted to be in HR and recognized how hard I worked and my determination and they wanted to give me an opportunity in HR at MKTG.

Literally, just like that they gave me my first opportunity as an entry-level HR person at MKTG, going on 11 years ago. Every year has been an education in HR since, but that’s how it all began.

 


DAN: So that was 11 years ago. Wow. What has that journey been like for you?

ME: So I think the journey for me has been really kind of significant and similar to a lot of our other MKTG employees. What I love is that MKTG really allows you to own your business and work autonomously and if you can step up to the plate and you’re prepared and you can show people that you’re providing a service and a benefit, there’s always opportunity. Whether it was working on small acquisitions; rebranding and thinking about our culture and what we want to change; introducing a new program in terms of employee recognition; doing surveys and listening to employees and understanding why we were having people thinking about leaving and understanding how important learning and development was… as long as I was able to build a case and present that to our leadership team, I was always given the opportunity to rise to the challenge. Year after year after year there was always some business challenge that called for HR support and I was able to provide a service to our leaders. And 11 year’s later, here I am!

DAN: Is it what you expected? What has surprised you?

ME: Absolutely not! People ask me all the time what makes me stay because 11 years in the advertising/marketing space is unheard of. But every day is a new day. We do a lot of experiential work rooted in events and having employees in 40 different states spanning a number of different industries from sports to wine and spirits, you have a lot of factors that can lead to so many precarious situations. So if it’s someone wanting an alligator at an event, I need to know what our liability is as a company for having that happen. That’s an HR issue because I need to understand our insurance policies and what that means. Or if we’re going to open an office in London, what does that mean about hiring people, and visas, etc. So really having the opportunity to spread my wings and learn and identify mentors — like other HR leads across the Dentsu Aegis Network — have allowed me to learn about situations I hadn’t experienced yet.

DAN: How has it been to grow as a leader within the same company? Some people move jobs every couple of years to get promoted or ascend but it’s different to do that in the same company.

ME: It is, it’s very different. It takes a lot of self awareness and hard work because when you are being promoted from within people see you in the role that you came in as and it’s a constant reminder. But if you have a manager or a support system that really believes in your contribution, like I have had, they are championing you 100%. They say, “she has a voice, it’s important and we need to make sure we’re listening to it.” It can be difficult but if you have the right team around you it can work. And if you find a place that you’re comfortable, why not stay there and grow?


DAN: Have you had any career defining moments that stick out to you?

ME: The one thing is definitely submitting my letter of resignation and having someone come to you and say they recognize something in you. That has always pushed me to make sure that I’m always doing my best and it’s not always easy. Sometimes you want to take the easy way out but someones always looking and noticing, so that was the most defining moment for me.

The other moment may be before MKTG was acquired, there was a more senior HR person and I remember being asked if I wanted to be considered for this potential role. I was less senior than I am now of course but I remember being all “yes, sure!” You’re young, you’re ambitious and you want to get it done. Well we had a board at the time and after a week or so the team circled back and explained that one board member thought I needed more experience before they could think about me for that role. I took it really hard and I had to sit down and acknowledge that to someone who didn’t work with me day to day and from the outside looking in I had only been at the company for five or six years, without a huge amount of HR experience, so it made sense.

Once we got through that together they saw me as their person for that role. Showing that you’re there doing your best is always going to work in your favor.

It was a blow of course. It took some time, but there were some challenges that came through the business and I was able to partner with some of our senior leaders and they saw that I could rise to the occasion, stand there in the difficult times and support them. And then once we got through that together they saw me as their person for that role. Again, showing that you’re there doing your best is always going to work in your favor.

Two times that I didn’t think things would work in my favor but some how, some way, they did.

DAN: What would your advice be in that moment when you think you’re nailing it, at the top of your game, and someone says “you are, but you’re not quite where we need you to be”? How do you deal with that?

ME: One of the biggest things I’ve learned is you really do have to be self aware. You have to step outside of yourself and really listen to and hear the feedback that you’re getting. You need to be able to get that feedback and adjust and pivot as necessary.

