Archive for the ‘Snapchat’ tag

Snapchat Campus Takeover

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Snapchat’s Discovery feature is providing brands a unique space to garner awareness and engage consumers in branded content. Snapchat has been gaining the popularity of millennials since its original launch in 2011, but one of its most recent additions, Discover, is an extension of Snap’s Stories feature. By utilizing this feature, brands can string together multiple videos, text and images in order to advertise and covey messaging. The feature has attracted major brands and publishers such as MTV, The New York Times and the NFL. True to Snapchat’s fashion, these Discover pages have a limited window of engagement before they disappear which creates a sense of urgency for consumers to explore content.

SNAPCHAT LAUNCHES AMERICAN INITIATIVE TO PARTNER AND FEATURE COLLEGE NEWSPAPERS

Recently, Snapchat has opened its Discover feature to less established media companies: College newspapers. This American initiative is titled “Campus Publisher Stories” which started simultaneously with the “back-to-school” season featuring The Daily Californian at U.C. Berkeley, The Battalion at Texas A&M University, The Daily Orange at Syracuse University and The Badger Herald at the University of Wisconsin in Madison as beginning partners. The stories will only be visible every Friday to Sunday within the campus and student living perimeters. MKTG breaks down three key takeaways for sponsors on this new product roll-out from Snapchat.

THROUGH CAMPUS PUBLISHER STORIES, PROSPECTIVE SPONSORS WILL HAVE DIRECT ACCESS WITH HARD-TO-REACH MILLENNIALS

The Campus Publisher Stories allow room for sponsored ad space. Brands that have a hard time breaking through advertising clutter and reaching the college millennial demographic now have a new hyper-localized platform to do so.

Read the rest of the article here

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Written by Paige McConney
Paige McConney

October 2nd, 2017 at 11:18 am

PGA Championship 2016: Recap

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Jordan Spieth signing autographs for fans on the last day of practice rounds which also happened to be his 23rd Birthday.

Jordan Spieth signing autographs for fans on the last day of practice rounds, which also happened to be his 23rd Birthday.

From July 25-31, MKTG hosted dozens of our clients and partners at the 2016 PGA Championship in our private VIP hospitality suite within the historic Club House at Baltusrol. Despite the hot and humid forecast, we all had a blast traversing the course catching some world-class golf.

We also all witnessed history as Jimmy Walker took home his first major title finishing -14 and holding on to the lead the entire time. Walker became the first wire-to-wire winner of the PGA Championship since Phil Mickelson, who won at Baltusrol in 2005. In fact, all four majors this year were won by first-timers including Masters champion Danny Willett; Dustin Johnson, who won the United States Open; and Henrik Stenson, the British Open champ. Walker had missed the cut in his last two majors, never finished higher than tied for seventh at any major and was perhaps best known on the PGA Tour for his unusual hobby: astrophotography, according to the New York Times.

In addition to witnessing Walker’s triumph, we saw reigning PGA Champion Jason Day, the world’s top ranked golfer, make the final holes crazy intense on Sunday , and even got up close and personal with stars like Jordan Spieth, Rory McIlroy, Dustin Johnson, John Daly, among others. Check out our snaps below and on Instagram and Snapchat.

 

-Contributed by MKTG New York summer intern Dan Andree

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3 Key Learnings from Digital Summit Atlanta 2015

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DS2

Digital Summit Atlanta, a gathering of some of the most forward thinkers in digital marketing, took place this week and I was proud to make it my 3rd time in attendance. Each year I have been able to discover new topics and discuss the next trends in digital marketing.

Overall, each year has followed its own theme as digital marketing as a whole evolves so quickly. In 2013, trends in how social media was changing for brands was explored in a lot of sessions. Last year it shifted to a major focus on content marketing and SEO. Now, at #DSUM15, the next stage in UX (User Experience) design seemed to be the key focus.

