Archive for the ‘Olympics’ tag

Navigating Olympic Advertising- Rule 40

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The Olympics have been setting social media into a frenzied spin, yet your brands probably won’t be able to talk about it! Here at MKTG we have great experience in rights holder restrictions and helping brands navigate them to gain traction with creative ideas. We’ve been inundated by brands and network agencies asking us what can and can’t be done with advertising around the Olympics.

The phrase ‘Rule 40′ sends shudders down most marketers’ spines but what does it actually mean and how can you navigate your brands around these murky, hazardous waters?

In theory, Rule 40 stops the over-commercialisation of the Olympics but practically, it simply gives the IOC a way to prevent non-sponsors, athletes and your local bakery from hijacking the Olympics’ valuable brand terms and logos.

Generally speaking Rule 40 has actually been relaxed – contrary to many scare mongering reports. As of this year, the IOC now allow generic non-Olympic sponsor advertising during the period of the Games, provided it had been approved before March 2016 and is clearly part of a longer term marketing campaign (i.e. not just for the two weeks of the Games).

But what does that mean if your brand didn’t apply for these sanctions?  If you’re not an official sponsor like P&G, Coca-Cola or Visa, even posting about the Olympics on social media during the official blackout period — which started last Wednesday and ends on 24th August — can be like doing the 100-yard dash down Oxford Street trying to catch the rarest of Pokemon (if you didn’t get that analogy; it’s a minefield!).

Even, words such as ‘2016’, ‘effort’ and ‘Olympian’ cannot be used by non-approved sponsors in any sort of advertising.

Here’s a guide to the restrictions against business activity during the games:

    You can’t use hashtags that include Olympics trademarks such as #TeamGB or #Rio2016.
    You cannot use any official Olympics logos.
    You cannot post any photos taken at the Olympics.
    You can’t feature Olympic athletes in your social posts.
    You can’t even wish them luck.
    Don’t post any Olympics results.
    You can’t share anything from official Olympics social media accounts. Even retweets are prohibited.
    You cannot create your own version of Olympic symbols, “whether made from your own logo, triangles, hexagons, soda bottle tops, onion rings, car tires, drink coasters, basketballs, etc.”
    Do not host an Olympic- or Paralympic-themed contest or team-building event for employees.

These are just the top line restrictions, there are further phrases and terminology that brands are restricted from using.

In summary, the IOC are trying to protect the investment of their partners and prevent competitor brands from jumping on the positive sentiment of the Olympics.

What are the penalties?  Well, if you break these rules, you will first likely be sent a cease and desist letter, demanding that you remove the content.  The next step would be for the local Olympic Committee taking legal action against your business.  As such, the policing of this will be dependent on the strength and commitment of the local Olympic Committee – here in GB and also in USA, they are pretty hot on it, as you’d expect.

But non-sponsor brands can still participate in the Olympics conversation by creatively latching onto specific moments during the games, as Oreo did with its on-the-fly “you can still dunk in the dark” tweet during the Super Bowl blackout. This means establishing a war-room type strategy, when something uplifting or nerve-wracking happens. Other brands are using individual influencers (such as former Olympians) to help get their messages out during the Games. So, with the right message and the right brand, there will be opportunities to talk about it.  Remember to also run any campaign ideas for the Olympics past your local Legal team.

Ultimately, we have to think a little bit differently – don’t think of it as, “How are we going to get around the rule?'” but more, “How are we going to work within the rule, and what’s our tone of voice?”

 

–Contributed by Charlie Powell, MKTG UK 

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Written by Andrea D'Alessandro
Andrea D'Alessandro

August 9th, 2016 at 3:34 pm

Dentsu Acquires Olympic Broadcast Rights

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mediapost

 

Dentsu has acquired the Olympic media rights to the 2018, 2020, 2022 and 2024 Olympic Games for 22 Asian countries, the Tokyo-based ad-marketing holding company confirmed this week. The rights acquired cover all media platforms including TV, radio and the Internet.

The countries include Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, Afghanistan, Indonesia, Iran, Thailand and others. Earlier, the company acquired similar rights for the same countries to the upcoming Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro.

Typically after acquiring rights, Dentsu resells them to local broadcasters with packages that also include advertising sponsors.

In addition to the Olympics, Dentsu has made other recent forays into the sports arena. In May it agreed to acquire a one-third stake in Laguna Hills, CA-based sports agency Athletes First for $16.5 million.

It also controls both MKTG and Team Epic (via Dentsu Aegis Network), which specialize in sports sponsorships and event marketing for clients including Nike, IBM and FedEx.