DAN: And get visibility…

ME: Absolutely. Visibility is really really big. The larger the organization, the harder it is but you have to make that effort to get that visibility and make sure that people understand how you’re contributing.

Location: The Roxy Hotel, Tribeca, NYC


DAN: Do you ever talk to your teams about executive presence? How do you think about that?

ME: I definitely think that it’s important at all levels to think about executive visibility. From an HR perspective, you never know how people are going to react to the information that you give them. You always want to make sure that you’re representing the department you come from and the company in the appropriate light. What’s good about our organization is that whether you’re talking about our COO, or our CEO, they’re very entrepreneurial people who ask all employees what the they think about different ideas. They’re really all about the think tank approach. So if our employees have ideas I always encourage them to take it to the table, but it’s really about how you take it to the table. Are you able to show the benefit to the company? It can’t just be us spending money all the time. What’s the value? Talking to employees about how they position themselves whether they’re entry or junior level, there’s still a contribution to be made. It doesn’t have to be this huge thing.


DAN: On the flip side of that, people say that HR is a people business and I’m sure you encounter individuals who are not at their best dealing with difficult situations. Do you have any tips for how you help people problem solve those sorts of issues?

ME: When you’re talking to managers who are having a difficult time with employees, they usually are just looking at behaviors. Counseling them on the factors that really lead to those behaviors, and that those factors are what you really need to address with the employee is what’s been most helpful in my experience. I find that when you’re talking to people honestly and transparently, they’re more apt to be honest and upfront and come to a consensus with you. We often get involved in “this is what I want, and this is what you need to do,” type of thinking, and that never goes well. The questions should be more like “What’s going on with you? What can I do to help you?” and a lot of times people don’t come from that “What can I do” perspective when they feel like the other person is in the wrong.

Also, just try to be objective and take all the personal out of it. I’m really proud of counseling people out of some really disastrous situations. There have been quite a few over the years and you’d think people would never be able to stand in the same room with one another again, and after sitting down, really laying everything on the table, as long as there’s mutual respect there, I don’t think there’s anything that can’t be overcome. Respect sometimes means, I need to address really difficult things with you and this just might not be the right fit. Even though that’s a tough pill to swallow, people respect it and they understand it.

It’s the age old rule, talk to people and deal with people the way that you’d want to hear and receive that information and it goes a long way.


DAN: What are some of the biggest misconceptions about HR?

ME: Ha. That you always have to be careful about what you say! When I meet people at different agencies or in different walks of life they always say they would never imagine that I would be an HR person. Or we go out to dinner or have cocktails after work and people will be like, “oh we can’t talk about this cause HR is here.” We’re not judging you. We’re not here to judge people, we don’t do that. You should look at HR personnel as a resource. We are here to help you get the work done; to help support the business. We like to have fun doing it and we are a part of the culture and the fabric of the business. Talk to us like you’d talk to anybody else. If you’re crossing a line or getting a little fuzzy, we’ll let you know, but utilize HR. I think a lot of people are a little apprehensive when they hear HR or they always thing it’s negative, and it’s not. I encourage people to seek out their HR partners because we’re working with the leaders of the organization to implement change and cultural initiatives and we can help push that forward.

DAN: What do you think makes a good leader? How do you foster a culture of leadership at MKTG?

ME: I think a good leader is somebody who hears their employees and listens to hear not to respond — that’s one of my favorite sayings. A good leader allows their team to drive their business and hears out their concerns . A leader’s job is to listen to that real concern and figure out how to fix it. It might not be fixed in three days or three months, but they’re going to put a plan in place to make sure that the organization is supporting everyone. No good leader wants to do the work of the people on their team; they want to empower their team to run with it.

Listen to hear not to respond — that’s one of my favorite sayings.

 


DAN: You’ve been with MKTG for 11 years. How do you stay engaged?

