Archive for the ‘USA’ tag

FedEx Extends NFL League Deal, Looks For Closer Ties With International Series Games

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FedEx will continue sponsoring the Air & Ground Players of the Week Awards. Financial terms of the multiyear extension were not disclosed. (Ben Liebenberg via AP)

FedEx has extended its long-running sponsorship of the NFL to stay on as the official delivery service partner of the league, the Super Bowl and Pro Bowl.

By John Bauernfeind, Staff Writer, @SBJSBD

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Source: SportsBusiness Daily
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Written by Stephanie Rudnick
Stephanie Rudnick

April 27th, 2017 at 10:27 am

DENTSU AEGIS NETWORK TAKES TIME OUT WITH…MARLENA EDWARDS, VP of MKTG HR

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Our partners at Dentsu Aegis Network (DAN) recently launched a series spotlighting leaders throughout our network called Time Out with…, and their first profile features MKTG’s very own Marlena Edwards, VP of HR. DAN North America Comms leaders Belle Lenz and Megan Madaris chat with Marlena, delving into her 11-year career with MKTG, from starting off in an entry-level role to leading her department. It’s a fascinating conversation that you should add to your reading list  and will be a recurring series moving forward, found on Medium.com.


DAN: So let’s set the stage here. Tell us a little bit about where you’re from and how this all started.

ME: I’m from Rochester, NY, upstate. I’ve been in New York City since 2002 and can’t see myself living anywhere else. I live in Bed Stuy, Brooklyn. It’s one of those areas that’s just on the cusp of being gentrified, but you still get all of your services and it’s still pretty cool and edgy. I love it.

DAN: You run HR for MKTG. How did you find your way into it?

ME: That’s an interesting story. It’s really about being prepared for opportunity more than anything else. I didn’t go to school for it. Never imagined a career in HR. From the time I was eight I always thought I was going to be a lawyer. I got a scholarship to law school, but by the time I finished my first year I was questioning what I signed up for. It became really apparent that it just wasn’t that kind of idealized Law & Order kind of lawyer vs. the real life monotony of being in a court room and arguing the same thing every day. So I took some time off law school and I got a job to support myself and after a few years I needed to figure out what I wanted my career to be. I talked to a recruiter and at the time I was working in operations, but my manager had me involved in a lot of employee relations, doing some payroll, etc.

The recruiter asked me if I’d ever thought about HR and as opportunity would have it I was working in more of an operations role at MKTG. I submitted my letter of resignation to take another position more in line with what I was going for with HR in the non-profit sector. An HR employee at MKTG told me that they knew I wanted to be in HR and recognized how hard I worked and my determination and they wanted to give me an opportunity in HR at MKTG.

Literally, just like that they gave me my first opportunity as an entry-level HR person at MKTG, going on 11 years ago. Every year has been an education in HR since, but that’s how it all began.

 


DAN: So that was 11 years ago. Wow. What has that journey been like for you?

ME: So I think the journey for me has been really kind of significant and similar to a lot of our other MKTG employees. What I love is that MKTG really allows you to own your business and work autonomously and if you can step up to the plate and you’re prepared and you can show people that you’re providing a service and a benefit, there’s always opportunity. Whether it was working on small acquisitions; rebranding and thinking about our culture and what we want to change; introducing a new program in terms of employee recognition; doing surveys and listening to employees and understanding why we were having people thinking about leaving and understanding how important learning and development was… as long as I was able to build a case and present that to our leadership team, I was always given the opportunity to rise to the challenge. Year after year after year there was always some business challenge that called for HR support and I was able to provide a service to our leaders. And 11 year’s later, here I am!

DAN: Is it what you expected? What has surprised you?

ME: Absolutely not! People ask me all the time what makes me stay because 11 years in the advertising/marketing space is unheard of. But every day is a new day. We do a lot of experiential work rooted in events and having employees in 40 different states spanning a number of different industries from sports to wine and spirits, you have a lot of factors that can lead to so many precarious situations. So if it’s someone wanting an alligator at an event, I need to know what our liability is as a company for having that happen. That’s an HR issue because I need to understand our insurance policies and what that means. Or if we’re going to open an office in London, what does that mean about hiring people, and visas, etc. So really having the opportunity to spread my wings and learn and identify mentors — like other HR leads across the Dentsu Aegis Network — have allowed me to learn about situations I hadn’t experienced yet.

