Archive for the ‘strategy’ tag

MKTG Insights: WHAT SPONSORS CAN LEARN FROM MODERN ALBUM RELEASES

with one comment

With the overly saturated music industry experiencing ever-changing shifts in music consumption, artists must find unique ways to gain traction within the market in order to create successful campaigns. Technological innovations such as digital streaming provided by service giants such as Spotify and Apple Music are truly shaping the industry. There is now a greater accessibility to music than ever before and artists can easily get lost in the clutter. The days where studios and labels put mass advertising behind the release of an album are gone. This has caused musicians to increasingly think like brands; relying on creativity and innovation to drive interest in their upcoming sales. Sponsors and marketers also live in a similar dynamic realm where there are constant technological changes and never ending clutter of branded content. The following are leading examples from the music industry that provide key learnings for marketers in today’s world.

In June 2017, in advance of the release of her “Witness” album, Katy Perry partnered with YouTube to launch a 96-hour live stream of her living day-to-day in a camera filled “Big Brother” style home. The live stream allowed fans to observe Perry in a range of content from average daily activities to more intense moments such as therapy sessions. The broadcast was supported with celebrity guest appearances who interacted with Katy for interviews, cooking, games, challenges, and conversations. The live stream led to a concert where Katy performed songs from the upcoming album. The Katy Perry Witness World Wide Live Stream reached 190 countries and garnered 49 million views.

Katy Perry provided fans with an opportunity to receive unprecedented access to celebrity. The raw, constant transparency that a live stream provides allows consumers to feel an authentic connection by being able to tune into an “unscripted” experience.

For sponsorship marketers, Perry’s stunt is a reminder of key operating principles when developing strategy and planning brand experiences. Perry understood the power of designing a brand experience that would organically drive social chatter. Rather than rely on media appearances on TV and radio to plug the album release like most artists, Perry’s live stream was designed for the digital age. By choosing the correct platform, in this case, YouTube, users were able to connect at any time (mobile, desktop etc.) for real-time interactions. The tactic of live streaming her activity scaled access to Perry in a way that transcended geographic borders and time constraints; sponsors planning physical branded experiences must also find ways to bring the consumer experience to those unable to engage in the precise time and place of the activation.

Notable hip-hop stars 2 Chainz and Kendrick Lamar are examples of artists who have utilized powerful physical, in-person brand experiences that coincide with particular promotional announcements. 2 Chainz released his fourth studio album titled “Pretty Girls like Trap Music” in June 2017 which was supported by a unique physical activation. Inspired by the emerging genre of Southern “trap music” that has been taking control of mainstream airways, 2 Chainz leverages “trap” roots by replicating a real life “trap house” in the outskirts of Atlanta, Georgia. The album themed, pink home is decked out with urban artwork and was redesigned to coincide with 2 Chainz branding and larger promotional campaign that matches 2 Chainz album art.

The activation’s main purpose was to be used as a space for listening parties. Supplementary, outside of the home, was a strategically place vintage pink Corvette and stove where visitors were encouraged to take photos and share their “trap experience” on social media. The activation was an enormous tourist and fan attraction, covered by major media outlets that accumulated over 300,000 digital tags.

Similarly, Kendrick Lamar kicked off “THE DAMN. TOUR” by launching retail pop-up shops in select cities that coincide with his tour dates. The pop-up shops sell limited-edition Kendrick branded clothing and accessories. Activations amplify traditional marketing efforts by providing a memorable and engaging consumer experience. Consumers are able to interact on a ground-level and share digitally. This activation style allows for ultimate consumer engagement that is enhanced with wide-spread media coverage.

High-touch activations act as a unique tactic to engage consumers by utilizing multiple touchpoints. These activations allow artists to push branded content online while also providing fans with a real and tangible interaction. Aside from relying solely on social media, high-touch activation experiences allow brands stand out amongst the clutter.

One of the most talked about releases in 2016 was Beyoncé’s sixth studio album, Lemonade. The surprise release was supported by a massive amount of content: a one hour HBO film, an eleven chapter visual album, and the launch of the Formation World Tour. Beyoncé leveraged a combination of art, music, poetry, and politics to create one of 2016’s best-selling albums that had a large impact in a variety of markets that surpassed the category of music.