ME: I think our industry keeps me engaged. It is ever changing and every two years, it’s a reinvention. We have to make sure we are up-skilling our employees and that we understand what tools they need. What worked two years ago is no longer relevant so it keeps HR and the business busy. There’s so much data and information that we have to stay at the forefront of, that it constantly keeps me engaged. If I was working at a bank maybe I’d say nothing has changed in the last 11 years, but in media and advertising it’s constantly changing so you have to always be at the forefront to understand how to take you business forward.

DAN: Is that stressful?

ME: Haha. Yes, constant change is totally stressful. You have to break it down into bite size pieces and prioritize where you’re going to put your focus. It’s funny we have really focused on learning and development over the last year, and it’s super important to us. We’ve visited the MIT Media Lab, we use General Assembly, offer a Keynote course. It didn’t seem like a big deal if you weren’t a creative to know Keynote but now your client services teams are creating decks and they need to know about how to present. We’ve had to refocus on what’s important. It’s not necessarily about how to put a PowerPoint together, but about how to respond to client needs. We recognize that there needs to be a certain look and feel to everything that we present and that all of our employees need to be able to contribute at that same level. It keeps me motivated to see how engaged our people are with the learning and development opportunities we’re offering. It is stressful though, there’s no way around it. It takes a lot of time, energy and support to identify the people aligned with the company vision who will help you get the work done. That’s what keeps me motivated. I have a great team.

DAN: Is there anything outside of work that helps you destress?

ME: I love to travel. I just tried to take a trip to Bermuda in the middle of a hurricane, which I didn’t make it to… But I love to travel. For me, the perfect vacation is a little bit of beach/rest/relaxation, a bit of culture and a little bit of adventure. So I’ve taken some great trips, would probably say Turkey was so far the best one because there was just so much to do and see. I’ve been to Costa Rica, Morocco, Spain, Paris, London… every year I try to do one big trip and next year is the big 4–0 so I’m planning a big one.

DAN: Do you unplug when you go on these trips?

ME: Sometimes yes and sometimes no. I commit to checking in just twice a day and at most an hour each time I check in. So I give myself very limited times. I think in our world you’re never truly able to turn off. If you plug in and there’s nothing major going on it’s fine to step away again but you kind of have to check in and see what’s going on because things change so rapidly.

DAN: What does a weekend look like for you?

ME: Generally it starts out in Manhattan. I work out, just because I have to! I joined ClassPass and some of my favorite classes are around here [Tribeca]. So the day starts with a workout and I am a firm believer in walking around local cafes and shops, so I’ll just put on my walking shoes and walk. Sometimes from Bed Stuy all the way across the Brooklyn Bridge and around Manhattan. One of my key rules is that I’ll stay at work as long as I need to (whether that be 8 or 9 o’clock at night) but when I go home, I don’t take my computer home with me on weeknights or the weekend. Everything can generally be answered by email on my phone, if needed. That is my firm rule to have some downtime. Monday through Friday, I’ll give you all the hours you need and then on the weekends and after hours I turn it off.


DAN: Have you ever had any resistance to that?

ME: Never. The model at MKTG is that as long as the work is getting done people don’t generally care about the hours or when or how you do the work, as long as you’re being responsive to the business needs.

The clothes that I wear are really my armor. Our industry can be very casual and people always ask why I’m so dressed up, but I think that being a woman you sometimes have to put that armor on so that you get that respect.

DAN: Do you have any good luck charms or rituals that you do/wear before a big meeting or other important occasions?

ME: Not necessarily any good luck charms but I love fashion. The clothes that I wear are really my armor. As you know our industry can be very casual and people always ask why I’m so dressed up, but I think that being a woman you sometimes have to put that armor on so that you get that respect. Coming up in the industry and being promoted from within, fashion has always been a way to project a confident exterior that leads the interior along, and pushes me forward.

DAN: Do you have any advice specific to women coming up in their career?

ME: My first HR opportunity was because someone saw that spark in me and it was because of that person’s mentorship that I am where I am today. One of the things that I’ve learned is to always keep that door open. When I see talent or someone who is trying to take that next step I try to offer advice and pointers because it’s also about perception. People rarely tell you — especially if it’s not positive — how you’re perceived in an organization. Having a good mentor helps you get those pointers to figure out the changes that need to be made so that you can grow in your career. Even just making a connection with one person who you look up to and who can impart wisdom, who can give you real coaching and life advice, will be extremely valuable. It doesn’t have to be time consuming, but it has to be someone who understands where you want to be, your contribution and are willing to give you honest advice. If nobody tells you, you’re never going to learn.