DAN: How has it been to grow as a leader within the same company? Some people move jobs every couple of years to get promoted or ascend but it’s different to do that in the same company.

ME: It is, it’s very different. It takes a lot of self awareness and hard work because when you are being promoted from within people see you in the role that you came in as and it’s a constant reminder. But if you have a manager or a support system that really believes in your contribution, like I have had, they are championing you 100%. They say, “she has a voice, it’s important and we need to make sure we’re listening to it.” It can be difficult but if you have the right team around you it can work. And if you find a place that you’re comfortable, why not stay there and grow?


DAN: Have you had any career defining moments that stick out to you?

ME: The one thing is definitely submitting my letter of resignation and having someone come to you and say they recognize something in you. That has always pushed me to make sure that I’m always doing my best and it’s not always easy. Sometimes you want to take the easy way out but someones always looking and noticing, so that was the most defining moment for me.

The other moment may be before MKTG was acquired, there was a more senior HR person and I remember being asked if I wanted to be considered for this potential role. I was less senior than I am now of course but I remember being all “yes, sure!” You’re young, you’re ambitious and you want to get it done. Well we had a board at the time and after a week or so the team circled back and explained that one board member thought I needed more experience before they could think about me for that role. I took it really hard and I had to sit down and acknowledge that to someone who didn’t work with me day to day and from the outside looking in I had only been at the company for five or six years, without a huge amount of HR experience, so it made sense.

Once we got through that together they saw me as their person for that role. Showing that you’re there doing your best is always going to work in your favor.

It was a blow of course. It took some time, but there were some challenges that came through the business and I was able to partner with some of our senior leaders and they saw that I could rise to the occasion, stand there in the difficult times and support them. And then once we got through that together they saw me as their person for that role. Again, showing that you’re there doing your best is always going to work in your favor.

Two times that I didn’t think things would work in my favor but some how, some way, they did.

DAN: What would your advice be in that moment when you think you’re nailing it, at the top of your game, and someone says “you are, but you’re not quite where we need you to be”? How do you deal with that?

ME: One of the biggest things I’ve learned is you really do have to be self aware. You have to step outside of yourself and really listen to and hear the feedback that you’re getting. You need to be able to get that feedback and adjust and pivot as necessary.

DAN: And get visibility…

ME: Absolutely. Visibility is really really big. The larger the organization, the harder it is but you have to make that effort to get that visibility and make sure that people understand how you’re contributing.

Location: The Roxy Hotel, Tribeca, NYC


DAN: Do you ever talk to your teams about executive presence? How do you think about that?

ME: I definitely think that it’s important at all levels to think about executive visibility. From an HR perspective, you never know how people are going to react to the information that you give them. You always want to make sure that you’re representing the department you come from and the company in the appropriate light. What’s good about our organization is that whether you’re talking about our COO, or our CEO, they’re very entrepreneurial people who ask all employees what the they think about different ideas. They’re really all about the think tank approach. So if our employees have ideas I always encourage them to take it to the table, but it’s really about how you take it to the table. Are you able to show the benefit to the company? It can’t just be us spending money all the time. What’s the value? Talking to employees about how they position themselves whether they’re entry or junior level, there’s still a contribution to be made. It doesn’t have to be this huge thing.


DAN: On the flip side of that, people say that HR is a people business and I’m sure you encounter individuals who are not at their best dealing with difficult situations. Do you have any tips for how you help people problem solve those sorts of issues?

ME: When you’re talking to managers who are having a difficult time with employees, they usually are just looking at behaviors. Counseling them on the factors that really lead to those behaviors, and that those factors are what you really need to address with the employee is what’s been most helpful in my experience. I find that when you’re talking to people honestly and transparently, they’re more apt to be honest and upfront and come to a consensus with you. We often get involved in “this is what I want, and this is what you need to do,” type of thinking, and that never goes well. The questions should be more like “What’s going on with you? What can I do to help you?” and a lot of times people don’t come from that “What can I do” perspective when they feel like the other person is in the wrong.