And with that, here are three key takeaways from the conference as it can relate to what we do in the experiential space…

1. Humanizing UX

Many of the sessions at Digital Summit really focused on UX as we were challenged to think of what was next in the field. For example, how do we run UX more lean and understand better, powered with ‘big data’, how to humanize someone’s digital experience. When we map out the consumer journey – remember that each user is an actual person with problems and needs.

When you look at bring a consumer through a brand experience for experiential this line of thinking makes a lot of sense, right? It is our expertise to bring brands to life in a way that they can interact with consumers as people and not anonymous IP addresses. However many activation designs we see in the field could do a better job from at the ideation stage to keep in mind that once launched, these are people with their own objectives who will walk through our ideas.

So when thinking through your consumer experience idea, map it out. Literally draw out each stage of the activation UX and use this tool to identify where the gaps are or more importantly, where it can be more streamlined.

2. Millennials are mobile-first…and are starting to earn a lot of money

When you hear the word “millennials” – how old of a person pops in your mind? Probably an early-20-something with new student debt maybe? Well consider that millennials are were born starting in 1980 and now are entering their mid-30s. Sure there is probably a healthy amount of debt still lingering – but this generation is now entering over a $Trillion in buying power and loves to spend.

So with all of this data we now have on the ‘Connected Generation’ – what have we learned about marketing to them? It’s a long answer but here are two quick tips from @annieg from StumbleUpon.

First, “6 is the new 60” – as in the 6” phone is more important than the 60” TV. Now that doesn’t mean the generation is consumer less video – in fact it’s more than ever. But reportedly 33% do not watch any broadcast TV.

Second, it seems obvious that millennials are connected to their mobile devices, sure, but how many experiences are being built mobile-first? When we consider social, if you stop to think why they are so effective with the connected generation it’s not just because they are social – but because the most popular experiences are mobile-first. Snapchat, Instagram, Vine…some of the most powerful platforms for the younger Millennials have excelled by being native to the 6” screen. So consider mobile-first experiences to connect and make an engagement that this group wants to use. After all, it is why the younger Millennials are now being known as Social Natives.

3. The Entrepreneur Wants to Solve a Problem

I heard a great line this year and it came during a keynote speaker Chris Brogan, whose content I highly recommend. To summarize:

Stop chasing innovation, which aims to just do something.

Be an entrepreneur, which aims to solve someone’s problem.

While this is absolutely a trap in creating the latest in digital experiences, it is also a trap in experiential marketing. Brands and agencies alike all want to innovate and create and truly great new things are activated in our space every year. But when coming up the ideas for the experience on the front end, don’t just try to chase an innovation for the sake of doing it. Instead, identify an audience’s problem and solve it. That is where the entrepreneurship mindset excels and where experiential marketing can truly make an in-person impact on someone.

If you are ever free in May, I highly recommend Digital Summit. This is only a small snipet of content from the 2-day conference. I still have to go through pages upon pages of notes but in the meantime, enjoy the learnings and feel free to find me @BradMEpstein if you want to go through my timeline where I shared some more real-time leanrings!

Bonus! PowerPoint is where data goes to die!

If you work with data (you should!) treat it as a living, breathing source. PowerPoint it becomes static and if 2015 taught me anything – is that static is kryptonite for the modern marketer. So learn new tools that keep you agile and keep your brand’s marketing velocity as fast as possible.

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Social Media: What Moves Your Audience

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Spaceballs_combFigure 1: Combing the desert in “Spaceballs”

There comes a time where photos of pancakes during Saturday brunch, random selfies in the park or outrageous political rants become too much handle on your social networks. It’s part of the reason why you un-friend someone on Facebook (in many instances on their birthdays), unfollow them on Twitter or block them on Snapchat. Simply put, it’s noisy and irrelevant.

Though we all crave constant interpersonal connectivity, many find that connection-based social networks and apps leave with you a tremendous rolodex of contacts and robust streams of content, but have shortcomings when trying to share with the people you really care about.

Matthew Bryan Beck, a NYC-based journalist and advertising strategist, exposes a timely topic of what he thinks is the future of social media: mobile tribes.

