Archive for the ‘new york’ tag

TopSpin New York 2016

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For the sixth year in a row, MKTG was proud to produce another successful TopSpin Charity Ping Pong event last night at NY’s Metropolitan Pavilion as part of our MKTG4GOOD initiative. TopSpin raises awareness and provides funds for exceptional nonprofits that provide educational opportunities for under-served youth.

Over 1000 revelers enjoyed bites from some of the city’s top restaurants, themed cocktails and took home some insane goods from the ever-popular silent auctions…all the while cheering on celebrities, athletes and industry executives as they as they battled at the tables to take home the coveted TopSpin trophy and bragging rights.

Celebrity guests included US Women’s National Soccer Team star Megan Rapinoe, Buster Skrine, Marcus Williams, Dexter McDougle and Darryl Roberts from the NY Jets, Guillermo Hernangomez, Kyle O’Quinn, John Wallace, John Starks and Larry Johnson, WNBA stars Stefanie Dolson, Sue Bird and Deveraux Peters and Ibtihaj Muhammad, musician Kevin Jonas and the American sabre fencer and member of the United States fencing team best known for being the first Muslim American woman to wear a hijab while competing for the United States in the Olympics.

Take a look below for photos from last night’s event! Or watch our video HERE!

 

 

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Written by Paige McConney
Paige McConney

December 2nd, 2016 at 11:16 am

SportsBusiness Journal Visits MKTG’s NY HQ

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CEO Charlie Horsey and his favorite work by Roy Lichtenstein he picked out for his first office decades ago

 

FROM SPORTSBUSINESS JOURNAL:

Posted on October 24, 2016

Lifestyle/event marketing agency MKTG’s design prowess is evident throughout its sleek offices in lower Manhattan’s Tribeca neighborhood.

On the walls are two pieces from seminal pop artists Roy Lichtenstein and Keith Haring. “Twenty-five years ago, I had my first office and a $500 decorating budget,” said Charlie Horsey, the agency’s CEO. “The Haring is about having fun, and the pointing Lichtenstein is about accountability.’’

Also on the wall is a certificate signed by Mickey Mouse and Scrooge McDuck, certifying that Horsey graduated from Disney University in 1988, with a “Mousters Degree.” Earning that diploma entailed working at Disney World and donning a Disney costume.

Shoutouts to his hometown St. Louis include a St. Louis Cardinals logo inside of the pocket door leading into his office. “Sometimes, I have to hide it,” he said with a laugh.

New executives of parent company Denstu climb Mount Fuji as a rite of passage. Horsey ascended in June with hundreds of co-workers: “Five and half hours up and 2 1/2 hours down, and we wrote postcards at the top, wishing our clients well.”

Across the hall, there’s a full tavern setup, in tribute to client Diageo, along with a coffee bar. Horsey insists his routine is more caffeine- than alcohol-infused, but his ability to draw a perfect Guinness pint is impressive nonetheless.

MKTG Chief Creative Officer Ben Roth handled much of the office design.

PHOTOS BY PATRICK E. MCCARTHY

A variety of natural textures and lighting add to the open, inspiring environment at MKTG’s headquarters.
Global brand communications director Stephanie Rudnick chooses a soda from the soda machine customized by the MKTG NY Creative Department.
Hometown shoutout to Major League Baseball’s St. Louis Cardinals, Charlie’s home team.

MKTG Chief Creative Officer Ben Roth commissioned local artist Andrea von Bujdoss to paint a staff entrance with something powerful and thought-provoking for employees to see as they come and go each day: “What Tomorrow Holds.”

A fierce Mickey Mouse stands watch in the office, a not to Charlie’s time at Disney U

Horsey earned his “Mousters Degree” in 1988.
Disney University participants. That’s Charlie in the striped shirt on Mickey’s left!
A pint is never far away with offerings from long-standing client Diageo at the MKTG bar across the hall from his office.
A subtle, overhead reminder of the firm’s call letters in homage to it’s original NYC HQ in Chelsea Market.
Horsey joined new Dentsu employees on an annual Mount Fuji excursion in Japan with Dentsu President and CEO Tadashi Ishii.
Photo: COURTESY OF DAN
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DENTSU AEGIS NETWORK TAKES TIME OUT WITH…MARLENA EDWARDS, VP of MKTG HR

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Our partners at Dentsu Aegis Network (DAN) recently launched a series spotlighting leaders throughout our network called Time Out with…, and their first profile features MKTG’s very own Marlena Edwards, VP of HR. DAN North America Comms leaders Belle Lenz and Megan Madaris chat with Marlena, delving into her 11-year career with MKTG, from starting off in an entry-level role to leading her department. It’s a fascinating conversation that you should add to your reading list  and will be a recurring series moving forward, found on Medium.com.


