Archive for the ‘US’ tag

The OtterBox OtterTour is on the road again!

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From the OtterBox Blog:

It’s summer concert season, and OtterBox is taking protection on the road with the 2015 OtterTour – a cross-country trek to festivals all over the U.S.

Join us as we travel the country to make the case to protect your smartphone. You will be able to check out the OtterTour truck for opportunities to play games, win cases and learn about the wide variety of premium protective solutions available for the latest smartphones and tablets.

Follow us on Twitter at @OtterBox for VIP ticket giveaways, behind the scenes content and chances to win prizes for the duration of the OtterTour. Tweet along with use using the hashtag #OtterTour – and if you see the Otter Tour Truck on the road, tweet us a photo for your chance to win!

Check out our tour dates and locations HERE. See you on the road!

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Happiness abounds on the #OtterTour!

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Follow the tour by searching for #OtterTour

 

 

 

 

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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

September 4th, 2015 at 12:20 pm

Merry Happy Christmas from MKTG LDN

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MKTGers, it’s holiday season at last, and for those of us in the UK office, that means terrific confusion on holiday traditions and vocabulary. To help alleviate the anxiety, below is glossary of holiday terms in common use over here in the British Isles. Brilliant.

1. Christmas “Sweater” vs Christmas “Jumper“: They both look equally tacky at Christmas parties, they’re just called something different on opposite sides of the pond. Likewise, you can jump in a jumper as easily as you can sweat in a sweater. Again, brilliant.jumper

2. Cheers: While Americans serve eggnog, an odd concoction of milk, sugar, eggs and brandy, during the holidays, the Brits have their own weird festive drink: the Wassail (from the phrase meaning “good health” in Old English), which consists of hot mulled cider or wine.  The common denominator in all of this is, of course…booze. Cheers indeed.

3. Christmas Crackers: We implore you, please do not eat a Christmas cracker, even if it does kind of look like a wrapped candy. A Christmas cracker is actually a gift tube that hold treats, bad jokes and paper crowns. The highly competitive moment when all family members converge to pull apart their crackers with a pop is the stuff of family legend across Britain. Word of advice, though: don’t try opening one on an airplane. Trust me on this point.

Children-pulling-a-Christ-007     4. The Royal Christmas Message: Every Christmas Day at 3pm, the Queen addresses all of the UK to personally wish everyone a happy and healthy New Year. And to you, your majesty!

     5. Black Friday vs Boxing Day: The biggest shopping day of the year has different names on either side of the pond. In the US  it’s called Black Friday and happens the day after Thanksgiving. The British call their day Boxing Day, but it happens the day after Christmas and isn’t nearly as scary.

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Guinness ICC 2014: Soccer, Smirnoff Ice and Setting Records

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With the excitement of a thrilling World Cup still in the air, soccer fans across the US had little time to catch their breath as the largest soccer tournament in America was upon them. For the second year in a row, Guinness was the title sponsor of the International Champions Cup (ICC), a two-week tournament pitting some of the best soccer clubs from around the world against one another right here in the United States. This year, Cristiano Ronaldo and Real Madrid sought to defend their 2013 title against Liverpool, Manchester City, Manchester United, FC Inter, AC Milan, AS Roma and Olympiacos.

The tournament spanned 12 US cities, drawing in over 640,000 passionate fans to the stadiums and exponentially more through live broadcasting on NBC Sports, Fox Sports 1 and Fox Network Television. The ICC made its presence known, appearing several times on ESPN’s Top 10 plays (including Wayne Rooney’s awesome goal in the final match). Most impressive, perhaps, was the Manchester United vs Real Madrid match in Ann Arbor, Michigan where 109,318 fans filled “The Big House,” accounting for the largest crowd to ever watch a professional soccer game in the US. The irony of Guinness setting a record is not lost here.

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All ICC stadium events featured a Guinness Beer Garden providing avid fans with cold beer, giveaways and MKTG INC staff. MKTG INC also executed 161 events at designated local Fan Hubs across the ICC cities, where consumers competed in prop pick contests to win premium Guinness soccer swag and received complimentary beer samples. These events coincided with televised ICC matches and drew even more viewers for the tournament.

MKTG INC also managed the sampling of portfolio-partner Smirnoff Ice at the Dallas and Miami events. Over 2,400 consumers (21+) sampled Smirnoff Ice Original, Screwdriver and Watermelon Mimosa across these two events. Many had never tasted the brand before but eagerly welcomed the ice cold product on those blistering hot days. Both Guinness and Smirnoff Ice saw impressive sales at the stadiums, further establishing them as drinks of choice when watching soccer.

In the end, Manchester United faced off against its heated rival Liverpool in front of a roaring crowd of over 50,000 fans in Miami. After a slow start, Wayne Rooney and his Manchester United team rallied an exciting comeback to win 3-1, claiming the 2014 International Champions Cup as their own. Once again, Guinness treated fans to some of the best soccer the world has to offer right in their own backyards. While it may have only been considered a friendly, the passion, records and bragging rights are certainly real.

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