I remember my mentor telling me that I always interpreted things as very black and white, but that in our industry there’s a lot of grey and you have to find out how you’re going to navigate in the grey. She warned me that you’re going to put a lot of people off by always saying no. You can be the best at what you do but if no one wants to work with you, there’s no point in having you here. It’s some of the best advice I’ve ever gotten and I’ve had to learn how to live in the grey. And I still do to this day.


–Contributed by DAN North America Communications team and MKTG 

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Advertising Week New York: Girls Rule

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Kim Kardashian, The Girls Lounge founder Shelley Zalis, Linda Yaccarino from NBC Universal and Andy Cohen, host of Bravo’s “Watch What Happens Live” at the Chelsea Piers Gala


Now that Advertising Week in New York City has wrapped, I felt compelled to pen a short piece about my impressions of the monstrous confab that takes over The Big Apple each year.

For the last 13 years, Matt Scheckner and his team at Stillwell Partners who founded Advertising Week in New York as a B2B event, have evolved it to be THE must attend advertising, marketing and media industry summit. It’s also grown beyond NYC to London and Tokyo and they’re hosting a smaller gathering later this year in Cuba. Yes, Cuba.

Once again, they somehow seamlessly pulled off over 280 seminars and workshops, breakfasts, concerts, comedy shows, breakfasts, dinners across 30 venues in NYC. For those who couldn’t be in two places at one time, they also streamed every single session online. In all honesty, I was unable to head uptown on the Wednesday but streamed the sessions, sometimes two at once, and watched on my laptop and monitor from my desk.

No surprise, as it is technically an “advertising” conference, the hot topics once again of the week were digital and the hyper growth of programmatic and of course content marketing. But, another major underlying theme of the week was WOMEN – not only how brands are marketing to (and sometimes objectifying) women, but also deep discussion on the disparity of women in senior leadership roles in our industry.

One of the most popular satellite events and my absolute favorite outgrowth of the ad/marketing conference circuit is The Girls Lounge. Founded by Shelley Zalis, The Girls Lounge is my “go to” destination from Cannes to AdWeek to CES. Shelley founded The Girls Lounge to create a place for women, and men, to connect, collaborate and empower each other. A place to check in, unplug (or charge your device) and take a break from the grind.

Each Girls Lounge is different per the conference, but every day is programmed with casual panels and keynotes featuring powerhouse women not only from advertising and marketing but entertainment, sports, and even finance. In addition to the panels each evening, they host networking events and parties that often go into the wee hours.

While at Cannes Lions they set up shop in huge penthouse suite at the Martinez overlooking the Croisette, at Adweek they tricked out a double decker bus and parked it right in front of the Times Center, the hub of the conference. The downstairs area of the bus was the primping area with experts there doing hair blow-outs and make-up touch ups – because power women have no bones about looking polished – and upstairs they set up couches and directors chairs for the talks. They also transformed a large suite within the New York Times building where they hosted talks and lunches. Another space, a pop up gallery called #SeeHer displayed empowering images from the past and present in partnership with the ANA’s Alliance for Family Entertainment (AFE). The Gallery’s aim was to end gender bias against women in ads by 2020 by bringing attention to the issue – a formal initiative from the ANA AFE.

The crowing jewel of Girl Lounge’s presence at Adweek was a gala event sponsored by NBCUniversal and held in the main ballroom at Chelsea Piers’ Pier 60 overlooking the Hudson River and Statue of Liberty. NBC reached into its arsenal of powerful talent and Linda Yaccarino, Chairman, Advertising Sales and Client Partnerships, NBCUniversal and Zalis interviewed Broadway and television starlet Kirstin Chenoweth. They were immediately followed by the uber-popular Bravo Network star Andy Cohen, who interviewed the one, and only, Kim Kardashian. The crowd of over 800, mostly women, hung on Kardashian’s every word as she talked about stereotypes and her personal focus to empower women, especially young women, to stand up for themselves and embrace their power and femininity. All in all, it was a hugely powerful night, not only due to the A-list talent on stage but the room of incredible women and the overall message permeating through the crowd.