DAN: So let’s set the stage here. Tell us a little bit about where you’re from and how this all started.

ME: I’m from Rochester, NY, upstate. I’ve been in New York City since 2002 and can’t see myself living anywhere else. I live in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn. It’s one of those areas that’s just on the cusp of being gentrified, but you still get all of your services and it’s still pretty cool and edgy. I love it.

DAN: You run HR for MKTG. How did you find your way into it?

ME: That’s an interesting story. It’s really about being prepared for opportunity more than anything else. I didn’t go to school for it. Never imagined a career in HR. From the time I was eight I always thought I was going to be a lawyer. I got a scholarship to law school, but by the time I finished my first year I was questioning what I signed up for. It became really apparent that it just wasn’t that kind of idealized Law & Order kind of lawyer vs. the real life monotony of being in a court room and arguing the same thing every day. So I took some time off law school and I got a job to support myself and after a few years I needed to figure out what I wanted my career to be. I talked to a recruiter and at the time I was working in operations, but my manager had me involved in a lot of employee relations, doing some payroll, etc.

The recruiter asked me if I’d ever thought about HR and as opportunity would have it I was working in more of an operations role at MKTG. I submitted my letter of resignation to take another position more in line with what I was going for with HR in the non-profit sector. An HR employee at MKTG told me that they knew I wanted to be in HR and recognized how hard I worked and my determination and they wanted to give me an opportunity in HR at MKTG.

Literally, just like that they gave me my first opportunity as an entry-level HR person at MKTG, going on 11 years ago. Every year has been an education in HR since, but that’s how it all began.

 


DAN: So that was 11 years ago. Wow. What has that journey been like for you?

ME: So I think the journey for me has been really kind of significant and similar to a lot of our other MKTG employees. What I love is that MKTG really allows you to own your business and work autonomously and if you can step up to the plate and you’re prepared and you can show people that you’re providing a service and a benefit, there’s always opportunity. Whether it was working on small acquisitions; rebranding and thinking about our culture and what we want to change; introducing a new program in terms of employee recognition; doing surveys and listening to employees and understanding why we were having people thinking about leaving and understanding how important learning and development was… as long as I was able to build a case and present that to our leadership team, I was always given the opportunity to rise to the challenge. Year after year after year there was always some business challenge that called for HR support and I was able to provide a service to our leaders. And 11 year’s later, here I am!

DAN: Is it what you expected? What has surprised you?

ME: Absolutely not! People ask me all the time what makes me stay because 11 years in the advertising/marketing space is unheard of. But every day is a new day. We do a lot of experiential work rooted in events and having employees in 40 different states spanning a number of different industries from sports to wine and spirits, you have a lot of factors that can lead to so many precarious situations. So if it’s someone wanting an alligator at an event, I need to know what our liability is as a company for having that happen. That’s an HR issue because I need to understand our insurance policies and what that means. Or if we’re going to open an office in London, what does that mean about hiring people, and visas, etc. So really having the opportunity to spread my wings and learn and identify mentors — like other HR leads across the Dentsu Aegis Network — have allowed me to learn about situations I hadn’t experienced yet.

DAN: How has it been to grow as a leader within the same company? Some people move jobs every couple of years to get promoted or ascend but it’s different to do that in the same company.

ME: It is, it’s very different. It takes a lot of self awareness and hard work because when you are being promoted from within people see you in the role that you came in as and it’s a constant reminder. But if you have a manager or a support system that really believes in your contribution, like I have had, they are championing you 100%. They say, “she has a voice, it’s important and we need to make sure we’re listening to it.” It can be difficult but if you have the right team around you it can work. And if you find a place that you’re comfortable, why not stay there and grow?


DAN: Have you had any career defining moments that stick out to you?

ME: The one thing is definitely submitting my letter of resignation and having someone come to you and say they recognize something in you. That has always pushed me to make sure that I’m always doing my best and it’s not always easy. Sometimes you want to take the easy way out but someones always looking and noticing, so that was the most defining moment for me.

The other moment may be before MKTG was acquired, there was a more senior HR person and I remember being asked if I wanted to be considered for this potential role. I was less senior than I am now of course but I remember being all “yes, sure!” You’re young, you’re ambitious and you want to get it done. Well we had a board at the time and after a week or so the team circled back and explained that one board member thought I needed more experience before they could think about me for that role. I took it really hard and I had to sit down and acknowledge that to someone who didn’t work with me day to day and from the outside looking in I had only been at the company for five or six years, without a huge amount of HR experience, so it made sense.