Also, just try to be objective and take all the personal out of it. I’m really proud of counseling people out of some really disastrous situations. There have been quite a few over the years and you’d think people would never be able to stand in the same room with one another again, and after sitting down, really laying everything on the table, as long as there’s mutual respect there, I don’t think there’s anything that can’t be overcome. Respect sometimes means, I need to address really difficult things with you and this just might not be the right fit. Even though that’s a tough pill to swallow, people respect it and they understand it.

It’s the age old rule, talk to people and deal with people the way that you’d want to hear and receive that information and it goes a long way.


DAN: What are some of the biggest misconceptions about HR?

ME: Ha. That you always have to be careful about what you say! When I meet people at different agencies or in different walks of life they always say they would never imagine that I would be an HR person. Or we go out to dinner or have cocktails after work and people will be like, “oh we can’t talk about this cause HR is here.” We’re not judging you. We’re not here to judge people, we don’t do that. You should look at HR personnel as a resource. We are here to help you get the work done; to help support the business. We like to have fun doing it and we are a part of the culture and the fabric of the business. Talk to us like you’d talk to anybody else. If you’re crossing a line or getting a little fuzzy, we’ll let you know, but utilize HR. I think a lot of people are a little apprehensive when they hear HR or they always thing it’s negative, and it’s not. I encourage people to seek out their HR partners because we’re working with the leaders of the organization to implement change and cultural initiatives and we can help push that forward.

DAN: What do you think makes a good leader? How do you foster a culture of leadership at MKTG?

ME: I think a good leader is somebody who hears their employees and listens to hear not to respond — that’s one of my favorite sayings. A good leader allows their team to drive their business and hears out their concerns . A leader’s job is to listen to that real concern and figure out how to fix it. It might not be fixed in three days or three months, but they’re going to put a plan in place to make sure that the organization is supporting everyone. No good leader wants to do the work of the people on their team; they want to empower their team to run with it.

Listen to hear not to respond — that’s one of my favorite sayings.

 


DAN: You’ve been with MKTG for 11 years. How do you stay engaged?

ME: I think our industry keeps me engaged. It is ever changing and every two years, it’s a reinvention. We have to make sure we are up-skilling our employees and that we understand what tools they need. What worked two years ago is no longer relevant so it keeps HR and the business busy. There’s so much data and information that we have to stay at the forefront of, that it constantly keeps me engaged. If I was working at a bank maybe I’d say nothing has changed in the last 11 years, but in media and advertising it’s constantly changing so you have to always be at the forefront to understand how to take you business forward.

DAN: Is that stressful?

ME: Haha. Yes, constant change is totally stressful. You have to break it down into bite size pieces and prioritize where you’re going to put your focus. It’s funny we have really focused on learning and development over the last year, and it’s super important to us. We’ve visited the MIT Media Lab, we use General Assembly, offer a Keynote course. It didn’t seem like a big deal if you weren’t a creative to know Keynote but now your client services teams are creating decks and they need to know about how to present. We’ve had to refocus on what’s important. It’s not necessarily about how to put a PowerPoint together, but about how to respond to client needs. We recognize that there needs to be a certain look and feel to everything that we present and that all of our employees need to be able to contribute at that same level. It keeps me motivated to see how engaged our people are with the learning and development opportunities we’re offering. It is stressful though, there’s no way around it. It takes a lot of time, energy and support to identify the people aligned with the company vision who will help you get the work done. That’s what keeps me motivated. I have a great team.

DAN: Is there anything outside of work that helps you destress?

ME: I love to travel. I just tried to take a trip to Bermuda in the middle of a hurricane, which I didn’t make it to… But I love to travel. For me, the perfect vacation is a little bit of beach/rest/relaxation, a bit of culture and a little bit of adventure. So I’ve taken some great trips, would probably say Turkey was so far the best one because there was just so much to do and see. I’ve been to Costa Rica, Morocco, Spain, Paris, London… every year I try to do one big trip and next year is the big 4–0 so I’m planning a big one.

DAN: Do you unplug when you go on these trips?

ME: Sometimes yes and sometimes no. I commit to checking in just twice a day and at most an hour each time I check in. So I give myself very limited times. I think in our world you’re never truly able to turn off. If you plug in and there’s nothing major going on it’s fine to step away again but you kind of have to check in and see what’s going on because things change so rapidly.

DAN: What does a weekend look like for you?