Earlier this year, Dentsu was selected as the agency of record for the Tokyo Summer Olympics (2020) and Paralympic Games.

The 2018 Winter Games are set for PyeongChang, Republic of Korea. Sites for the 2022 Winter Games and 2024 Summer Olympics are yet to be determined. Earlier this week the city of Boston withdrew its bid for the 2024 games after organizers determined that a majority of residents were not willing to support the effort.

by Steve McClellan @mp_mcclellan, July 39, 3:47 PM

 

 

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

July 31st, 2015 at 10:57 am

#Rule40: How Olympic Sponsorship Rules Failed, And What It Means For Marketing

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3000938-poster-942-how-olympic-sponsorship-rules-failed-and-what-it-means-marketingPhoto Credit: Flickr user Charles McCain

The Olympics are over, but the aftermath of Rule #40 rolls on. Check out Charlie Horsey’s take on the subject in his latest piece for Fast Company here.

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Happy New Year!

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NFL-nfl-4311909-1280-800Photo Credit: FanPop.com

The Olympics are great.  Every four years I get to become an expert in sports that are so far outside the mainstream I’m not sure they actually exist (looking at you, Trampoline).  Every moment of the Games, from the diver that fails to rip the entry on his inward reverse double pike somersault to the dressage rider that picks the perfect musical selection, I get the satisfaction of feeling like I am entering uncharted sports waters.  And that I know exactly what I am talking about.

But in a few days all of that will be over, and we will once again turn our attention on the great American wheelhouse of sports gluttony: football season.  What was once a weekend of relaxed Saturday and Sunday viewing has morphed into an uncontrollable beast of obsessive fantasy updates, game broadcasts every night of the week (yes, Montana vs. Idaho on Tuesday counts) and blatantly irrational screaming at television sets.

With all that action, here are 3 can’t miss opportunities this season:

1) NFL ’12 App: if you’re an out of town transplant like me there is nothing worse than being forced to watch the games Fox and CBS want you to watch every Sunday.  Enter the NFL ’12 app, a handy little program that will get you everything you could possibly need, from the radio broadcast of your choice to live Fantasy Football integration.

2) Nike.com/NFL: Don’t take this the wrong way, but it’s time to throw out the crew neck sweatshirt with the chili stain down the front.  Now that Nike has taken over as the official supplier of NFL uniforms and sideline gear, there’s no excuse for showing up to the bar/stadium/friend’s apartment in old threads.  With NFL themed jerseys, tees, polos, custom kicks, hats and more, there’s something for everyone.  Even you, Uncle Joe.

3) Friday Night Lights isn’t just a book, movie or (ugh) tv show-go watch your local high school team.  It’s the purest form of football there is and beats the heck out of another night wasted in that dingy bar you always go to.  Plus, you might be surprised by the local talent; check out rivals.com for the latest list of the top recruits in your area.  Who knows, it might be the scoop that wins your 2019 Fantasy league.

So there you have it.  Once the good ole USA is finished winning the Olympics put away your synchronized swimming scoring rubric and break out the face paint.  Football is back.

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Written by John Seiler
John Seiler

August 13th, 2012 at 3:07 pm

MKTG INC Serves Jose Cuervo Pro Beach Volleyball Series

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Jose Cuervo Pro Beach VolleyballPhoto Credit: Manny Pascual and Joshua Ragland

With the 2012 Sumer Olympics taking place there’s no better time to be right in-the-mix of some intense Beach Volleyball action (as if there was ever a BAD time for beautiful weather, shredded demigod built athletes and edge of your seat competition).

The Jose Cuervo Pro Beach Volleyball Series brought to you by MKTG INC is in the midst of hitting some of the country’s biggest beach volleyball towns bringing them an experience that reaches far beyond the average beach volleyball fan’s expectations.  Jose Cuervo has played a huge part in beach volleyball dating back to the 1970’s and they are now injecting a boost of energy into the sport with their events.  Not only do fans get a chance to watch some of the world’s best volleyball players get their bump, set and spike on but they get to do it in true Cuervo fashion. A fully loaded Cuervo Village is open to the crowd offering them some not so typical volleyball activities; Mechanical Lime Bull, 30 foot Rock Wall, Cuervo Shaved Ice Margaritas and a whole slew of activities that you’ll just need to check out for yourself.

The Cuervo Series only has 3 more stops this season so check out www.jcpbvs.com to find out where they are headed next or to watch the action on their live webcast.

Written by: Javier Cubria

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