Once we got through that together they saw me as their person for that role. Showing that you’re there doing your best is always going to work in your favor.

It was a blow of course. It took some time, but there were some challenges that came through the business and I was able to partner with some of our senior leaders and they saw that I could rise to the occasion, stand there in the difficult times and support them. And then once we got through that together they saw me as their person for that role. Again, showing that you’re there doing your best is always going to work in your favor.

Two times that I didn’t think things would work in my favor but some how, some way, they did.

DAN: What would your advice be in that moment when you think you’re nailing it, at the top of your game, and someone says “you are, but you’re not quite where we need you to be”? How do you deal with that?

ME: One of the biggest things I’ve learned is you really do have to be self aware. You have to step outside of yourself and really listen to and hear the feedback that you’re getting. You need to be able to get that feedback and adjust and pivot as necessary.

DAN: And get visibility…

ME: Absolutely. Visibility is really really big. The larger the organization, the harder it is but you have to make that effort to get that visibility and make sure that people understand how you’re contributing.

Location: The Roxy Hotel, Tribeca, NYC


DAN: Do you ever talk to your teams about executive presence? How do you think about that?

ME: I definitely think that it’s important at all levels to think about executive visibility. From an HR perspective, you never know how people are going to react to the information that you give them. You always want to make sure that you’re representing the department you come from and the company in the appropriate light. What’s good about our organization is that whether you’re talking about our COO, or our CEO, they’re very entrepreneurial people who ask all employees what the they think about different ideas. They’re really all about the think tank approach. So if our employees have ideas I always encourage them to take it to the table, but it’s really about how you take it to the table. Are you able to show the benefit to the company? It can’t just be us spending money all the time. What’s the value? Talking to employees about how they position themselves whether they’re entry or junior level, there’s still a contribution to be made. It doesn’t have to be this huge thing.


DAN: On the flip side of that, people say that HR is a people business and I’m sure you encounter individuals who are not at their best dealing with difficult situations. Do you have any tips for how you help people problem solve those sorts of issues?

ME: When you’re talking to managers who are having a difficult time with employees, they usually are just looking at behaviors. Counseling them on the factors that really lead to those behaviors, and that those factors are what you really need to address with the employee is what’s been most helpful in my experience. I find that when you’re talking to people honestly and transparently, they’re more apt to be honest and upfront and come to a consensus with you. We often get involved in “this is what I want, and this is what you need to do,” type of thinking, and that never goes well. The questions should be more like “What’s going on with you? What can I do to help you?” and a lot of times people don’t come from that “What can I do” perspective when they feel like the other person is in the wrong.

Also, just try to be objective and take all the personal out of it. I’m really proud of counseling people out of some really disastrous situations. There have been quite a few over the years and you’d think people would never be able to stand in the same room with one another again, and after sitting down, really laying everything on the table, as long as there’s mutual respect there, I don’t think there’s anything that can’t be overcome. Respect sometimes means, I need to address really difficult things with you and this just might not be the right fit. Even though that’s a tough pill to swallow, people respect it and they understand it.

It’s the age old rule, talk to people and deal with people the way that you’d want to hear and receive that information and it goes a long way.


DAN: What are some of the biggest misconceptions about HR?

ME: Ha. That you always have to be careful about what you say! When I meet people at different agencies or in different walks of life they always say they would never imagine that I would be an HR person. Or we go out to dinner or have cocktails after work and people will be like, “oh we can’t talk about this cause HR is here.” We’re not judging you. We’re not here to judge people, we don’t do that. You should look at HR personnel as a resource. We are here to help you get the work done; to help support the business. We like to have fun doing it and we are a part of the culture and the fabric of the business. Talk to us like you’d talk to anybody else. If you’re crossing a line or getting a little fuzzy, we’ll let you know, but utilize HR. I think a lot of people are a little apprehensive when they hear HR or they always thing it’s negative, and it’s not. I encourage people to seek out their HR partners because we’re working with the leaders of the organization to implement change and cultural initiatives and we can help push that forward.

DAN: What do you think makes a good leader? How do you foster a culture of leadership at MKTG?

ME: I think a good leader is somebody who hears their employees and listens to hear not to respond — that’s one of my favorite sayings. A good leader allows their team to drive their business and hears out their concerns . A leader’s job is to listen to that real concern and figure out how to fix it. It might not be fixed in three days or three months, but they’re going to put a plan in place to make sure that the organization is supporting everyone. No good leader wants to do the work of the people on their team; they want to empower their team to run with it.

Listen to hear not to respond — that’s one of my favorite sayings.

 


DAN: You’ve been with MKTG for 11 years. How do you stay engaged?