ME: Generally it starts out in Manhattan. I work out, just because I have to! I joined ClassPass and some of my favorite classes are around here [Tribeca]. So the day starts with a workout and I am a firm believer in walking around local cafes and shops, so I’ll just put on my walking shoes and walk. Sometimes from Bed Stuy all the way across the Brooklyn Bridge and around Manhattan. One of my key rules is that I’ll stay at work as long as I need to (whether that be 8 or 9 o’clock at night) but when I go home, I don’t take my computer home with me on weeknights or the weekend. Everything can generally be answered by email on my phone, if needed. That is my firm rule to have some downtime. Monday through Friday, I’ll give you all the hours you need and then on the weekends and after hours I turn it off.


DAN: Have you ever had any resistance to that?

ME: Never. The model at MKTG is that as long as the work is getting done people don’t generally care about the hours or when or how you do the work, as long as you’re being responsive to the business needs.

The clothes that I wear are really my armor. Our industry can be very casual and people always ask why I’m so dressed up, but I think that being a woman you sometimes have to put that armor on so that you get that respect.

DAN: Do you have any good luck charms or rituals that you do/wear before a big meeting or other important occasions?

ME: Not necessarily any good luck charms but I love fashion. The clothes that I wear are really my armor. As you know our industry can be very casual and people always ask why I’m so dressed up, but I think that being a woman you sometimes have to put that armor on so that you get that respect. Coming up in the industry and being promoted from within, fashion has always been a way to project a confident exterior that leads the interior along, and pushes me forward.

DAN: Do you have any advice specific to women coming up in their career?

ME: My first HR opportunity was because someone saw that spark in me and it was because of that person’s mentorship that I am where I am today. One of the things that I’ve learned is to always keep that door open. When I see talent or someone who is trying to take that next step I try to offer advice and pointers because it’s also about perception. People rarely tell you — especially if it’s not positive — how you’re perceived in an organization. Having a good mentor helps you get those pointers to figure out the changes that need to be made so that you can grow in your career. Even just making a connection with one person who you look up to and who can impart wisdom, who can give you real coaching and life advice, will be extremely valuable. It doesn’t have to be time consuming, but it has to be someone who understands where you want to be, your contribution and are willing to give you honest advice. If nobody tells you, you’re never going to learn.

I remember my mentor telling me that I always interpreted things as very black and white, but that in our industry there’s a lot of grey and you have to find out how you’re going to navigate in the grey. She warned me that you’re going to put a lot of people off by always saying no. You can be the best at what you do but if no one wants to work with you, there’s no point in having you here. It’s some of the best advice I’ve ever gotten and I’ve had to learn how to live in the grey. And I still do to this day.


–Contributed by DAN North America Communications team and MKTG 

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MKTG Hires Amy Kemp As SVP, Global Hospitality, Sport & Entertainment

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Amy Kemp joins MKTG

Amy Kemp joins MKTG

FROM EVENT MAGAZINE:

Posted on October 5, 2016 by Kim Benjamin

Global lifestyle marketing agency MKTG has recruited Amy Kemp to the role of SVP, global hospitality, sport and entertainment.

In this global role, reporting to Matt Manning, MKTG’s head of international development, Kemp will lead the agency’s rapidly expanding international hospitality business, splitting her time between MKTG’s London and New York offices.

Kemp brings more than 25 years’ experience in sport and entertainment, including more than 10 years running her own UK-based global business hospitality agency, Kempster, and technology provider, VIP Experience. Over the course of her career, she helped pioneer how brands like Castrol, McDonald’s, Capital One, T-Mobile and BP harnessed the world’s biggest sporting events.

Manning said: “Given MKTG’s rapidly-growing global footprint and position within the Dentsu Aegis Network as a leading sports consulting and marketing resource, expanding our existing hospitality offering along with our sister agency Team Epic, was a natural next step in our evolution. There is a tremendous opportunity in the space and combining Amy’s experience with Team Epic’s 25-year track record, as well as our global network, will ensure solid, creative, sustainable growth.”

Kemp added: “I’m thrilled to be part of this incredible global network. Having founded my own businesses, and worked for entrepreneurs for many years prior, I’m excited about creating and innovating within such a strong, multi-faceted organisation. It’s a privilege to join the team, to grow a business sector in which we’re already so active.”

MKTG rebranded from PsLive earlier this year, as a result of its merger with partnership and sponsorship marketing agency Dentsu Aegis Network Sports and Entertainment.