In closing, Advertising Week in New York was a huge success and the programming was more diverse than ever. But for me, what came through loud and clear was that marketing to women and girls, as well as collectively supporting other women in business, is not a conversation that is going away. Men and women are talking about it openly and with platforms like The Girls Lounge being present at our industry’s main conferences, it’s only going to get louder!

–Contributed by Stephanie Rudnick, SVP Communications, MKTG USA | Global Brand Communications Director MKTG twitter and insta: @stephrudnick

 

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TEAM EPIC’S DAY AT MIT MEDIA LAB

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Dentsu Aegis Network’s partnership with MIT Media Lab provides our network’s talent access and connections to some of the smartest minds in the media and technology world. Our people learn, get inspired and make connections through the Lab. This partnership helps our talent stay on top of what’s next so we can in turn help our clients do the same. Last week Eric Ginsberg and Caity Kauffman, our Digital Strategy colleagues from Team Epic, had the privilege of spending the day touring the Media Lab and applying these learnings to their roles.

So what exactly is the MIT Media Lab?

Actively promoting a unique, antidisciplinary culture, the MIT Media Lab goes beyond known boundaries and disciplines, encouraging the most unconventional mixing and matching of seemingly disparate research areas. It creates disruptive technologies that happen at the edges, pioneering such areas as wearable computing, tangible interfaces, and affective computing. Today, faculty members, research staff, and students at the Lab work in 24 research groups on more than 350 projects that range from digital approaches for treating neurological disorders, to advanced imaging technologies that can “see around a corner,” to the world’s first “smart” powered ankle-foot prosthesis. The Lab is committed to asking the questions not yet asked–questions whose answers could radically improve the way people live, learn, express themselves, work, and play.

Read more about Eric and Caity’s insights below….

Eric Ginsberg, Director, Digital Strategy:

We had an amazing opportunity to tour the MIT Media Lab in Cambridge, MA. Overall, we were blown away by the level of innovation in such a wide variety of fields. One of the most impactful sessions was a meeting with Mike Bove, who heads up the ‘Object-Based Media’ lab. Mike holds an SBEE, an MS in visual studies, and a PhD in media technology, all from MIT.

The overview of this lab is as follows: Can the physical world be as connected, engaging and context-aware as the world of mobile apps? We make systems that explore how sensing, understanding and new interface technologies (particularly holography and other 3D and immersive displays) can change everyday life, the ways in which we communicate with one another, storytelling, play and entertainment.

As we think about the future of lifestyle marketing, the ‘Object-Based Media’ lab is a potential resource to help shape the future of how consumers interact with technology.

Caity Kauffman, Senior Manager, Digital Strategy:

The opportunity to visit MIT was amazing. What struck me most was how each individual lab had its own way of exploring and tinkering. Researchers didn’t always know what the end result was going to be or know how today’s development could impact tomorrow. Regardless of the lab, each person had a similar sentiment: sometimes their research fixes a problem they didn’t know existed.

At one of the labs, a researcher named Penny showed us a project where they were developing fabric that curled and shifted when it hit certain temperatures or precipitation. The entire purpose of this research was to simply experiment with ways to cause fabric to move and flex. Their team spent weeks, hours and months poking and prodding at triangle-shaped swatches of different types of fabric. Somewhere along the way, a major athleticwear company saw this as an opportunity to create a ventilated product that opens up when an athlete gets hot.

As someone who is always strategically thinking with a specific goal in mind, it was a unique opportunity for me to talk to thinkers who approach their work in an open-ended manner, and with the freedom to let their curiosity lead the way.

Thanks Dentsu Aegis Network for the opportunity!