The element of surprise can be one of the strongest marketing techniques. Brands that execute this type of disruptive promotion cause a change consumer behavior and trigger some of the strongest personal and digital dialogues. Due to the unexpected release, consumer behavior is altered and now brand focused. Fans and consumers erupt in a sense of urgency to dive deep into the branded content. This social eruption causes word-of-mouth marketing, which is seen as one of the top forms of influential advertising. Awareness is built exponentially, consumer emotions are supercharged and a passionate brand engagement is created.

With the recent need for artists to stand out with successful campaigns, the market is seeing a shift in promotional techniques from brands within the industry. Traditional efforts must now be altered and amplified with unique activations, disruptive marketing and brand authentication in order to create more of an impact.  By leveraging these case studies and insights, marketers can truly enhance a variety of brand experiences.

Share Button

Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

July 31st, 2017 at 12:58 pm

MKTG Takes Home Some Hardware at Event Marketer’s Experience Design & Technology Awards

with 2 comments

gatorade

MKTG won top honors at the 2016 EventTech/Event Marketer Experience Design & Technology Awards in Las Vegas. The ceremony is the world’s largest and only recognition program honoring the brands and partners creating the best-designed experiences and the most effectively “wired” engagements. Amid 1,000+ of the industry’s top event marketers, MKTG was in full force to accept their big wins, including:

Best Consumer Environment
Gold Winner
MKTG
Campaign: Gatorade Fuel Lab
Client: PepsiCo

Best Permanent or Pop-Up Retail Experience
Bronze Winner
MKTG
Campaign: The Levi’s Lot
Client: Levi’s

Huge shout outs to our awesome client partners Gatorade and Levis for whom we brought to life the touring Gatorade Fuel Lab & The Levi’s Lot at Super Bowl 50. Much gratitude. 

img_5032

–Contributed by MKTG Global Communications team

 

Share Button

Trends of the Trade: CES 2016

without comments

Another year, another CES, the infamous consumer electronics expo that beckons technocrati from around the globe to descend on the Las Vegas Strip each year—converting Sin City into a veritable shopping mall of the future for one fleeting week. Drawing in well over 3,800+ exhibitors and 170,000+ attendees each year, CES is an undisputed premier tech conference filled to the brim with the latest tech—from the mundane to the paradigm shifting. It’s here that innovators, brands, media, and marketers all collide and mingle to learn about what’s new, what’s next, and frankly just geek out at all the cool stuff.

While a good portion of the products on the show floor never quite make it to mass-market consumer adoption in the ways they are shown then. CES has never truly been about the short-term future; it’s been about pushing boundaries and expanding our definitions of what’s possible. A proof of concept, if you will, to show the world just how innovative the world can be. The present may be set, but the future is infinitely pliable. Naysayers and pessimists may call that outlook naïve, but you can’t get to the next big idea without a couple quirky first steps to help you along the way.

As our clients/brands become increasingly more comfortable exploring new technologies and emerging mediums of engagement, here’s what we’re seeing will be hot experiential trends for 2016:

INTIMACY

Wearables are here to stay. With the continued maturation of the industry and shift from fitness to health and wellness, expect to see them pop up more and more in brand activations as takeaways and experience enhancers. The form factor for sensors in general has become increasingly smaller and durable over the years, enabling one of the more intriguing items on the show floor this year to come to fruition: smart clothing. Companies such as Sensoria have utilized textile sensors to create more seamless / intuitive experiences, in this case a pair of sensor embedded socks that track your running (from run cadence to foot impact).

Sensors are getting even smarter. As all the tech companies race to bring the first fully autonomous car to market, the sensor industry (particularly, object detection and identification) has seen a huge boom in innovation. Netamo announced their outdoor security camera system “Presence to critical acclaim, the camera includes a robust identification software that can distinguish between people, cars, and animals with surprising speed and accuracy.

What does this all mean, you ask? Simple. Continued innovations in wearables and sensors represent a prime opportunity for marketers to create more engaging and dynamic personal experiences that are tailored to each consumer.

 

IMMERSION

At MKTG, we’ve been playing around with Virtual Reality for a couple of years now—carefully watching its development from a relatively unheard of niche gamer centric gizmo to a huge untapped new medium for filmmakers, artists, and brands.

2016 will be the year VR reaches critical mass. With the imminent release of high-end consumer facing VR (e.g. Oculus) later this year, and continued public interest for more mobile friendly VR (e.g. Gear VR and Google Cardboard), don’t expect to see the appetite for VR to drop any time soon.

The major VR players are pretty much set at this point: Oculus, HTC, Google, and Samsung. This year’s VR standouts at CES were mainly focused around hardware extensions for virtual reality environments. Products such as the Krush Moveo, Virtuix Omni, and Infinadeck all answer one problem that holds back full immersion in VR, movement.