ME: I think our industry keeps me engaged. It is ever changing and every two years, it’s a reinvention. We have to make sure we are up-skilling our employees and that we understand what tools they need. What worked two years ago is no longer relevant so it keeps HR and the business busy. There’s so much data and information that we have to stay at the forefront of, that it constantly keeps me engaged. If I was working at a bank maybe I’d say nothing has changed in the last 11 years, but in media and advertising it’s constantly changing so you have to always be at the forefront to understand how to take you business forward.

DAN: Is that stressful?

ME: Haha. Yes, constant change is totally stressful. You have to break it down into bite size pieces and prioritize where you’re going to put your focus. It’s funny we have really focused on learning and development over the last year, and it’s super important to us. We’ve visited the MIT Media Lab, we use General Assembly, offer a Keynote course. It didn’t seem like a big deal if you weren’t a creative to know Keynote but now your client services teams are creating decks and they need to know about how to present. We’ve had to refocus on what’s important. It’s not necessarily about how to put a PowerPoint together, but about how to respond to client needs. We recognize that there needs to be a certain look and feel to everything that we present and that all of our employees need to be able to contribute at that same level. It keeps me motivated to see how engaged our people are with the learning and development opportunities we’re offering. It is stressful though, there’s no way around it. It takes a lot of time, energy and support to identify the people aligned with the company vision who will help you get the work done. That’s what keeps me motivated. I have a great team.

DAN: Is there anything outside of work that helps you destress?

ME: I love to travel. I just tried to take a trip to Bermuda in the middle of a hurricane, which I didn’t make it to… But I love to travel. For me, the perfect vacation is a little bit of beach/rest/relaxation, a bit of culture and a little bit of adventure. So I’ve taken some great trips, would probably say Turkey was so far the best one because there was just so much to do and see. I’ve been to Costa Rica, Morocco, Spain, Paris, London… every year I try to do one big trip and next year is the big 4–0 so I’m planning a big one.

DAN: Do you unplug when you go on these trips?

ME: Sometimes yes and sometimes no. I commit to checking in just twice a day and at most an hour each time I check in. So I give myself very limited times. I think in our world you’re never truly able to turn off. If you plug in and there’s nothing major going on it’s fine to step away again but you kind of have to check in and see what’s going on because things change so rapidly.

DAN: What does a weekend look like for you?

ME: Generally it starts out in Manhattan. I work out, just because I have to! I joined ClassPass and some of my favorite classes are around here [Tribeca]. So the day starts with a workout and I am a firm believer in walking around local cafes and shops, so I’ll just put on my walking shoes and walk. Sometimes from Bed Stuy all the way across the Brooklyn Bridge and around Manhattan. One of my key rules is that I’ll stay at work as long as I need to (whether that be 8 or 9 o’clock at night) but when I go home, I don’t take my computer home with me on weeknights or the weekend. Everything can generally be answered by email on my phone, if needed. That is my firm rule to have some downtime. Monday through Friday, I’ll give you all the hours you need and then on the weekends and after hours I turn it off.


DAN: Have you ever had any resistance to that?

ME: Never. The model at MKTG is that as long as the work is getting done people don’t generally care about the hours or when or how you do the work, as long as you’re being responsive to the business needs.

The clothes that I wear are really my armor. Our industry can be very casual and people always ask why I’m so dressed up, but I think that being a woman you sometimes have to put that armor on so that you get that respect.

DAN: Do you have any good luck charms or rituals that you do/wear before a big meeting or other important occasions?

ME: Not necessarily any good luck charms but I love fashion. The clothes that I wear are really my armor. As you know our industry can be very casual and people always ask why I’m so dressed up, but I think that being a woman you sometimes have to put that armor on so that you get that respect. Coming up in the industry and being promoted from within, fashion has always been a way to project a confident exterior that leads the interior along, and pushes me forward.

DAN: Do you have any advice specific to women coming up in their career?

ME: My first HR opportunity was because someone saw that spark in me and it was because of that person’s mentorship that I am where I am today. One of the things that I’ve learned is to always keep that door open. When I see talent or someone who is trying to take that next step I try to offer advice and pointers because it’s also about perception. People rarely tell you — especially if it’s not positive — how you’re perceived in an organization. Having a good mentor helps you get those pointers to figure out the changes that need to be made so that you can grow in your career. Even just making a connection with one person who you look up to and who can impart wisdom, who can give you real coaching and life advice, will be extremely valuable. It doesn’t have to be time consuming, but it has to be someone who understands where you want to be, your contribution and are willing to give you honest advice. If nobody tells you, you’re never going to learn.