–Contributed by Team Epic & MKTG Global Communications Team

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MKTG Hires Amy Kemp As SVP, Global Hospitality, Sport & Entertainment

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Amy Kemp joins MKTG

Amy Kemp joins MKTG

FROM EVENT MAGAZINE:

Posted on October 5, 2016 by Kim Benjamin

Global lifestyle marketing agency MKTG has recruited Amy Kemp to the role of SVP, global hospitality, sport and entertainment.

In this global role, reporting to Matt Manning, MKTG’s head of international development, Kemp will lead the agency’s rapidly expanding international hospitality business, splitting her time between MKTG’s London and New York offices.

Kemp brings more than 25 years’ experience in sport and entertainment, including more than 10 years running her own UK-based global business hospitality agency, Kempster, and technology provider, VIP Experience. Over the course of her career, she helped pioneer how brands like Castrol, McDonald’s, Capital One, T-Mobile and BP harnessed the world’s biggest sporting events.

Manning said: “Given MKTG’s rapidly-growing global footprint and position within the Dentsu Aegis Network as a leading sports consulting and marketing resource, expanding our existing hospitality offering along with our sister agency Team Epic, was a natural next step in our evolution. There is a tremendous opportunity in the space and combining Amy’s experience with Team Epic’s 25-year track record, as well as our global network, will ensure solid, creative, sustainable growth.”

Kemp added: “I’m thrilled to be part of this incredible global network. Having founded my own businesses, and worked for entrepreneurs for many years prior, I’m excited about creating and innovating within such a strong, multi-faceted organisation. It’s a privilege to join the team, to grow a business sector in which we’re already so active.”

MKTG rebranded from PsLive earlier this year, as a result of its merger with partnership and sponsorship marketing agency Dentsu Aegis Network Sports and Entertainment.

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Written by Andrea D'Alessandro
Andrea D'Alessandro

October 5th, 2016 at 4:01 pm

MKTG Women’s Leadership Group Is A Growing Force

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womensleadership

Born in 2015, MKTG’s Women’s Leadership Group was founded as a way to connect and unite female colleagues as they navigate their way from entry level to executive, focusing on the many facets of a successful woman including career, family, physical health, etc. The group also focuses on raising women’s voices on topics that matter to them and increasing the level of awareness on the issues that affect our overall culture. Our colleagues at Team Epic have been operating East Coast chapters throughout our Westport, Charlotte and Atlanta offices, and as we venture into 2017, the network is continuing to blossom across MKTG’s North American offices.

The Team Epic group follows five key objectives with a foundation of applying these learnings to both personal and professional life:

Listen to the issues and challenges faced by women of the agency

Identify stumbling blocks that inhibit our personal and professional effectiveness

Support each other as leaders of the agency and our industry

Develop self-awareness and trust

Collaborate to bring about positive change for the agency

How did this all come about? It is impressive to think that a few casual conversations over post-work drinks saw the opportunity to unite our female network and turned these thoughts into a powerful reality. As one of the founders, Samantha Bond, Director of Corporate Sponsorship and Entertainment, Westport, said, “We thought it would be great for our female colleagues to have a safe space for mentorship, social and professional growth. We realized that this group could fuel opportunities for empowerment with scheduled events throughout the year and the help of senior leaders to impart their wisdom.” Fellow founder, Kati Kasch, Senior Manager, Sponsorship and Events, Denver, added “The response has been incredible.  High levels of participation, collaborative curriculum and the interest by other offices, prove that we weren’t alone in looking for a group like the one we created.”

Leading Atlanta organizer Erica Calhoun, VP, Client Services agreed, “Not only was this an opportunity for women to come together and discuss very important issues for this segment of our workforce, it also allowed for growth and collegial interaction outside of specific project work.”

While each office schedules their events separately, both groups take on a grassroots collaborative standpoint, and everyone is allowed to develop and propose ideas.