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Written by Andrea D'Alessandro
Andrea D'Alessandro

October 5th, 2016 at 4:01 pm

Navigating Olympic Advertising- Rule 40

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The Olympics have been setting social media into a frenzied spin, yet your brands probably won’t be able to talk about it! Here at MKTG we have great experience in rights holder restrictions and helping brands navigate them to gain traction with creative ideas. We’ve been inundated by brands and network agencies asking us what can and can’t be done with advertising around the Olympics.

The phrase ‘Rule 40′ sends shudders down most marketers’ spines but what does it actually mean and how can you navigate your brands around these murky, hazardous waters?

In theory, Rule 40 stops the over-commercialisation of the Olympics but practically, it simply gives the IOC a way to prevent non-sponsors, athletes and your local bakery from hijacking the Olympics’ valuable brand terms and logos.

Generally speaking Rule 40 has actually been relaxed – contrary to many scare mongering reports. As of this year, the IOC now allow generic non-Olympic sponsor advertising during the period of the Games, provided it had been approved before March 2016 and is clearly part of a longer term marketing campaign (i.e. not just for the two weeks of the Games).

But what does that mean if your brand didn’t apply for these sanctions?  If you’re not an official sponsor like P&G, Coca-Cola or Visa, even posting about the Olympics on social media during the official blackout period — which started last Wednesday and ends on 24th August — can be like doing the 100-yard dash down Oxford Street trying to catch the rarest of Pokemon (if you didn’t get that analogy; it’s a minefield!).

Even, words such as ‘2016’, ‘effort’ and ‘Olympian’ cannot be used by non-approved sponsors in any sort of advertising.

Here’s a guide to the restrictions against business activity during the games:

    You can’t use hashtags that include Olympics trademarks such as #TeamGB or #Rio2016.
    You cannot use any official Olympics logos.
    You cannot post any photos taken at the Olympics.
    You can’t feature Olympic athletes in your social posts.
    You can’t even wish them luck.
    Don’t post any Olympics results.
    You can’t share anything from official Olympics social media accounts. Even retweets are prohibited.
    You cannot create your own version of Olympic symbols, “whether made from your own logo, triangles, hexagons, soda bottle tops, onion rings, car tires, drink coasters, basketballs, etc.”
    Do not host an Olympic- or Paralympic-themed contest or team-building event for employees.

These are just the top line restrictions, there are further phrases and terminology that brands are restricted from using.

In summary, the IOC are trying to protect the investment of their partners and prevent competitor brands from jumping on the positive sentiment of the Olympics.

What are the penalties?  Well, if you break these rules, you will first likely be sent a cease and desist letter, demanding that you remove the content.  The next step would be for the local Olympic Committee taking legal action against your business.  As such, the policing of this will be dependent on the strength and commitment of the local Olympic Committee – here in GB and also in USA, they are pretty hot on it, as you’d expect.

But non-sponsor brands can still participate in the Olympics conversation by creatively latching onto specific moments during the games, as Oreo did with its on-the-fly “you can still dunk in the dark” tweet during the Super Bowl blackout. This means establishing a war-room type strategy, when something uplifting or nerve-wracking happens. Other brands are using individual influencers (such as former Olympians) to help get their messages out during the Games. So, with the right message and the right brand, there will be opportunities to talk about it.  Remember to also run any campaign ideas for the Olympics past your local Legal team.

Ultimately, we have to think a little bit differently – don’t think of it as, “How are we going to get around the rule?'” but more, “How are we going to work within the rule, and what’s our tone of voice?”

 

–Contributed by Charlie Powell, MKTG UK 

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Written by Andrea D'Alessandro
Andrea D'Alessandro

August 9th, 2016 at 3:34 pm

NIKE Surprises Soccer Fans with the Launch of Hypervenom II in NYC with US Women’s National Team

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Photo 2USWNT forward Megan Rapinoe and some very happy soccer stars

Last week on May 27th on the rooftop of Niketown in midtown Manhattan, Nike premiered the Hypervenom II cleats exclusively for dozens of girls from the Intense Soccer Academy’s U17 and U10 teams. In addition to trialing the brand new cleat, the soccer fanatics were taken through drills like the pros by members of the US Women’s National Team. In between tears of joy and excitement, the girls got to play alongside their idols who they will be cheering on come next week when the 2015 FIFA Women’s World Cup kicks off in Canada. GO USA!