I remember my mentor telling me that I always interpreted things as very black and white, but that in our industry there’s a lot of grey and you have to find out how you’re going to navigate in the grey. She warned me that you’re going to put a lot of people off by always saying no. You can be the best at what you do but if no one wants to work with you, there’s no point in having you here. It’s some of the best advice I’ve ever gotten and I’ve had to learn how to live in the grey. And I still do to this day.


–Contributed by DAN North America Communications team and MKTG 

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Advertising Week New York: Girls Rule

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Kim Kardashian, The Girls Lounge founder Shelley Zalis, Linda Yaccarino from NBC Universal and Andy Cohen, host of Bravo’s “Watch What Happens Live” at the Chelsea Piers Gala


Now that Advertising Week in New York City has wrapped, I felt compelled to pen a short piece about my impressions of the monstrous confab that takes over The Big Apple each year.

For the last 13 years, Matt Scheckner and his team at Stillwell Partners who founded Advertising Week in New York as a B2B event, have evolved it to be THE must attend advertising, marketing and media industry summit. It’s also grown beyond NYC to London and Tokyo and they’re hosting a smaller gathering later this year in Cuba. Yes, Cuba.

Once again, they somehow seamlessly pulled off over 280 seminars and workshops, breakfasts, concerts, comedy shows, breakfasts, dinners across 30 venues in NYC. For those who couldn’t be in two places at one time, they also streamed every single session online. In all honesty, I was unable to head uptown on the Wednesday but streamed the sessions, sometimes two at once, and watched on my laptop and monitor from my desk.

No surprise, as it is technically an “advertising” conference, the hot topics once again of the week were digital and the hyper growth of programmatic and of course content marketing. But, another major underlying theme of the week was WOMEN – not only how brands are marketing to (and sometimes objectifying) women, but also deep discussion on the disparity of women in senior leadership roles in our industry.

One of the most popular satellite events and my absolute favorite outgrowth of the ad/marketing conference circuit is The Girls Lounge. Founded by Shelley Zalis, The Girls Lounge is my “go to” destination from Cannes to AdWeek to CES. Shelley founded The Girls Lounge to create a place for women, and men, to connect, collaborate and empower each other. A place to check in, unplug (or charge your device) and take a break from the grind.

Each Girls Lounge is different per the conference, but every day is programmed with casual panels and keynotes featuring powerhouse women not only from advertising and marketing but entertainment, sports, and even finance. In addition to the panels each evening, they host networking events and parties that often go into the wee hours.

While at Cannes Lions they set up shop in huge penthouse suite at the Martinez overlooking the Croisette, at Adweek they tricked out a double decker bus and parked it right in front of the Times Center, the hub of the conference. The downstairs area of the bus was the primping area with experts there doing hair blow-outs and make-up touch ups – because power women have no bones about looking polished – and upstairs they set up couches and directors chairs for the talks. They also transformed a large suite within the New York Times building where they hosted talks and lunches. Another space, a pop up gallery called #SeeHer displayed empowering images from the past and present in partnership with the ANA’s Alliance for Family Entertainment (AFE). The Gallery’s aim was to end gender bias against women in ads by 2020 by bringing attention to the issue – a formal initiative from the ANA AFE.

The crowing jewel of Girl Lounge’s presence at Adweek was a gala event sponsored by NBCUniversal and held in the main ballroom at Chelsea Piers’ Pier 60 overlooking the Hudson River and Statue of Liberty. NBC reached into its arsenal of powerful talent and Linda Yaccarino, Chairman, Advertising Sales and Client Partnerships, NBCUniversal and Zalis interviewed Broadway and television starlet Kirstin Chenoweth. They were immediately followed by the uber-popular Bravo Network star Andy Cohen, who interviewed the one, and only, Kim Kardashian. The crowd of over 800, mostly women, hung on Kardashian’s every word as she talked about stereotypes and her personal focus to empower women, especially young women, to stand up for themselves and embrace their power and femininity. All in all, it was a hugely powerful night, not only due to the A-list talent on stage but the room of incredible women and the overall message permeating through the crowd.

In closing, Advertising Week in New York was a huge success and the programming was more diverse than ever. But for me, what came through loud and clear was that marketing to women and girls, as well as collectively supporting other women in business, is not a conversation that is going away. Men and women are talking about it openly and with platforms like The Girls Lounge being present at our industry’s main conferences, it’s only going to get louder!

–Contributed by Stephanie Rudnick, SVP Communications, MKTG USA | Global Brand Communications Director MKTG twitter and insta: @stephrudnick

 

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The Summer of a MKTG Intern: Part One

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Daniel Andree (l) and Connor Kubikowski (r) living the 2016 PGA Championship dream at Baltustrol.