The groups make use of our network’s resources and takes on broad topics, zeroing in on subject matter relevant to professional women. A recent ‘finance’ focused course honed in on general financial guidance and the importance of investing. This summer’s focus was ‘fitness’ and both Atlanta and Westport hosted self-defense courses, particularly since so many of our female colleagues travel alone so often. Westport worked with a certified R.A.D instructor who visited the office teaching a free-of-charge self-defense class covering fundamentals of self-awareness and teaching basic moves. The session was free and participants were then invited to donate to the instructor’s charity of choice, the Special Olympics. Atlanta hosted female police officers from the local Marietta Police Department who discussed aspects of women’s personal safety- from available safety apps, risk reduction to consent and a R.A.D self-defense course.

Sessions take on a mix of serious discussions and fun bonding experiences; both teams are ending the year with a charity volunteering session and some room for happy hour and a Beyoncé dance class!

Although events have centered on the Westport, Charlotte, and Atlanta metro areas, MKTG offices from Chicago to the West Coast have sparked interest in starting their own branches.  Look out for more updates on what this dynamo of a network will be making happen!

Westport Founders: Kati Kasch and Samantha Bond

Atlanta Founders: Erica Calhoun, Christine Ralph, Trayce Griffies

 

–Contributed by Team Epic & MKTG Global Communications team

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A Toast To Summer…With Some Diageo Brand Cocktails!

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Photos courtesy of Diageo.

Photos courtesy of Diageo.

Are you in need of some showstopping cocktails to make your Labor Day BBQ Instagram-worthy? Thanks to Smirnoff and Crown Royal, we’re keeping the pool party going with some inventive tipples born out of this summer’s #DiageoGames from Diageo’s Tales of the Cocktail event. It’s not too late to be patriotic (and a bit retro) with some red, white and blue popsicles infused with Smirnoff vodka. Smirnoff partnered with the Pop Parlour in Orlando to create these tasty treats that will take you back to your childhood, with a kick.

You’ll need some popsicle sticks and plastic cups to start.

Then combine:

Red layer: 1/2 ounce Smirnoff vodka with 1/2 ounce grenadine 

White layer: 1/2 ounce Smirnoff vodka and 1/2 ounce lemon juice, 1/4 ounce lime juice, and 1 tablespoon evaporated cane juice 

Blue layer: 1/2 ounce Smirnoff vodka and 1/2 ounce blue raspberry syrup

Throw in the freezer and enjoy when frozen!

Or, if you’re loving the days getting shorter and craving a cozy hot chocolate, why not make a cold version and spike it with Crown Royal whiskey… and go mile high with the toppings?!

For more cocktail inspiration, head over to Smirnoff and Crown Royal to keep the summer festivities going into September!

 

Contributed by the MKTG Diageo team

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Written by Andrea D'Alessandro
Andrea D'Alessandro

August 30th, 2016 at 12:10 pm

Levi’s® Opens Its Doors in the Bay Area: Back Where It All Began

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FotorCreated

Photos courtesy of MKTG/Levi’s®.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With its roots planted in the Bay Area, it was only fitting that Levi’s® opened its doors in the East Bay. To kick off Levi’s® August 26 grand opening at its new Bay St. store in Emeryville, Levi’s® turned to MKTG to tap into Oakland’s art scene and create a grand opening evening event that welcomed Emeryville residents, while also inviting key social influencers. With a tailor shop located at the front of the store allowing customers to have their favorite denim pieces tailored by a team of specialized craftsmen, customization was the focus.

Using custom designs built specifically for this opening, local artists Daniel Chimowitz and Nigel Sussman brought their unique flare and artistic ability to a store already filled with excitement. Attendees gave their new denim jackets and jeans to both artists to customize with a unique style of screen printing and stenciling. Old school Bay Area coins and iconic East Bay imagery were just some of the many embellishment options for attendees.

In addition to artist engagements, attendees were treated to two local food trucks, music and drinks. With an Oakland vibe and customization at the center of the experience, the Bay St. store saw over 350 people pass through its doors over the course of the four-hour event.

It’s safe to say that Levi’s® showed up in style!

 

–Contributed by MKTG San Francisco

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Written by Andrea D'Alessandro
Andrea D'Alessandro

August 30th, 2016 at 10:54 am