Photo 1Some of the girls from the ISA’s U10 team eagerly awaiting their surprise…and they had no idea it would be the members of the US Women’s National Soccer Team

Photo 3The group before their workout on the roof of Niketown NYC with the USWNT

The Hypervenom II is available for trials in the Women’s World Cup Box at Niketown New York exclusively and will be available for sale on June 4th.

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Top Five Drinks You’ll Be ‘Bragh’ging About on St. Patrick’s Day

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On St. Patrick’s Day—Tuesday, March 17—millions of people around the world will don green and celebrate the Irish with parades, good cheer, and of course, a drink! To spice up your beverage selection in anticipation of the holiday, we will be releasing one recommendation each day for the next 5 days. We hope to help you and your loved ones sip on some traditional Irish libations, as well as inspire you to add some twists to timeless classics. No matter where the celebrations take you, we encourage you to try these out responsibly.

Although we all enjoy celebrating every year in March, many don’t know the real reason behind the festivities. St. Patrick was the Patron Saint of Ireland, but like so many of us participating in this holiday, he wasn’t even Irish. He was born in Britain, and died on March 17, 461. The celebration in memory of his death was first observed in the United States in Boston, Massachusetts in 1737. Throughout the centuries it has turned into a worldwide celebration that everyone can enjoy (not just the Irish Catholics!). St. Paddy’s day is particularly large in America, as there are 39.6 million US residents with Irish ancestry, and tons more who are just Irish for the day!

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Our first suggestion, believe it or not, is “the most talked about American Blonde in years.” While many of you may be thinking Taylor Swift or Channing Tatum, it’s actually the Guinness Blonde American Lager.

Guinness goes Blonde with the first beer released in their new highly anticipated discovery series.  And we promise, this link to American Blondes is completely safe for work!

This beer is the first collaboration between the Guinness Factory in Dublin, Ireland and the Latrobe Brewery in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, USA. It is made with the 125-year-old traditional Guinness yeast, but reimagined with American hops and brewing techniques. We think that this is the perfect beer for Americans celebrating St. Pat on this side of the pond! After all, everyone loves an Irish-American blonde, don’t they?

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For day two we present to you a beer with a fun and rebellious spirit: Smithwick’s!

To sound authentic when ordering this at the bar, make sure to pronounce it “Smiddicks”.

Smithwick’s is the oldest Irish red ale style beer from Kilkenny, Ireland. Complete with hints of caramel, orange marmalade, campfire smoke and fresh citrus, this complex beverage is sure to be one of your favorites beyond the holiday.

It has always been a fan favorite. When it was first sent to America in 1950, the whole shipment was stolen off the docks of the Boston Harbor. It was so good that the locals kept it for themselves, rather than dumping it into the water.

We suggest pairing this ale with a burger, meatloaf, steak or a margarita pizza. We have found it to be particularly enjoyable with sharp cheddar and mild blue cheeses.

For those of you who prefer a lighter beer, we suggest the new Smithwick’s Pale Ale.

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On day three we suggest a timeless and delicious classic: Baileys.

-2,300: Glasses of Baileys enjoyed every minute around the world.
-180: Countries where Baileys is sold.
-50: Percent of spirits exported from Ireland bare the Baileys label.
-220 Million: Liters of milk used to make the fresh cream in Bailey’s each year; 38,000 dairy cows produce the milk on 1,500 farms, primarily on Ireland’s east coast.

While there are endless concoctions that can be bolstered with the delicious Irish cream, our favorite way to enjoy Baileys is on the rocks. A tip from the pros: put your glass in the freezer a few hours in advance for a frosty chill.

Looking to switch it up from the classic? Baileys has many new and exciting flavors. Try out Chocolate Cherry, Salted Caramel, and Vanilla Cinnamon this St. Paddy’s day.


On day 4 we suggest a drink that both bourbon lovers and beer enthusiasts can enjoy: a Wilde Old Fashioned. Named after the legendary Irish poet and writer Oscar Wilde, this cocktail combines a rich tradition with a bold new twist.