Daniel Andree (l) and Connor Kubikowski (r) living the dream at the 2016 PGA Championship

by Andrea D’Alessandro – MKTG Communications

Being an intern is often accompanied by the usual stereotypes: fetching coffee, waking up at 5am to walk the boss’s dog and taking out the trash. Okay, maybe I am describing The Devil Wears Prada, but you get my drift. These stereotypes are nonexistent at MKTG, where our seven summer interns at our NYC HQ have been fully ingratiated into the world of experiential marketing from June through August. Two of our amazing interns, Connor Kubikowski (St. Joseph’s University) and Daniel Andree (University of Notre Dame), have been in the midst of managing new business and marketing projects. From pitch involvement to analyzing our social media channels to planning MKTG and Team Epic’s presence at the 2016 PGA Championship to providing daily news highlights from across the industry – it’s been a busy summer so far. We sat down with the duo to hear a bit more about the first half of their time at MKTG New York.

AD: What about MKTG appealed to you when you were searching for internships? 

CK: MKTG became very appealing to me when I saw how the organization worked and the clients that they work with. They have long-standing relationships with many top-tier brands and are continuously creating new relationships with other brands globally.

DA: MKTG’s sport and entertainment background is what made me interested in interning at the agency, but it was my first set of interviews that sold me. Besides the awesome office, the way Bryan [Duffy, EVP Sales & Marketing] described experiential marketing during our first meeting got me really excited. He discussed that creating experiences is different from other types of marketing in that you are creating memories for the consumer that the clients get to be a part of.

AD: What are some different events you have attended in the past two months?

DA: We attended events for several different clients including: Nike, Diageo and TopSpin. For Nike we participated in one of their weekly Home Runs through Central Park and help set up a COPA America viewing party at Modell’s in Times Square. For Diageo we attended several Happy Hours showcasing different Diageo products. Also, we had our in-house whiskey expert host a tasting with 17 of Diageo’s different whiskey brands like Bulleit, Crown Royal and Johnnie Walker. He taught us about the different types of whiskey, how they are made and the history behind some of the brands.

CK: We also attended an Olive Garden event on the High Line in NYC.

AD: What’s the coolest project you have helped with so far?

CK: One of coolest projects I worked on was a Nike Run Club event, which took place in Central Park. The Run Club organized an event throughout the park and had multiple Nike Pacers that led small groups of runners on different trails. It was an awesome experience to be involved in because it showed the strong Nike brand community. At multiple times throughout the run, our group would pass another group of runners and everyone was yelling, “Go Nike!!!” There was even an Australian man running on his own that saw our group and asked if he could join because he runs with the Run Club back home.

DA: While it’s not necessarily a project, one of the more interesting things I’ve been a part of is performing research on the eSports industry. This industry is something I knew existed but never comprehended how big it really was. I have learned a lot about the games, teams and players. The more I learn the easier it is too see how important it is to gain an understanding of this up-and-coming industry. It has tons of marketing potential, especially in the experiential world.

AD: The internship is down to its last month- do you have any projects you’re looking forward to or goals set for yourselves? 

DA: I am definitely looking forward to working the PGA Championship. MKTG will be hosting a hospitality room at Baltusrol Country Club, the venue of the tournament, and will be hosting clients and partners throughout the week. Since my first week at MKTG I have helped plan the gifts/premiums, room décor, the social media plan and overall logistics for the week. I am very exited to be working on site and see all the work we have put in come to fruition. It doesn’t hurt that I am a big golf fan as well!

CK: The same goes for me- I am really looking forward to the PGA Championship. I have always had an appreciation for golf and to have the chance to work for MKTG at this event is an incredible opportunity.

Stay tuned for Part Two when Dan and Connor wrap up their summer with MKTG. 

provided by MKTG New York

 

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Written by Andrea D'Alessandro
Andrea D'Alessandro

July 27th, 2016 at 10:05 am

Free Days With George National Tour kicks off May 3rd from NYC

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Bestselling author Colin Campbell and one very big dog named George will kick off a nationwide tour beginning Tuesday, May 3rd in New York to coincide with the official launch of the highly-anticipated memoir Free Days with George (Penguin Random House). The book has been named one of the Top 20 Editor’s Pick for Spring Nonfiction by Amazon Free Days with George is the remarkable true story of a 140-pound homeless dog named George and his adopted human Colin, who felt like his life was crumbling around him. George teaches Colin the real meaning of happiness and hope through their connection which transcends a lot of things we know about loyalty and love.