Just as tribes define membership by ‘different groups, movements, cultures or ideologies,’ we “band together in subpopulations of shared interests, tastes, demographics and marketplaces.” We, along with traditional tribes, then mobilize by choosing and controlling with whom we connect, communicate and share on a regular basis.

Brands and corporations – like consumers – seek to remain in control of how they engage their audiences. Where a Facebook ad spend or a Twitter buy may fall short in breaking through the noise, marketers invest in new platforms to camp out where their mobile consumer tribes roam. Though that’s much easier said than done. Beck asserts, “the age of the mega platform is over.” Consumers have become nomadic in their social-media sharing, app usage and content consumption, leveraging multiple platforms and devices simultaneously to tap into each of their disparate ecosystems.

At Bonfyre, we believe we align well with this trend. Each “bonfyre” is like it’s own ecosystem – an exclusive social network enabling brands to better engage their audiences with targeted, real-time consumer engagement around events and groups of people. The level of control is two-fold: participants “opt in” to the bonfyre – typically through a link, QR code or location-based invites – while the brand decides who’s invited, the content participants can receive and the manner in which they can share (“read-only” chat, moderation, etc.).

Ultimately, marketers should deploy an arsenal of apps, social media sites and experiences to better reach their tribes. There’s always a good story to tell, sometimes it’s just about camping out and listening in.

Seeking a mobile solution for your brand, client or organization? Contact us to learn more.

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Brands and the Audience Evolution

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Screen Shot 2014-04-30 at 2.42.30 PM

Frank Bruni wrote an interesting piece in the New York Times about what Princeton prof. Daniel Rodgers calls the “Age of Fracture.

The idea is, as our knowledge has gotten more specialized, there is less common ground that draws us together. Everyone is taking in content with their own customized feeds. Even at Princeton, in a room full of geniuses, the average teacher struggles to find common cultural references.

In the mid-70’s, America’s top rated show, All in the Family, drew 23% of all Americans. That means that almost 1 in 4 Americans were reacting to the same thing at the exact same time. Today, America’s top-rated show, NCIS, draws 1/16th of all Americans (7%), including those who DVR it.

Sure, there are a few cultural events (like the Super Bowl) that draw up to 35% of us, but on a regular basis, there is no MASS AUDIENCE anymore. Everything is going niche and finding a very specific following. Some of us are watching HBO and Netflix Original Series, some are watching cable and network series, and some of us simply watch videos through our social feeds.

The same is true of social networks.

Parents and brands joined Facebook, so influencers switched to Instagram. Then they moved to Instagram, so influencers migrated to Snapchat. Fred Wilson, the legendary investor who wisely invested in Twitter, Tumblr, Zynga, Etsy & Kickstarter, recently commented on this on a fascinating profile in Business Insider.

On Instagram, he says:

“A lot of the stuff that was on Instagram has now moved to Snapchat. It doesn’t mean that people are not using Instagram, but if I go back and look at my Instagram feed a year ago versus today, there’s a lot of people who were in my Instagram feed a year ago who aren’t there today. They’ve been replaced by brands.

So now my Instagram feed is full of things like the New York Knicks and restaurants posting amazing photos of food. The young Facebook user base who left Facebook to go to Instagram has now seemingly moved mostly to Snapchat and my generation (baby boomers) plus brands are what’s on Instagram now.”

So…what is the NEXT BIG Social network once all the brands and parents get to Snapchat? Maybe nothing! In an era of niches, there’s no next big network that has attained critical mass. Instead, there are a bunch of small communities forming that cater to specific interests with very devout followings. Here are a few of the communities that are developing:

There are communities for Musicians:  40 million musicians share their music with 200,000 listeners;

Communities for Students: a network of 34.2 MM students and teachers around the world that is dedicated to helping everyone become more educated;

…and even communities for Storytellers: 25 million people around the world writing and reading 40 million stories.

The landscape has changed, but there are still a lot of great ways to reach an audience. In fact, brands may have an easier job targeting their core consumers because these communities have done such a good job of singling out very specific demographics.

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