While we’re still quite a ways off from a Star Trek like holodeck, with VR marketers have a unique opportunity to craft and deploy incredibly immersive experiences in virtually any location or condition.

INTEGRATION

IoT is the buzz word that inevitably gets thrown around each year at CES. While there is no shortage of smart products out in the marketplace, a clear winner for a universal/unified platform to manage all these smart devices has yet to emerge. As the public waits before taking the big plunge into smart homes, the industry has been busy creating micro-integrated ecosystems to whet consumers’ appetites. 

To that effect, as consumers expectations shift from what a specific product or service provides individually, to how does this product add value to a connected lifestyle, thinking big picture and integrated will continue to be more and more important to brands and marketers.

TL;DR: Ongoing developments in wearables, VR, and sensors will enable marketers to easily create more tailored, personal, and brand experiences/activations in 2016.

Share Button

Written by Chris Liao
Chris Liao

January 15th, 2016 at 12:00 pm

What’s In Your Wallet, Kerry?

without comments

FullSizeRender[4]

Have you looked at your business card recently? If not you should. MKTG INC’s cards are known for their unique perspective and purpose (the latter being expressly to embarrass their bearer, natch). This column takes a look at the business cards of our coworkers and hears the stories behind them. Here’s the story behind the business card of  Kerry Lange, VP, Strategy & Operations in MKTG INC’s San Francisco office.

Kerry knows how to connect people, ideas, strategies and the dots.
I am the epitome of a connector – Malcolm Gladwell could have written about me in The Tipping Point. If you need a job, have a job, or have any kind of need whatsoever, I can probably connect you to someone who can help.

I’m also one of those weird people who can instantly envision what an event or experience is going to look like, and can drill down to the nuts and bolts of how it’s all going to come to life. Guess that’s why I do Strategy and Operations.

From locally sourced bourbon brine to nationally recognized above-the-line, Kerry knows quite a bit about a lot of things. She can throw down on beacon technology while heating it up over bacon mixology. She can quote Blondie lyrics while spouting urban farm statistics.
Yes, this is dorky, but I actually read the dictionary and encyclopedia (as books!) in elementary school. I love to get into analytical discussions about whatever my current obsessions are – right now it’s cutting edge technology for events, the local and artisanal food movement, and always, music. Thankfully I live in San Francisco, which is a rich resource for all three. And I do a mean Blondie at karaoke!

Basically she IS ambient context identification, in human form. We definitely advise opting in.
I love the idea of getting the information I want, when I need it, in exactly the right context. iBeacons can be such a cool way to create a deeper connection and interactive experience, making you feel like you have the world right in your hand. Imagine attending Jazzfest, and while you’re walking around you get a notification that your favorite jambalaya stand is only 50 feet away, and that the blues musician you want to see starts in 15 minutes – makes it so much easier to plan the perfect day and not miss out on the things you love. I expect to see a lot more brands and events opting in to this awesome technology.

Share Button

DICK’S Sporting Goods Taps MKTG INC as Agency-of-Record

with 2 comments

dicks BEST

DICK’S Sporting Goods, the largest U.S.-based sporting goods retailer with more than 600 locations has chosen MKTG INC as its Event, Community and Experiential Agency-of-Record. We are tasked with providing strategy, planning, account management, as well as sponsorship activation of the 2015 DICK’S Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon, line-of-business expansion development and ongoing integration and positioning of community marketing managers.

“We have been working with MKTG for well over a year on several projects and have been so impressed with how, from strategy through to execution, they consistently over-deliver,” said Mark Rooks, DICK’S Sporting Goods Vice President of Sports and Community Marketing. “This is a really exciting time at DICK’S as we roll out several sponsorships and consumer and business-facing programs that MKTG will help us bring to market. We could not be more thrilled with our selection.”

“We are so proud of our great success and influence within the retail, sports, entertainment and community-building space over the years and have truly enjoyed working with DICK’S in helping them think differently about their sponsorship and engagement executions,” said Charlie Horsey, CEO, MKTG INC. “DICK’S Sporting Goods is loved by people of all ages, which makes developing strategies, to engage consumers and the DICK’S community so exciting by leveraging both digital tools and live activations that resonate.”

The account will lead by Kevin Collins, GM of MKTG’s Chicago office and the core team will include members form across the agency’s US footprint.

Share Button