PEDIGREE® is a sponsor of Free Days with George which is supported by a six-week, 24 city tour highlighted by retail book signings, media interviews and visits to select animal rescue shelters. As a sponsor of the tour, PEDIGREE is not only supporting the adoption cause, they are also generously donating dog food to shelters across the country, furthering the goal of donating more than 10 million bowls to dogs in need in 2016.

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On Tuesday, May 3, 2016 Campbell and George will visit the Humane Society of New York located at 306 East 59th Street at 10:00 a.m. to bring awareness and assistance for all of George’s fellow rescue dogs. During the appearance George will visit with other rescue dogs in the shelter while Campbell speaks about their own journey which took George from being abandoned and homeless to becoming one of the most popular surfing dogs in California as told in Free Days with George.

On May 1st, 2016 at 1:00 pm Campbell and George will be hosting an official book signing launch event at Anderson’s Book Shop located at 96 Chatsworth Avenue in Larchmont, New York. Both Campbell and George will autograph books including one very special collectible paw print that only George can leave behind for fans.

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Free Days with George brings to life the PEDIGREE Brand ‘Feed the Good’ campaign, which is based on the simple insight that dogs and people bring out the best in each other,” said Melodie Bolin, PEDIGREE Brand Manager. “We are excited to be part of a tour that demonstrates the bond between dog and owner while also giving back to shelter animals in need. Throughout the tour we’ll donate to several of the shelter stops, helping provide these animals with the nutrition they need while contributing to finding them a loving forever home.”

The tour will continue on to New Jersey, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Pittsburgh, Detroit, Chicago, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Denver, Salt Lake City, Los Angeles, Phoenix, Santa Fe, N.M., Tulsa, Okla., Dallas, Austin, Houston, New Orleans, Jackson, Miss., St. Louis, Nashville, Tenn., Asheville, N.C., Raleigh, N.C. and ending in Atlanta on June 10, 2016,

“George is the dog who changed my life. When I was at my worst, he was there to comfort me. He was homeless when I took him in as a ‘rescue’ but as it turns out, he’s really the one who rescued me,” remarks Campbell. Free Days with George is his story but it’s also the story of any of us who have experienced loss or heartache. It’s a book about love, hope and second chances that we all eventually need at some point in our lives.”

Information for pre-ordering Free Days with George here: http://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/243531/free-days-with-george-by-colin-campbell/

You can visit Colin and George at

Website: www.freedayswithgeorge.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/FreeDaysWithGeorge

Instagram: www.instagram/colintown

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Written by Paige McConney
Paige McConney

April 27th, 2016 at 10:46 am

Don Julio Shakes Things Up at FOOD & WINE Classic in Aspen

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001__MG_2061In honor of founder, Don Julio González, and his passionate pursuit to craft the world’s finest luxury tequila, Tequila Don Julio has introduced a vintage fleet of pickup trucks from the 1942-era that represent his unparalleled spirit and legacy. Each truck comes with a high tech cocktail tap system (installed by the Airstream Speakeasy team) that can serve crafted cocktails at a high volume for large-scale events. This single tower, dual tap nitrogen system features 25 gallons worth of cocktail storage that ensures speed of service at the perfect temperature.

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This “Craft on Draft” system came in handy at several culinary events around the FOOD & WINE Classic in Aspen this year. MKTG INC brought the truck and Denver’s finest mixologists to epicurean celebrations such as Heritage Fire: a gathering of 50+ chefs who practiced wood-fired, whole animal cooking techniques over live-fires, Sunday Fun Day: an industry only day consisting of beef and eggs, white water rafting and a 200 2-pound lobster feed, and the annual Last Man Standing Party: a fete not to miss at the scenic mountain top park overlooking Aspen.

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The trucks will be based in New York, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, San Francisco and Los Angeles. Whether you’re enjoying delicious food at a culinary festival or taking in the sounds at the summer’s hottest music festivals, be sure to keep your eyes peeled since the trucks will serve innovative seasonal drinks to enjoy at any occasion.

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#OwnYourTomorrow

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In support of Charles Schwab’s launch of Schwab Intelligent Portfolios™, we constructed a two-story Schwab Intelligent Portfolios Pop-Up Lounge in two major cities – New York and San Francisco between March 16th and April 1st.

The consumer engagement launched in New York’s iconic Grand Central Station within Vanderbilt Hall and then on to San Francisco’s Justin Herman Plaza. With a focus on commuter locations, this effort merged sophisticated style, technologies and partnerships. In line with the technology-based product, we provided consumers with an interactive robot barista making and delivering coffee, multi-touch IR tables, second story LED screen and an automated ordering system for complimentary coffee provided by Nespresso.