You might have expected for us to choose an Irish whiskey for this cocktail, but our favorite cocktails are built with bourbon. They have more flavor and complexity than whiskeys, which means they won’t get lost in the drink! So, keeping with the theme of celebrating St. Pat’s influence on the culture of Ireland, we chose to mix the bourbon with distinctly Irish Guinness!

Wilde Old Fashioned Recipe
1.5 oz Bulleit Bourbon
1 oz Guinness Extra Stout
.5 oz Rich Simple Syrup
Dash Angostura

1. Stir all ingredients in an ice filled mixing glass.
2. Strain over large ice cube.
3. Garnish with a large orange peel

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Happy St. Patrick’s Day Lads and Lassies! As I’m sure you may have guessed, on day 5 we suggest a traditional Guinness Draught! After all, it is the ultimate St. Patrick’s Day beverage.

Not only is this the beer of Ireland and beverage of choice for many who call the land home, it is the perfect drink for a day full of eating and drinking. Contrary to popular belief, it is light and thin, allowing those of you who are still sticking to New Years Resolutions to be happy. Believe it or not, there are only 125 calories in each 12 oz pint-sized glass. Guinness uses a unique Nitrogen/Carbon Dioxide mix to push the beer through the lines and into your glass. Unlike most other beers, it consists of 75% nitrogen and 25% carbon dioxide. Nitrogen is the reason for the thick, creamy head that is easily recognizable on a Guinness. The bubbles it creates are much smaller than CO2 bubbles, meaning you don’t get as full–this crafty trick allows us to save room for lots of corned beef and cabbage.

To ensure you are drinking the best pint of Guinness possible every time you choose the Irish stout, watch this video to learn about the perfect pour! We promise it really does make all the difference!

For those of you choosing not to drink this St. Patrick’s Day, it is very easy to incorporate Guinness into your delicious holiday recipes! From tenderizing beef in a classic meat-and-potatoes Irish stew, to drizzling it on vanilla ice cream we promise it adds wonderful flavor to whatever sweet treat or hearty meal you are making! Find some great recipes here: https://www.guinnesshooley.com/food-recipes

However you choose to celebrate this history-rich tradition, always remember to enjoy responsibly!

Sláinte!

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NIKE RISK EVERYTHING – WINNER STAYS

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It’s that special time in the sports world that only arrives every 4 years, when Americans realize that the beautiful game is back and ready to fill their Summer sports malaise, where the only other news of note is the exciting stretch run of only 92 games to go in the baseball season.

To capitalize on the energy around the World Cup and the world’s most popular sport (deal with it, America), Nike launched the latest in a series of innovative soccer-based campaigns with RISK EVERYTHING: a challenge to all footballers to take chances and play with a creativity that takes the game to its highest and most entertaining level (deal with it, Spain).

To harness and amplify that creativity, NIKE developed a 4 v 4 tournament unlike any other: Winner Stays. With a unique set of rules and a winner stays on mentality that throws brackets to the curb, Nike and MKTG INC set out to the crown the best in NYC amidst concrete arenas in the heart of the city.

Nike Risk Everything              Pearl St. Plaza – Brooklyn Qualifier                                            Pier 26 – Manhattan Qualifier

Over 680 players and 120 teams battled it out at the Brooklyn and Manhattan Qualifiers for a chance to advance to the Finals. Set against iconic, unexpected locations in the two boroughs, the events drove home the city-based inspiration with locally relevant artists and food trucks. With 5 teams from each Qualifier moving on to the Finals, it was time to prepare for a championship setting unlike any other.

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With the flight deck of the USS Intrepid playing host to the Finals and conjuring up memories of one of the best NIKE Soccer campaigns of all time, the Risk Everything mantra reached a fever pitch (pun intended), as players battled it out in front of 1,100 fans. The NY Finals were held first, as the top 10 teams from the qualifiers fought to be crowned the NY Champion. After The Wild emerged victorious, it was time to take on the LA champion (who had been flown in for the evening) to be crowned the best in the USA. As a precursor to the Stanley Cup Finals, LA (got lucky and) took home the victory. Finally, a trophy celebration amidst a 3-minute firework show that would wow even the boldest of pyros brought the Winner Stays tournament to a close.

Nike’s campaign for creativity and boldness keeps rolling as the World Cup kicks into high gear, and with the Group Stage on pace to provide the highest scoring tournament of all time, it seems like the world has heard the message.*

*Unless you’re from Spain. 

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