Archive for the ‘Rio’ tag

Navigating Olympic Advertising- Rule 40

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The Olympics have been setting social media into a frenzied spin, yet your brands probably won’t be able to talk about it! Here at MKTG we have great experience in rights holder restrictions and helping brands navigate them to gain traction with creative ideas. We’ve been inundated by brands and network agencies asking us what can and can’t be done with advertising around the Olympics.

The phrase ‘Rule 40′ sends shudders down most marketers’ spines but what does it actually mean and how can you navigate your brands around these murky, hazardous waters?

In theory, Rule 40 stops the over-commercialisation of the Olympics but practically, it simply gives the IOC a way to prevent non-sponsors, athletes and your local bakery from hijacking the Olympics’ valuable brand terms and logos.

Generally speaking Rule 40 has actually been relaxed – contrary to many scare mongering reports. As of this year, the IOC now allow generic non-Olympic sponsor advertising during the period of the Games, provided it had been approved before March 2016 and is clearly part of a longer term marketing campaign (i.e. not just for the two weeks of the Games).

But what does that mean if your brand didn’t apply for these sanctions?  If you’re not an official sponsor like P&G, Coca-Cola or Visa, even posting about the Olympics on social media during the official blackout period — which started last Wednesday and ends on 24th August — can be like doing the 100-yard dash down Oxford Street trying to catch the rarest of Pokemon (if you didn’t get that analogy; it’s a minefield!).

Even, words such as ‘2016’, ‘effort’ and ‘Olympian’ cannot be used by non-approved sponsors in any sort of advertising.

Here’s a guide to the restrictions against business activity during the games:

    You can’t use hashtags that include Olympics trademarks such as #TeamGB or #Rio2016.
    You cannot use any official Olympics logos.
    You cannot post any photos taken at the Olympics.
    You can’t feature Olympic athletes in your social posts.
    You can’t even wish them luck.
    Don’t post any Olympics results.
    You can’t share anything from official Olympics social media accounts. Even retweets are prohibited.
    You cannot create your own version of Olympic symbols, “whether made from your own logo, triangles, hexagons, soda bottle tops, onion rings, car tires, drink coasters, basketballs, etc.”
    Do not host an Olympic- or Paralympic-themed contest or team-building event for employees.

These are just the top line restrictions, there are further phrases and terminology that brands are restricted from using.

In summary, the IOC are trying to protect the investment of their partners and prevent competitor brands from jumping on the positive sentiment of the Olympics.

What are the penalties?  Well, if you break these rules, you will first likely be sent a cease and desist letter, demanding that you remove the content.  The next step would be for the local Olympic Committee taking legal action against your business.  As such, the policing of this will be dependent on the strength and commitment of the local Olympic Committee – here in GB and also in USA, they are pretty hot on it, as you’d expect.

But non-sponsor brands can still participate in the Olympics conversation by creatively latching onto specific moments during the games, as Oreo did with its on-the-fly “you can still dunk in the dark” tweet during the Super Bowl blackout. This means establishing a war-room type strategy, when something uplifting or nerve-wracking happens. Other brands are using individual influencers (such as former Olympians) to help get their messages out during the Games. So, with the right message and the right brand, there will be opportunities to talk about it.  Remember to also run any campaign ideas for the Olympics past your local Legal team.

Ultimately, we have to think a little bit differently – don’t think of it as, “How are we going to get around the rule?'” but more, “How are we going to work within the rule, and what’s our tone of voice?”

 

–Contributed by Charlie Powell, MKTG UK 

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Written by Andrea D'Alessandro
Andrea D'Alessandro

August 9th, 2016 at 3:34 pm

Cincy goes loco for fútbol

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The Cincinnati MKTG INC office invited an especially lucky group of clients to catch the Colombia-Japan World Cup matchup at the downtown office on June 24.

“As Colombians we grow up living soccer and loving soccer. It’s part of our family, part of our childhood, so to see Colombia do so well in this World Cup and qualify in the first two games brings a lot of pride,” said Colombian native Luis Restrepo, Orgullosa Brand Manager at P&G. “It also means that there is an amazing party somewhere in Colombia.”

With help from her compadres y comadres, Orgullosa Account Supervisor Natalia Salces organized the Cincinnati event, which featured a photo booth, foosball table, Caipirinha drinks, arepas, and, of course, televised viewing of the game (because we couldn’t afford to send everyone to Rio).

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The fiesta drew inspiration from the #MyHouseIsMyStadium campaign for Orgullosa, P&G’s online word-of-mouth community for Latinas living in the U.S. Except in this case the office was our stadium.

Approximately one-half of all attendees were rooting for “those guys in the yellow jerseys” to win. The other half showed up for the refreshments.

Colombia bested Japan 4-1 and advanced to the round of 16. Restrepo used that good luck to propel him in his own foosball victory over Todd Laabs, SVP Marketing & Operations for MKTG INC. Laabs mumbled something about “a couple of sloppy goals” and vowed redemption in the form of ping pong.

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