CSOur lounge served as a conduit for Schwab financial professionals to speak with consumers about the product and a place to enjoy coffee with free WiFi. The activation was positioned to live beyond the physical space through social the extensions @SchwabBlue and #Ownyourtomorrow.

The overall results were very strong as it relates to eyes on the product, lounge visitors and meaningful one-on-one engagement.

Brook Soss contributed to this article.

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SXSW: It’s All About That Bass, ‘Bout That Bass (and Mobile, of course)

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This year was my first time attending SXSW. While I had heard all of the stories about how huge and overwhelming it was getting, I have to admit that thanks to some stealth planning and relying on some key mobile apps, I came back to NCAA with a ton of knowledge under my belt…as well as a deep knowledge of what makes a great taco!

After hours of panels and networking and lots of talk of mobile marketing, integrated apps, and keeping it “all about the charge,” this year at SXSW proved that 2015 is once again a hot year for mobile marketing and digital integration into campaigns.

My take on mobile…agree or not, you must adapt. Now.
We know that mobile has become a hugely effective way to reach and engage consumers, whose average attention span registers at an all-time low of just seven seconds. A slight aside, but interesting nonetheless, did you know that up to 25% of consumers, especially the younger set, currently only access the Internet via their mobile devices?

OK, back to business.

Brands have turned the corner and are regularly optimizing their content to adapt to mobile viewing, and restructuring messaging to be concise, to-the-point. They know that once they enter the playing field of mobile marketing, they are seamlessly integrating into consumer’s everyday lives. Utilizing localized marketing, and leveraging data to provide content that is personalized and relevant in real time will make for a better mobile experience.

My favorite App of SX: SXSW GO
One of the most useful apps I downloaded and used was the “SXSW Go” app which displaced printed guides and helped conference goers organize their schedules, and navigate the ever-expanding footprint of events. Additional functions of the app included push notifications about big sessions and events, and a networking tool called SXSocial.

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Mophie partnered with the St. Bernard Rescue Foundation and with a team of St. Bernards, set out across SXSW to “save” attendees from dying batteries.

Super smart SX activation: MOPHIE
One of the biggest pain points for SXSWers was battery drain, and this came up time and time again. Smart marketer Mophie marketed into this opportunity with the “Mophie Rescue Lodge.”  Consumers were encouraged to screenshot their low battery life and tweet it to the brand for the potential to have a Mophie rep, along with a beautiful St. Bernard, come to your location and charge your phone for free. People loved it.

In conclusion: In our business at MKTG INC, we have done really well in understanding how to extend our physical events prior to and beyond the actual event by integrating mobile and social into our activations. Clearly, we are on the right track and it’s only getting easier for us to do this at the great benefit of our clients.  I’m excited to be back at the office and sharing my learnings with my co-workers, but I must admit, the tacos in Austin are worlds better than what I can find here in NYC!

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NBA All-Star Weekend a Slam Dunk

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NBA House

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The spectacle of NBA All-Star, one of the most electrifying sporting events in the world, came to New York City in February 2015. MKTG INC worked with the NBA to develop and produce a concept that would bring all NBA Fans together in celebration of basketball and its unique connection to NYC.

Welcome to the NBA House, 2015 All-Star edition. 70,000 sq ft of basketball activities, sponsor activations, and legendary NBA player appearances. Player appearances included Anthony Davis, Carmelo Anthony, Kevin Durant, Robert Parrish, and the one and only Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.

This was an extraordinary first-class entertainment experience with the NBA’s brightest stars and their fans at the center of it all.

Over 21,000 fans stopped by NBA House during its 7-day tenure in Manhattan and left with a memory that will last a lifetime.

Written by: Michael Del Monaco

Gatorade “Be Like Mike”

On Friday, Feb. 13 during NBA All-Star week in New York, Gatorade allowed fans to step into the shoes of Michael Jordan by taking part in a series of athletic challenges to celebrate the return of “Be Like Mike,” one of sport’s most iconic commercials­. Students from area high schools, media members and even Nick Cannon recreated iconic moments that defined Jordan’s career—they shot, dunked, won and even dressed like Mike! The event was captured in an online video right before the All-Star game launched a social media campaign encouraging fans to show how they #BeLikeMike.

Guest speakers were NBA legends Horace Grant and Dominique Wilkins. They shared their experiences playing with and against Jordan in such epic moments as the 1988 Slam Dunk Contest and “The Shot on Ehlo” during the Bulls 1989 Eastern Conference Finals victory over the Cleveland Cavaliers. The event was another celebratory milestone for Gatorade during its 50th anniversary year.

Written by: Mary Kate Pleggenkuhle

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