Archive for the ‘Trends of the Trade’ tag

What Millennials Want to See (and Take Home) From Branded Events

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Illustration by: Carlos Monteiro

Illustration by: Carlos Monteiro

 

Everyone loves a good party, and brands know that. As more events are sponsored, the ways that brands interact with partygoers before and after is becoming more important.

Splash, creator of experiential marketing software, mined its data for trends among millennial partiers who attend branded events.

“The brands winning over the millennial generation are delivering experiences, not just things,” said Ben Hindman, co-founder, CEO of Splash. “The savviest marketers understand the crucial link between events and brand loyalty—particularly when it comes to millennials. If you’re not creating experiences and memories, you’re not building anything.”

For the full article, see here

Source: Adweek c/o Splash, the leader in innovative experiential marketing software. We are not affiliated with Splash but love these infographics and the insights. Thanks Splash! 

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Trends of the Trade: CES 2016

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Another year, another CES, the infamous consumer electronics expo that beckons technocrati from around the globe to descend on the Las Vegas Strip each year—converting Sin City into a veritable shopping mall of the future for one fleeting week. Drawing in well over 3,800+ exhibitors and 170,000+ attendees each year, CES is an undisputed premier tech conference filled to the brim with the latest tech—from the mundane to the paradigm shifting. It’s here that innovators, brands, media, and marketers all collide and mingle to learn about what’s new, what’s next, and frankly just geek out at all the cool stuff.

While a good portion of the products on the show floor never quite make it to mass-market consumer adoption in the ways they are shown then. CES has never truly been about the short-term future; it’s been about pushing boundaries and expanding our definitions of what’s possible. A proof of concept, if you will, to show the world just how innovative the world can be. The present may be set, but the future is infinitely pliable. Naysayers and pessimists may call that outlook naïve, but you can’t get to the next big idea without a couple quirky first steps to help you along the way.

As our clients/brands become increasingly more comfortable exploring new technologies and emerging mediums of engagement, here’s what we’re seeing will be hot experiential trends for 2016:

INTIMACY

Wearables are here to stay. With the continued maturation of the industry and shift from fitness to health and wellness, expect to see them pop up more and more in brand activations as takeaways and experience enhancers. The form factor for sensors in general has become increasingly smaller and durable over the years, enabling one of the more intriguing items on the show floor this year to come to fruition: smart clothing. Companies such as Sensoria have utilized textile sensors to create more seamless / intuitive experiences, in this case a pair of sensor embedded socks that track your running (from run cadence to foot impact).

Sensors are getting even smarter. As all the tech companies race to bring the first fully autonomous car to market, the sensor industry (particularly, object detection and identification) has seen a huge boom in innovation. Netamo announced their outdoor security camera system “Presence to critical acclaim, the camera includes a robust identification software that can distinguish between people, cars, and animals with surprising speed and accuracy.

What does this all mean, you ask? Simple. Continued innovations in wearables and sensors represent a prime opportunity for marketers to create more engaging and dynamic personal experiences that are tailored to each consumer.

 

IMMERSION

At MKTG, we’ve been playing around with Virtual Reality for a couple of years now—carefully watching its development from a relatively unheard of niche gamer centric gizmo to a huge untapped new medium for filmmakers, artists, and brands.

2016 will be the year VR reaches critical mass. With the imminent release of high-end consumer facing VR (e.g. Oculus) later this year, and continued public interest for more mobile friendly VR (e.g. Gear VR and Google Cardboard), don’t expect to see the appetite for VR to drop any time soon.

The major VR players are pretty much set at this point: Oculus, HTC, Google, and Samsung. This year’s VR standouts at CES were mainly focused around hardware extensions for virtual reality environments. Products such as the Krush Moveo, Virtuix Omni, and Infinadeck all answer one problem that holds back full immersion in VR, movement.

While we’re still quite a ways off from a Star Trek like holodeck, with VR marketers have a unique opportunity to craft and deploy incredibly immersive experiences in virtually any location or condition.

INTEGRATION

IoT is the buzz word that inevitably gets thrown around each year at CES. While there is no shortage of smart products out in the marketplace, a clear winner for a universal/unified platform to manage all these smart devices has yet to emerge. As the public waits before taking the big plunge into smart homes, the industry has been busy creating micro-integrated ecosystems to whet consumers’ appetites. 

To that effect, as consumers expectations shift from what a specific product or service provides individually, to how does this product add value to a connected lifestyle, thinking big picture and integrated will continue to be more and more important to brands and marketers.

TL;DR: Ongoing developments in wearables, VR, and sensors will enable marketers to easily create more tailored, personal, and brand experiences/activations in 2016.

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Written by Chris Liao
Chris Liao

January 15th, 2016 at 12:00 pm

Does This Phone Make My Butt Look Big?

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old-cell-phonesPhoto Credit: www.cycledcells.com

Recently turning 42 made me do some thinking. Not about being a better person or climbing Mt. Everest. No, something hit me. The extremism that populated my youth seems to have evaporated. Back then, a few years time would drastically change the pop culture landscape. Think about it – disco, then new wave, followed by hair metal, indie, grunge and all of this was surrounded by equally absurd fashion trends. If one joined the Peace Corps and went off the grid for a couple of years, they would return to find a superficially very different country from the one they left behind.

But then, at some point in the late-90s, extremism seemed to fade out. Take a look at the cast of a pop culture phenomenon, like Friends, in 2000, and you’re probably not going to find anything particularly laughter-inducing about their appearance. Sure we’ve progressed, but that was 12 years ago. Just imagine people in 2000 sporting 1988 looks and listening to crap hair metal with crunch perms and fringed acid washed denim jackets – they would have been laughed out of the room.

I somehow picked up on this trend of non-trends through the last decade and complacently updated my clothes and haircuts only when absolutely necessary. No one seemed to particularly care or notice. That was until several years ago when I was at a meeting and working for a former employer. The iPhone had recently come out and, always the practical one, I felt that my old Samsung phone still worked just fine. It was a FLIP PHONE after all. I was sitting in a client meeting flanked by my two superiors and threw my phone on the table to make sure I didn’t miss anything important. The shock in the room was palpable and my boss hissed at me to hide it. He actually physically removed the phone from the table and threw it back into my backpack. After the meeting, he curtly explained that my phone was, quite simply, an embarrassment to the company and “did I not realize that I was eligible for a company iPhone?” That’s when it dawned on me – outdated technology is the new mullet.

Don’t believe me? Next time you go to a meeting and ESPECIALLY a meeting with new clients or potential agency partners, watch how fast everyone is to flaunt their phones, iPads, iPad Minis, Macbooks, and whatever the hell else they pull from their Jack Spade bags. They can walk in looking like hobos but their technology gives them an instant pass to legitimacy.

But then again, I can’t help but wonder – maybe I’m just old?

Written by: Greg Williams

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Written by Admin
Admin

November 20th, 2012 at 5:23 pm

Boomerangers Are Back

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Photo-Credit-Jason-BachePhoto Credit: Jason Bache

TREND ALERT: Gen Yers are taking advantage of “Hotel Mom” now more than ever before.  To find out tips on how to market boomerangers and their parents (and do it right), read what MKTG INC’s President & CEO Charlie Horsey has to say in this week’s B-2-C here.  This may hit close to home…

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

May 22nd, 2012 at 6:55 pm